Learning to Talk About Sports...

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
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TIKITEMBO
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat May 05, 2012 3:00 pm

charliep wrote:i would be more impressed with a woman who can talk about spider jerusalem than a woman who can talk about sports



:wink: I've definitely got that covered.


lisjjen wrote:We like sports


:lol:

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:01 pm

lisjjen wrote:
ilovesf wrote:
berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.


I agree wholeheartedly. You shouldn't quit something you love because of a couple fratty cheesedicks. Quite possibly the biggest badass I know in law school has her sports down better than anyone I know.



Ironic you use this to make you point. You do know fraternity members exist that respect women/think they can do whatever the fuck they want, even if it involves something historically dominated by males?


Being sexist~=fratty
Last edited by nucky thompson on Sat May 05, 2012 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ilovesf
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby ilovesf » Sat May 05, 2012 3:04 pm

lisjjen wrote:We like sports

:lol: And Jorma is wearing a Frank Gore jersey <3

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:10 pm

blurbz wrote:I love sport. Some of my closest friends are NASCAR owners.



Not given due applause.

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lisjjen
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby lisjjen » Sat May 05, 2012 3:11 pm

nucky thompson wrote:
lisjjen wrote:
ilovesf wrote:
berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.


I agree wholeheartedly. You shouldn't quit something you love because of a couple fratty cheesedicks. Quite possibly the biggest badass I know in law school has her sports down better than anyone I know.



Ironic you use this to make you point. You do know fraternity members exist that respect women/think they can do whatever the fuck they want, even if it involves something historically dominated by males?


Being sexist~=fratty


Really bro? Are you really that tender about this?
Last edited by lisjjen on Sat May 05, 2012 3:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Dany
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dany » Sat May 05, 2012 3:14 pm

nucky thompson wrote:
lisjjen wrote:
ilovesf wrote:
berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.

I agree wholeheartedly. You shouldn't quit something you love because of a couple fratty cheesedicks. Quite possibly the biggest badass I know in law school has her sports down better than anyone I know.

Ironic you use this to make you point. You do know fraternity members exist that respect women/think they can do whatever the fuck they want, even if it involves something historically dominated by males?


Being sexist~=fratty

FBS

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:15 pm

Ironic you use this to make you point. You do know fraternity members exist that respect women/think they can do whatever the fuck they want, even if it involves something historically dominated by males?


Being sexist~=fratty[/quote]

Really bro? I have a spot reserved in my wedding party for my best friend, who was president of his frat. Are you really that tender about this?[/quote]


Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.

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lisjjen
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby lisjjen » Sat May 05, 2012 3:17 pm

nucky thompson wrote:Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.


Are you denying that sexism is a prevalent theme in the culture? I'm not ascribing it to everyone, but tell me I'm wrong.

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Dany
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dany » Sat May 05, 2012 3:21 pm

nucky thompson wrote:Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.

You should worry less about the sexist stereotype and more about the dumb stereotype.

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ilovesf
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby ilovesf » Sat May 05, 2012 3:23 pm

Dany wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.

You should worry less about the sexist stereotype and more about the dumb stereotype.

:lol:

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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:26 pm

lisjjen wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.


Are you denying that sexism is a prevalent theme in the culture? I'm not ascribing it to everyone, but tell me I'm wrong.



It obviouslly differs fraternity to fraternity, campus to campus - but I think the prevalace of sexism, relative to nonfraternity males of similar demographic, is negligible.... Which is why the initial distinction seemed a bit unfair. Again, not tender, i think you said it not really thinking but the general stereotype perpetuated thoughout society is probably why most fraternity members of sound character try to hide/avoid past membership - fearing unjustified judgement

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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:28 pm

Dany wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:Really not tender at all, just thought it was interesting. You wouldn't have used the description fratty out of no where unless you subconsciously or whatever viewed people in fraternitys as sexist.

You should worry less about the sexist stereotype and more about the dumb stereotype.




