Litigation Concentration

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
cmartin5970
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 8:49 pm

Litigation Concentration

Postby cmartin5970 » Tue May 15, 2012 3:33 pm

This may be a stupid question but I have tried searching the forum and haven't had any luck. I am looking into law schools and many offer a litigation concentration. I am interested in criminal law, do litigation concentrations usually cover civil and criminal law or do they usually focus on civil litigation.

User avatar
BVest
Posts: 5700
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 1:51 pm

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby BVest » Tue May 15, 2012 3:56 pm

Most trial ad concentrations will be more focused on civil cases.

Here's a thread on crim law:
http://www.top-law-schools.com/archives ... =5&t=38727

User avatar
DocHawkeye
Posts: 640
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 11:22 am

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby DocHawkeye » Tue May 15, 2012 4:15 pm

My school offers a criminal litigation concentration but by that they mean you basically take the civil litigation concentration plus crim pro and and work in the criminal clinic.

User avatar
kalvano
Posts: 11724
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:24 am

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby kalvano » Tue May 15, 2012 4:21 pm

Don't focus on "concentration". You need to take Crim, Crim Pro, Evidence, and your state Crim Pro if offered, plus do crim clinic. If you plan on doing federal work, Admin will be useful too.

You can probably intern over the summer for a criminal court judge as well. I did it, and you'll learn a lot about being a criminal lawyer.

TheProsecutor
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 12:50 pm

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby TheProsecutor » Tue May 15, 2012 4:21 pm

law school is essentially a litigation concentration. The case method is litigation heavy because a lot of what litigators do is research case law and distinguish current facts from the case law facts. If you want to be a litigator be sure to take these courses: Advanced Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Administrative Law, and an advanced constitutional law course. For further training try to do an externship with a federal or state judge and/or work at a USAO. Moot court is also good litigation training because it will get you writing and doing oral arguments and of course serving as an editor on a journal is good litigation training because proper citing is a good skill to have as a junior litigator.

TheProsecutor
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 12:50 pm

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby TheProsecutor » Tue May 15, 2012 4:45 pm

Oh and for what it is worth, GULC has the best crim law clinic by far, I think.

blsingindisguise
Posts: 1296
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 1:08 am

Re: Litigation Concentration

Postby blsingindisguise » Tue May 15, 2012 6:12 pm

TheProsecutor wrote:law school is essentially a litigation concentration. The case method is litigation heavy because a lot of what litigators do is research case law and distinguish current facts from the case law facts. If you want to be a litigator be sure to take these courses: Advanced Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Administrative Law, and an advanced constitutional law course. For further training try to do an externship with a federal or state judge and/or work at a USAO. Moot court is also good litigation training because it will get you writing and doing oral arguments and of course serving as an editor on a journal is good litigation training because proper citing is a good skill to have as a junior litigator.


Right, offering a "litigation concentration" would be almost silly, in fact, since law school is already so heavily skewed toward litigation. There's also no reason to need a "concentration" at all because you can take most of the same courses at any reputable law school.

I would, however, say that it might be unnececssary to take all four of those courses, depending on what kind of a litigator OP wants to be.




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests