International students and JD programs

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cowmater
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International students and JD programs

Postby cowmater » Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:04 pm

I've read a couple of threads where people have mentioned that being an international student is a soft minus. Is that true, or do people not know what the heck they're talking about? If it is true, why is that the case?

The samples available on LSN for the schools that I'm interested in don't have large enough of a sample for me to conclude one way or another.

Does it matter whether the international student finished their undergrad in the US (as is the case with me) or does the fact that you're the citizen of another country automatically qualify as a soft minus?

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geary86
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Re: International students and JD programs

Postby geary86 » Thu Nov 29, 2012 9:54 pm

tag

also interested in this

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Redamon1
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Re: International students and JD programs

Postby Redamon1 » Sat Dec 01, 2012 3:58 am

It can be a plus (diversity etc.) if you can overcome the AdCom's skepticism on:

(1) Your English language skills - you need to write a stellar personal statement and show (e.g. through study in the U.S.) that you master the language and would do great in a challenging academic environment.

(2) The reason for wanting a JD. This is an American law degree to practice in the US. Why does a foreigner want this degree? Does the applicant not understand this, or is it a carefully considered choice?

(3) Your academic credentials. Foreign applicants often come from schools with which AdComs are less familiar. They often don't have GPAs. So they are harder to evaluate, despite the LSAC report. If you come from a good (renowned) international school, that will help. Consider also including a letter from your school or addendum explaining your school's rank/worth in your country and your grading system.

(4) Because of all these uncertainties, a strong LSAT is even more important for international applicants.

Good luck!

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dingbat
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Re: International students and JD programs

Postby dingbat » Sat Dec 01, 2012 7:12 am

Let's backtrack here. Being foreign in and of itself is a good soft, but a soft. It's typically a tie breaker, unless you went to an internationally renowned university (Oxford, Sarbonne, etc. - if in doubt, it's not a renowned university). If you finished your UG in the US, you have a GPA. You probably won't outperform yout GPA/LSAT scores. If your UG is foreign, you don't have a GPA. Therefore your LSAT trumps all. Look at a school's 25%-50%-75% LSAT scores and figure that if you're above 75%, you'll probably be accepted but if you're below 25% you'll probably be rejected and at median it's a bit of a coin flip.



Redamon1 wrote:(1) Your English language skills - you need to write a stellar personal statement and show (e.g. through study in the U.S.) that you master the language and would do great in a challenging academic environment.
TOEFL
Redamon1 wrote:(2) The reason for wanting a JD. This is an American law degree to practice in the US. Why does a foreigner want this degree? Does the applicant not understand this, or is it a carefully considered choice?
Schools assume that if you're applying for a JD, you want a JD. For the most part, they're happy to take your money regardless of your life goals
Redamon1 wrote:(3) Your academic credentials. Foreign applicants often come from schools with which AdComs are less familiar. They often don't have GPAs. So they are harder to evaluate, despite the LSAC report. If you come from a good (renowned) international school, that will help.
No. Schools barely care about your academic credentials here. They really won't care that much
Redamon1 wrote: Consider also including a letter from your school or addendum explaining your school's rank/worth in your country and your grading system.
Do not bother with this. The LSAC report is sufficient. They don't care and even if you went to e.g. the top school in South America, that's not particularly impressive.
Redamon1 wrote:(4) Because of all these uncertainties,a strong LSAT is even more important for international applicants.
fixed




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