0Ls: What's your plan B?

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
ksllaw
Posts: 312
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 6:17 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby ksllaw » Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:33 pm

Striderite3 wrote:
A) I don't believe you HAVE to have a BS in accounting before pursuing your MAcc. However, at my school and most of our peer schools, they require you to have your BS in accounting. It just removes a lot of the hassle associated with prereqs and whatnot. I would think you can do your MAcc as other schools and not have a BS in accounting but I may be mistaken. However, most people in my program are in the program purely because they need 150 hours to sit for the CPA. So if you can get the 150 hour requirement without getting a MAcc then that's a very possible option. Just depends.

B) I went the traditional route: BS degree in 4 years, internship with Big Four, MAcc program. So all in all 5 years. If you are starting from scratch (zero college coursework)then I think 5 years is abut the minimum. If you already have a degree in something else then you most likely have several general prereqs knocked out already. There were people in my undegrad who had already graduated with a "flexible" degree (i.e. finance, management, poly sci, etc.), and couldn't find work so they came back for their accounting degree. These students only needed the 8 required accounting classes because they already had all the general ed prereqs taken care of. Once you get into the MAcc program stage it's more dependent in your situation and what you're looking for. There are tons of programs whose bread and butter is students who work during the day and go to class at night.



Hey Striderite3,

Thought I'd message you clarify two quick things. But thanks so much, by the way, for your willingness to answer questions in that thread. :mrgreen: I think I can speak for others when I say we (at the very least, I) greatly appreciate it. (And, yes, I'm still doing my own research into accounting, so don't have questions at the moment...but maybe in the future!)

i.) re: "5-Year" time frame

Did you mean that someone with a BA (I doubled in Philosophy and Psychology w/ Math minor) already would still need 5 years to get a second bachelor's or MS in accounting? Or you were meaning it would take 5 years from scratch? I do have a double-major completed already.

I was looking at options for either a second BS (post-bac) in accounting or, if possible, to go straight into a Master's (and try to knock out any major pre-reqs this year). But, again, the main issue was whether your "5 years" time frame was for someone with zero college work or not (that's what I figured, but wasn't 100% sure).

ii.) re: 150 hours

I've seen this 150 hours things talked about on other forums, but never knew what folks were referring to. Is that 150 total hours of college coursework in any subject or does it have to be of a certain type that fits the accounting curriculum? Is that a universal/nation-wide rule for the CPA exam?

Thanks so much for the clarifications!

ksllaw
Posts: 312
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 6:17 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby ksllaw » Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:43 pm

BlaqBella wrote:
thelawdoctor wrote:
ksllaw wrote:
BlaqBella wrote:Nursing is my backup. I already have several courses under my belt for a Bachelor of Science Nursing degree. At least my BSN can take me overseas with ease.


viewtopic.php?f=10&t=202111
43% of Nursing Grads Can't Find Jobs

Have you seen this thread yet?


Those are mostly RN trying to find RN work.
LPN and the like are always needed.

-Depends on what type of "nurse" you are talking about.

Hell, go down a peg more as a CNA if you really want "security"...............if you want "pay" avoid medical all together unless it involves a doctorate though.


Article actually mostly talks about LPNs and RNs. Not BSN RNs. There is a difference. I intended to get my BSN which has better placement rates than RNs without a Bachelor's.



What is the hierarchy of nursing degrees and distinctions, BlaqBella?

User avatar
BlaqBella
Posts: 869
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:41 am

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby BlaqBella » Tue Feb 05, 2013 7:03 pm

ksllaw wrote:What is the hierarchy of nursing degrees and distinctions, BlaqBella?


From lowest to highest:

1. CNA - Certified Nurse Assistant
2. LPN/LVN - Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse. They are not RNs and sit a different board cetified exam.
3. RN (Associate Degree)
4. RN with Bachelor's in Nursing
5. RN with CCRN qualification
6. Master's in Nursing RN (can be specialized or generic)
7. Advanced Practitioner Registered Nurse (often requires some years of experience + advanced degrees)
8. Doctorate of Nursing Practice (clinical-based) or Doctorate of Nursing Science (research-based)


APRNs are often considered any of the following (list not exhaustive):

- Nurse Anesthetist (they put you to sleep and cost half of what an anesthesiologist will cost you);

- Midwives;

- Clinical Specialists (The consultants of nursing);

- Nursing Practitioners - They are APRNs but now require a Doctorate degree. NPs can open their own clinics and administer drugs. They can range in specialty from Acute Care, Critical Care, Pediatric, Psychiatric, Obstetric, etc.