Hahahaha - my apologies. Do you honestly believe that was anything more than an iPad typing mistake? Ie: changed the sentence, the word was fraternity, there used to be an a... Never mind. You should worry about being the annoying person that points out insignificant mistakes

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soj
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby soj » Sat May 05, 2012 3:37 pm

nucky thompson wrote:You should worry about being the annoying person that points out insignificant mistakes

Are you really calling others out for being pedantic?
nucky thompson wrote:Ironic you use this to make you point. You do know fraternity members exist that respect women/think they can do whatever the fuck they want, even if it involves something historically dominated by males?


Being sexist~=fratty

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:41 pm

Are you trying to equate the two "mistakes"

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soj
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby soj » Sat May 05, 2012 3:47 pm

nucky thompson wrote:Are you trying to equate the two "mistakes"

I think yours is more annoying because you derailed an on-topic conversation to jerk off about fraternity stereotypes, as if lisjjen implied that all fraternity members are sexist. Hence the fragible butt syndrome.

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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 3:53 pm

soj wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:Are you trying to equate the two "mistakes"

I think yours is more annoying because you derailed an on-topic conversation to jerk off about fraternity stereotypes, as if lisjjen implied that all fraternity members are sexist. Hence the fragible butt syndrome.



If you don't see the irony in the poster criticizing men who view all women as incapable of talking sports while the same time calling them fratty cheesedicks then I can't help you. White kinghting does not help progression of the thread either

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soj
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby soj » Sat May 05, 2012 3:58 pm

nucky thompson wrote:
soj wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:Are you trying to equate the two "mistakes"

I think yours is more annoying because you derailed an on-topic conversation to jerk off about fraternity stereotypes, as if lisjjen implied that all fraternity members are sexist. Hence the fragible butt syndrome.



If you don't see the irony in the poster criticizing men who view all women as incapable of talking sports while the same time calling them fratty cheesedicks then I can't help you. White kinghting does not help progression of the thread either

No one cares about your off-topic crusade to clarify fraternity stereotypes that were used partly in jest. The fact that I'm not the first to point this out doesn't mean I'm white knighting.

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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 4:01 pm

Okay, thanks for setting me straight man... Really.

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nshapkar
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nshapkar » Sat May 05, 2012 4:23 pm

TIKITEMBO wrote:So, I've heard that being able to talk about sports (football/basketball/baseball) is pretty important for social networking in law school. I've never been that interested in national or college teams, and I'm wondering what might be the best way to start. I'm not completely adverse to sports (did quite a few myself in high school). I've been a bit turned off by national teams because of the (perhaps false?) assumption that most of the team wearing a jersey for a particular state/city is not actually from that area/doesn't really care about the area/is only there for the money. There are also things like diva players/huge salaries etc. Networking is very important to me though and I'd say I'm interested enough.

Also, is baseball really all that important to know about? I've gone to a few national games, but sitting through a game on t.v. is terrible. Football and basketball would probably be the best fit for me.



I'm kind of confused by this. Generally, if you play for a national team then you were born in that country and have lived there for quite a while. Also, national teams don't really pay their players that much. To the average person it's good money, but to many athletes from the major sports (basketball, soccer (excluding MLS), etc.) it's nothing.

If you're just now getting into sports and want to get into basketball and football find a team that piques your interest. DON'T (I mean you can, but what's the fun in that?) pick the best current team or the one that is grabbing all the headlines, unless you're from that city/state of course. Try to catch one game per week, with football that's not asking for much. With basketball aim for the big matchups (similar ranked teams, both fighting for a playoff spot, from the same division, game against the best team in the league, etc.) and that way you'll expose yourself to the bigger names of the league. Eventually, especially if you genuinely enjoy it, you'll naturally open up to watching more games and will be pleasantly surprised by how much you know. Lastly, for whichever teams you pick find the beat writer in your local paper and read their pre/post game articles. Lots of time the pre game articles mention interesting things to look forward to and the post game articles tend to point out things you may have missed.