Most highly paid nurses are generally, nurse anesthetists. Yearly salaries range from $100,000-north of 200k/year for working about 3 days a week. NPs are the second highest paid.

jwinaz
Posts: 179
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby jwinaz » Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:46 am

El_Gallo wrote:I decided not to go to law school last year even though I had T14 numbers. I am currently doing Teach for America. I feel like a lot of liberal arts majors feel pressure to go to law school, just because they don't feel like they have other options. So far, for me education have been an extremely rewarding field. I would encourage other people to look into it.

There are a lot of ways to get a masters in education for nearly free. There are parts of the country that are in desperate need of teachers. After 3-6 years you can reasonably expect to move into administration and and make between 50k-90k. If you become a principle of a big school or a superintendent you can make well over 100k.

Check out this link for a list of educator salaries in in Washington State. There are 100's of people that make a six figure income. http://wwwb.thenewstribune.com/databases/school_pay/

Not that I advocate going into education for money, but I feel like a lot of people don't even look into it because they believe they will be poor for their entire lives.


That's interesting. Adjusted for COL in Washington, $50K is not that much. It's one of the more expensive states (esp. Seattle area), but a nicer place to live than most probably.

Can you provide some info. for teacher training programs that you say are free? ...That sounded interesting to me.

thelawdoctor
Posts: 416
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 6:12 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby thelawdoctor » Wed Feb 06, 2013 12:32 pm

jwinaz wrote:
El_Gallo wrote:I decided not to go to law school last year even though I had T14 numbers. I am currently doing Teach for America. I feel like a lot of liberal arts majors feel pressure to go to law school, just because they don't feel like they have other options. So far, for me education have been an extremely rewarding field. I would encourage other people to look into it.

There are a lot of ways to get a masters in education for nearly free. There are parts of the country that are in desperate need of teachers. After 3-6 years you can reasonably expect to move into administration and and make between 50k-90k. If you become a principle of a big school or a superintendent you can make well over 100k.

Check out this link for a list of educator salaries in in Washington State. There are 100's of people that make a six figure income. http://wwwb.thenewstribune.com/databases/school_pay/

Not that I advocate going into education for money, but I feel like a lot of people don't even look into it because they believe they will be poor for their entire lives.


That's interesting. Adjusted for COL in Washington, $50K is not that much. It's one of the more expensive states (esp. Seattle area), but a nicer place to live than most probably.

Can you provide some info. for teacher training programs that you say are free? ...That sounded interesting to me.

$50K is a lot in the minds of those who apply for RN work.
The theory of being done at community college and making 5 times what they would have made is how they look at it.
Children of Doctors and Lawyers rarely desire to become an LPN and work up to an RN. It's mostly children of truck drivers and watiresses.
Perspective can make $50K and as Associates Degree look like a minor stepping stone, or a milehigh mountain.

User avatar
shifty_eyed
Posts: 1934
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:09 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby shifty_eyed » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:49 pm

My back up plans are looking less and less interesting to me career-wise.

1. Healthcare admin - I have 2 years experience in this field and could get a MHA.
2. Physician assistant
3. Masters in geology/environmental/petroleum engineering

User avatar
Crowing
Posts: 2636
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Crowing » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:47 pm

Eh, I have a STEM BS but there's no way in hell I want to do anything related to that so my backup plan would probably be to get a PhD in English and starve for the rest of my life.

User avatar
Legacy Rabbit
Posts: 244
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:52 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Legacy Rabbit » Thu Feb 14, 2013 5:11 pm

Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)

User avatar
jtabustos
Posts: 108
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:53 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby jtabustos » Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:16 am

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/takes-b-j ... 2U-;_ylv=3

Not sure how this relates to the OP's thread, but I saw this the other day. It takes a BA to serve as a file clerk nowadays at some jobs.

I've thought about LSAT tutoring for a part-time position.

toothbrush
Posts: 2388
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby toothbrush » Sat Feb 23, 2013 9:52 am

Legacy Rabbit wrote: I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

this is excellent.


I have a BA in Philosophy and Spanish.

I dwell on my plan B options more and more lately. I'm pretty unsure of what I'd like to do the most but I have a feeling post JD i'll end up doing one of these anyways :( Does anyone else feel that way? Like 10 years out I have a good feeling I'll be back in school.

- PhD / PsyD in Psych and do mental health counseling with teens / marriage and family therapy
(mental health has always been an interest of mine)

- Teach Spanish at lower level ( I guess get a Masters in Ed + cert classes)

- Work for UN Secretariat

P-salms
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:36 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby P-salms » Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:04 am

Plan B distracts plan A. I'll either make it and struggle or vice-versa.

User avatar
scifiguy
Posts: 575
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 2:41 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby scifiguy » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:14 am

Would anyone do this job?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPvCuc1_mgM (the video says it's the most dangerous job in the world and you need heart just to watch)

I feel I'd be paralyzed by fear.

User avatar
HankBashir
Posts: 536
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 3:01 am

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby HankBashir » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:21 am

The only plan B I have is to take my Mandarin and Spanish language skills and attempt to work for the State Department as a Foreign Serivice Offcer. Lord knows if I'd pass the test.

I currently only have one T14 acceptance, at GULC, and since I want BigLaw, I might not end up going if I can't get into some place with better BigLaw placement stats.

User avatar
star fox
Posts: 13748
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:13 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby star fox » Thu Feb 28, 2013 6:18 pm

Legacy Rabbit wrote:Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)


Good to see a fellow useless liberal arts degree holder finding some work. As a senior undergrad it's tough finding stuff. Got one interview for a research analyst position i hope goes well.. hoping to get a few more. I wish my school offered a paralegal certificate.. I'm not about to enroll in a program for a year at a local CC to get that. That is something I'd be interested in doing though.

User avatar
Gunnar Stahl
Posts: 1085
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 3:57 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Gunnar Stahl » Thu Feb 28, 2013 6:54 pm

john7234797 wrote:
Legacy Rabbit wrote:Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)


Good to see a fellow useless liberal arts degree holder finding some work. As a senior undergrad it's tough finding stuff. Got one interview for a research analyst position i hope goes well.. hoping to get a few more. I wish my school offered a paralegal certificate.. I'm not about to enroll in a program for a year at a local CC to get that. That is something I'd be interested in doing though.

My understanding is that you do not need a paralegal certificate to become a paralegal.

10romeom
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 7:29 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby 10romeom » Thu Feb 28, 2013 9:45 pm

My back up plan, (I guess it qualifies) is to attend a lower twirled school on hopefully a fat scholarship and try to leverage it for a government agency gig ie FBI, CIA, NAS. They all hire JD's.

User avatar
Crowing
Posts: 2636
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Crowing » Thu Feb 28, 2013 10:59 pm

Ghost93 wrote:
john7234797 wrote:
Legacy Rabbit wrote:Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)


Good to see a fellow useless liberal arts degree holder finding some work. As a senior undergrad it's tough finding stuff. Got one interview for a research analyst position i hope goes well.. hoping to get a few more. I wish my school offered a paralegal certificate.. I'm not about to enroll in a program for a year at a local CC to get that. That is something I'd be interested in doing though.

My understanding is that you do not need a paralegal certificate to become a paralegal.


Yeah it's not required but a lot of firms at least around here make it mandatory

thelawdoctor
Posts: 416
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 6:12 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby thelawdoctor » Fri Mar 01, 2013 6:12 pm

Crowing wrote:
Ghost93 wrote:
john7234797 wrote:
Legacy Rabbit wrote:Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)


Good to see a fellow useless liberal arts degree holder finding some work. As a senior undergrad it's tough finding stuff. Got one interview for a research analyst position i hope goes well.. hoping to get a few more. I wish my school offered a paralegal certificate.. I'm not about to enroll in a program for a year at a local CC to get that. That is something I'd be interested in doing though.

My understanding is that you do not need a paralegal certificate to become a paralegal.


Yeah it's not required but a lot of firms at least around here make it mandatory

It varies by state too

User avatar
Legacy Rabbit
Posts: 244
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:52 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Legacy Rabbit » Sat Mar 02, 2013 5:00 pm

john7234797 wrote:
Legacy Rabbit wrote:Double Major: Philosophy and Poli Sci and Minored in History.

I guess my undergrad degree has plateaued for my situation. I was very concerned about my ability to underwrite my lifestyle, and most importantly remain competitive, so I went back and received a paralegal certification that was newly being offered at my undergrad institution. My justification was that I need to have the income to help pay for law school and pay for the lifestyle. I wanted to remain "me" and pay out of pocket as much as I can. Plus, as oppose to going to school full time two semesters a year over three years and work in the summer, go part-time and hold a position that engages in substantive legal work at least 50 percent of the time.