And, yes, it is an assumption that most players are there for the money regardless of the sport. Sometimes it is true, other times not so much. When it comes down to it, most athletes play because they love the sport, but eventually drift from that when millions of dollars are thrown their way and their egos become artificially inflated by their agents. It has become pretty rampant in modern sports (money) and that's why I tend to respect those players who clearly don't have money as their most important consideration when it comes to where they play. Kevin Durant is a good example. IMO, top 5 player in the league yet he plays in Oklahoma City. When his contract was running out he signed an extension without all the drama that surrounds other players in similar situations (Lebron James two years ago, Dwigth Howard this year, Derron Williams, etc). Another is Steve Nash, he's loyal and has never asked to be traded despite how clear it is he's wasting his career here in Phoenix because we're not going anywhere.

Anyways, pardon my excessive, and probably quite pointless, post.


EDIT: Also right now is the best time to get into basketball--the playoffs just started. It's the most exciting basketball you'll see (aside from Spurs/Jazz series) and it'll introduce you to the basics of things worth knowing. So yeah, watch as much playoff basketball as you can. Towards the end of the playoffs when there's 4 teams left or so you'll know more about those teams than you'd ever expect.
Last edited by nshapkar on Sat May 05, 2012 4:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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blurbz
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby blurbz » Sat May 05, 2012 4:34 pm

nshapkar wrote:
TIKITEMBO wrote:So, I've heard that being able to talk about sports (football/basketball/baseball) is pretty important for social networking in law school. I've never been that interested in national or college teams, and I'm wondering what might be the best way to start. I'm not completely adverse to sports (did quite a few myself in high school). I've been a bit turned off by national teams because of the (perhaps false?) assumption that most of the team wearing a jersey for a particular state/city is not actually from that area/doesn't really care about the area/is only there for the money. There are also things like diva players/huge salaries etc. Networking is very important to me though and I'd say I'm interested enough.

Also, is baseball really all that important to know about? I've gone to a few national games, but sitting through a game on t.v. is terrible. Football and basketball would probably be the best fit for me.



I'm kind of confused by this. Generally, if you play for a national team then you were born in that country and have lived there for quite a while. Also, national teams don't really pay their players that much. To the average person it's good money, but to many athletes from the major sports (basketball, soccer (excluding MLS), etc.) it's nothing.

If you're just now getting into sports and want to get into basketball and football find a team that piques your interest. DON'T (I mean you can, but what's the fun in that?) pick the best current team or the one that is grabbing all the headlines, unless you're from that city/state of course. Try to catch one game per week, with football that's not asking for much. With basketball aim for the big matchups (similar ranked teams, both fighting for a playoff spot, from the same division, game against the best team in the league, etc.) and that way you'll expose yourself to the bigger names of the league. Eventually, especially if you genuinely enjoy it, you'll naturally open up to watching more games and will be pleasantly surprised by how much you know. Lastly, for whichever teams you pick find the beat writer in your local paper and read their pre/post game articles. Lots of time the pre game articles mention interesting things to look forward to and the post game articles tend to point out things you may have missed.


And, yes, it is an assumption that most players are there for the money regardless of the sport. Sometimes it is true, other times not so much. When it comes down to it, most athletes play because they love the sport, but eventually drift from that when millions of dollars are thrown their way and their egos become artificially inflated by their agents. It has become pretty rampant in modern sports (money) and that's why I tend to respect those players who clearly don't have money as their most important consideration when it comes to where they play. Kevin Durant is a good example. IMO, top 5 player in the league yet he plays in Oklahoma City. When his contract was running out he signed an extension without all the drama that surrounds other players in similar situations (Lebron James two years ago, Dwigth Howard this year, Derron Williams, etc). Another is Steve Nash, he's loyal and has never asked to be traded despite how clear it is he's wasting his career here in Phoenix because we're not going anywhere.

Anyways, pardon my excessive, and probably quite pointless, post.



Took me a minute, too, but I think she meant "national team" to mean really popular pro-team. I'm thinking like....Miami Heat/LA Lakers/Boston Celtics etc.

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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nshapkar » Sat May 05, 2012 4:38 pm

blurbz wrote:
nshapkar wrote:
TIKITEMBO wrote:So, I've heard that being able to talk about sports (football/basketball/baseball) is pretty important for social networking in law school. I've never been that interested in national or college teams, and I'm wondering what might be the best way to start. I'm not completely adverse to sports (did quite a few myself in high school). I've been a bit turned off by national teams because of the (perhaps false?) assumption that most of the team wearing a jersey for a particular state/city is not actually from that area/doesn't really care about the area/is only there for the money. There are also things like diva players/huge salaries etc. Networking is very important to me though and I'd say I'm interested enough.

Also, is baseball really all that important to know about? I've gone to a few national games, but sitting through a game on t.v. is terrible. Football and basketball would probably be the best fit for me.



I'm kind of confused by this. Generally, if you play for a national team then you were born in that country and have lived there for quite a while. Also, national teams don't really pay their players that much. To the average person it's good money, but to many athletes from the major sports (basketball, soccer (excluding MLS), etc.) it's nothing.

If you're just now getting into sports and want to get into basketball and football find a team that piques your interest. DON'T (I mean you can, but what's the fun in that?) pick the best current team or the one that is grabbing all the headlines, unless you're from that city/state of course. Try to catch one game per week, with football that's not asking for much. With basketball aim for the big matchups (similar ranked teams, both fighting for a playoff spot, from the same division, game against the best team in the league, etc.) and that way you'll expose yourself to the bigger names of the league. Eventually, especially if you genuinely enjoy it, you'll naturally open up to watching more games and will be pleasantly surprised by how much you know. Lastly, for whichever teams you pick find the beat writer in your local paper and read their pre/post game articles. Lots of time the pre game articles mention interesting things to look forward to and the post game articles tend to point out things you may have missed.


And, yes, it is an assumption that most players are there for the money regardless of the sport. Sometimes it is true, other times not so much. When it comes down to it, most athletes play because they love the sport, but eventually drift from that when millions of dollars are thrown their way and their egos become artificially inflated by their agents. It has become pretty rampant in modern sports (money) and that's why I tend to respect those players who clearly don't have money as their most important consideration when it comes to where they play. Kevin Durant is a good example. IMO, top 5 player in the league yet he plays in Oklahoma City. When his contract was running out he signed an extension without all the drama that surrounds other players in similar situations (Lebron James two years ago, Dwigth Howard this year, Derron Williams, etc). Another is Steve Nash, he's loyal and has never asked to be traded despite how clear it is he's wasting his career here in Phoenix because we're not going anywhere.

Anyways, pardon my excessive, and probably quite pointless, post.



Took me a minute, too, but I think she meant "national team" to mean really popular pro-team. I'm thinking like....Miami Heat/LA Lakers/Boston Celtics etc.

AHH I see. Yeah unless you're from those cities/states or your mom/dad are diehard fans, beginning to like those teams out of the blue kind of seems like you're jumping on the band wagon = sports cred shot to shit.

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ephemeral.bete.noire
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby ephemeral.bete.noire » Sat May 05, 2012 5:35 pm

TIKITEMBO wrote:So, I've heard that being able to talk about sports (football/basketball/baseball) is pretty important for social networking in law school. I've never been that interested in national or college teams, and I'm wondering what might be the best way to start. I'm not completely adverse to sports (did quite a few myself in high school). I've been a bit turned off by national teams because of the (perhaps false?) assumption that most of the team wearing a jersey for a particular state/city is not actually from that area/doesn't really care about the area/is only there for the money. There are also things like diva players/huge salaries etc. Networking is very important to me though and I'd say I'm interested enough.

Also, is baseball really all that important to know about? I've gone to a few national games, but sitting through a game on t.v. is terrible. Football and basketball would probably be the best fit for me.


Really??

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thelawyler
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby thelawyler » Sat May 05, 2012 6:15 pm

It's much like being able to talk about music, movies, tv, politics, etc.

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Dany
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dany » Sat May 05, 2012 6:16 pm

thelawyler wrote:It's much like being able to talk about music, movies, tv, politics, etc.

Out of those I actually think it's only like politics.

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ilovesf
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby ilovesf » Sat May 05, 2012 6:38 pm

thelawyler wrote:It's much like being able to talk about music, movies, tv, politics, etc.

Only I would not talk about politics in an interview, unless it was for some political organization.




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