This certification led to an internship with a highly respected tech company for a year. The certification, the tech company, the undergrad degree, and my prev years of work experience have culminated to a present situation of a job offer for about 50k as a paralegal. I will attend law school this fall in the state I grew up in part-time.

Companies are gearing towards wanting advanced degrees even for entry level positions. There are so many graduate degrees and experienced professional adults to pull from that someone in their 20s with only an undergrad liberal arts degree, without 3-5 years of substantive work experience as defined by the respected companies HR, may find it hard in today's current job environment.

I highly suggest to those of you who are not working Fortune 500, immediately do so.

Good positions to look for that assist you in building your resume: consulting, risk, contracts. These areas are also considered JD preference jobs and look great while you are a 0L. If you are not qualified for those positions. Working for a firm engaging in Foreclosure or bkptcy or short sales is very good. I say these three areas because someone with only a liberal arts degree can more than likely find a job in a firm or in house. Also, with a liberal arts degree jobs engaged or titled "research" are good too.

In conclusion, my situation:
No law school, than a full time worker bee :)


Good to see a fellow useless liberal arts degree holder finding some work. As a senior undergrad it's tough finding stuff. Got one interview for a research analyst position i hope goes well.. hoping to get a few more. I wish my school offered a paralegal certificate.. I'm not about to enroll in a program for a year at a local CC to get that. That is something I'd be interested in doing though.


I know this is late but good luck on the research analyst position. If that does not work out, try searching for jobs titled, "technical writer". Also search for "contracts specialist/administrator/manager".

If I were you also look at legislative work. Your major is solid for that. Have you thought about working on the hill. go to senate.gov and look at some positions. Or, go to your career center and search for congressional internships (most Hill jobs only want people with prior Hill experience), federal agency internships. You could go to campaign school (google for more info). You can also look at jobs that service debt (they hire a lot of liberal art undergrads). Since most internships look for new grads a year maybe two years after school. If I were you I would really hustle and search for a good internship, Congressional, Fed agency, Fortune 500. That does not work out. Hustle into a law firm.

My philosophy degree has actually been a bonus in interviews. Hiring managers, from my experience, seem very interested in the fact I have a philosophy degree. I personally think this helped getting my current position because my interviewer was inquisitive as to what I studied. My mentor at the tech company, a Director, was really impressed and we would have great conversations. She even recommended a few books to me. Philosophy is something that you have to love. People will immediately see the excitement when you tell them your major. It is a good ice breaker. But in regards to "useless", I will admit, if I had to change. I would have minored in something more business related. BUT HELL no to changing the Philo degree.

Who does not take pleasure in dissecting Hegel. :)

thelawdoctor
Posts: 416
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 6:12 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby thelawdoctor » Sun Mar 03, 2013 1:26 pm

libarts seemed stupid to see people take while in undergrad, but once you apply for grad you realize that GPA matters more than major (at least for JD and many MBA programs even) So, any prelaws reading this, factor that in.

You would be amazed how many people who argue their mouth dry that not to be true, but yes, very much so.
Last edited by thelawdoctor on Sun Mar 10, 2013 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

it'sjustme
Posts: 72
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:45 am

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby it'sjustme » Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:45 pm

I'm going to sell Pez - cherry flavored Pez. No question about it.

User avatar
Presidentjlh
Posts: 868
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:07 am

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby Presidentjlh » Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:38 pm

Plan B: Sink into a horrible depression.

User avatar
justonemoregame
Posts: 1160
Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2011 3:51 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby justonemoregame » Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:49 pm

My plan B, swallow pride and work two jobs in lieu of attending law school, is quickly becoming plan A.

User avatar
mqt
Posts: 2150
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:52 pm

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby mqt » Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:06 pm

Following my plan B, which is to work full time this year while I adjust to being a parent, re-taking the LSAT in June, and apply in the fall.

User avatar
francesfarmer
Posts: 1409
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:52 am

Re: 0Ls: What's your plan B?

Postby francesfarmer » Fri Mar 15, 2013 11:16 am

Adjusted plan b: stay at my job through my supervisor's maternity leave, take over her position while she's gone, profit. After that I think my company is going to get a contracting office which I'll be transferred to. I find contracts boring but there could be money in that down the line. And then I'll move across the country because I'm bored.




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests