Learning to Talk About Sports...

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sconnielaw13
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby sconnielaw13 » Sat May 05, 2012 1:23 pm

This all just seems super forced. I mean if you don't like sports who the hell cares then don't talk about it! Its not like anyone is going to judge you. I have a few friends in school that I will talk football or baseball with, but its not anything major at all. You will find that law students tend to talk endlessly about... law school. Theres a shocker. If your into computers and tech there will be people to conversate with about that... if your into music there will be those people etc. Law schools purposely try to make diverse classes... therefore there will be people that share your same interests. I wouldn't suggest trying to get into sports just so you feel you can connect with people. If they are super into sports and your not you probably don't have much in common with them anyways. Why force it? Be who you are. You will be fine.

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paratactical
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby paratactical » Sat May 05, 2012 1:29 pm

Seriously, dude, just stop. I've nailed law firm interviews where I just talked about D&D 3.5 for the whole time. Be interesting and like a variety of things that you actually like. Be knowledgable about what you like. Trying to force an interest that doesn't exist is silly, especially if you're going to do it over something as generic as professional sports. You'd be better off honing your background in something else that you're passionate about rather than forcing a faux interest for some kind of networking ideal.

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thelawyler
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby thelawyler » Sat May 05, 2012 1:34 pm

I disagree with a lot of what is said here.

Going from ignorant about professional sports to being able to navigate it in conversation has made a difference in clicking with my male peers. Have nothing else in common with somebody, but watch the same sport? You just found a connection. People going out after work to watch the game? You'd get invited if you talked about it before, but not if you haven't. Etc.

I think it's a good skill to have as a male in America. Doesn't mean you can't succeed, but it'll be a way to connect with people for the rest of your life, however superficially. So my point is less about landing a job at interviews and more about having more opportunities to click and get to know people.

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 1:35 pm

Well, this whole thread is weird to me. The way you refer to sports is just off.


Generally, conversations that come up about sports are related to current happenings. Playoffs, drafts, player behavior problems, coaches banging recruiting assistants etc. Not often do casual conversations come up about player history, coach history etc.


These are things knowledgable sports fans bring into conversations because it is somehow relevant to current events.

Basically, for now do not worry about "catching up" so to say, on history. For now, just leave espn on when you're not specifically watching something on the tele. Listen to espn radio. Go to espn.com and read some articles casually. You will start to pick up a lot, eventually learning the basic themes/news/relevant topics of the main us sports - nfl football, college bball/football, nba, and the MLB.

The more you immerse, the quicker you will learn the basics. Then, you'll start understanding more nuanced shit - much like learning any other topic.


Most sporting coverage on espn (television) is more basic/fluffier sports coverage than is radio. Keep that in mind. Also, I'd advise more basic understanding of the different leagues/how teams go about achieving goals (winning), you might find it interesting. Lots of conversations can be had just talking about a specific teams front office moves - ie: where is the team weak? (how do they improve? Free agency? Draft? Trade?)



I love sports, but recognize this affinity is subjective. I agree with other posters that you should do you, do not try and be someone else for the sake of a job - but a better general understanding of American sports will make you a more well rounded individual/certainly won't hurt (so long as you don't act like you know more than you do) professionally.

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IHeartPhilly
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby IHeartPhilly » Sat May 05, 2012 1:42 pm

OP, you should get some good mileage out of both of these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJKtVd8tv3A

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItXhez6PgPk

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BarcaCrossesTheAlps
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby BarcaCrossesTheAlps » Sat May 05, 2012 1:48 pm

TIKITEMBO wrote:Yeah, watching ESPN is fine. It's just sometimes so involved though that the discussion just washes over me. I suppose I can just make sure I have the internet handy.


Any advice on how to find sports more interesting? I'm sure this comes off as snobby and elitist, so apologies. 8)


I've found that understanding the rules will greatly improve your chances of finding a sport compelling entertainment. I'm a big hockey fan. "Tutoring" a few friends on basic rules like line passes, icing, etc., has given them enough to truly appreciate the game.

Figure out the basic lingua of a game or two, like football and baseball. Then watch a couple games with people that like those sports. Trust me, you will eventually find yourself a fan!

Good luck.

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MrPapagiorgio
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby MrPapagiorgio » Sat May 05, 2012 1:58 pm

thelawyler wrote:I disagree with a lot of what is said here.

Going from ignorant about professional sports to being able to navigate it in conversation has made a difference in clicking with my male peers. Have nothing else in common with somebody, but watch the same sport? You just found a connection. People going out after work to watch the game? You'd get invited if you talked about it before, but not if you haven't. Etc.

I think it's a good skill to have as a male in America. Doesn't mean you can't succeed, but it'll be a way to connect with people for the rest of your life, however superficially. So my point is less about landing a job at interviews and more about having more opportunities to click and get to know people.

Agreed, although I do think it very useful for job interviews as a male. OP, although the friends you've made up to this point may have nothing to do with sports, in the professional world (especially law and business), it's huge for connecting with people. Males in this line of work (and in general, I would say) like sports and they like to talk about sports. This has been discussed ad nauseam on this site. Shit, even just paying attention to the megathreads about various sports in the lounge would help you out.

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beachbum
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby beachbum » Sat May 05, 2012 2:06 pm

MrPapagiorgio wrote:
thelawyler wrote:I disagree with a lot of what is said here.

Going from ignorant about professional sports to being able to navigate it in conversation has made a difference in clicking with my male peers. Have nothing else in common with somebody, but watch the same sport? You just found a connection. People going out after work to watch the game? You'd get invited if you talked about it before, but not if you haven't. Etc.

I think it's a good skill to have as a male in America. Doesn't mean you can't succeed, but it'll be a way to connect with people for the rest of your life, however superficially. So my point is less about landing a job at interviews and more about having more opportunities to click and get to know people.

Agreed, although I do think it very useful for job interviews as a male. OP, although the friends you've made up to this point may have nothing to do with sports, in the professional world (especially law and business), it's huge for connecting with people. Males in this line of work (and in general, I would say) like sports and they like to talk about sports. This has been discussed ad nauseam on this site. Shit, even just paying attention to the megathreads about various sports in the lounge would help you out.

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TrojanHopeful
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TrojanHopeful » Sat May 05, 2012 2:07 pm

thelawyler wrote:I disagree with a lot of what is said here.

Going from ignorant about professional sports to being able to navigate it in conversation has made a difference in clicking with my male peers. Have nothing else in common with somebody, but watch the same sport? You just found a connection. People going out after work to watch the game? You'd get invited if you talked about it before, but not if you haven't. Etc.

I think it's a good skill to have as a male in America. Doesn't mean you can't succeed, but it'll be a way to connect with people for the rest of your life, however superficially. So my point is less about landing a job at interviews and more about having more opportunities to click and get to know people.


Indeed, as long as you are being true to yourself. If you don't like sports, come out and say "I hate sports, hate Kobe and the Lakers, don't give a shit about the Packers, and could care less that the Angels are absolutely awful this year."

Sports knowledge is just another asset that can prove to be helpful when socializing, just as is knowledge in other current events such as economics, financial markets, etc.

OP, if you actually like sports and are interested in learning more about individual players, stats, etc., then I suggest you join a fantasy league. If you put effort in researching your players and become involved in the league, you will no doubt know more about the respective sport than most other fans that don't play fantasy sports. Fantasy leagues for football are starting soon, so you can look into those (that is one of the sports you mentioned that might interest you). There are plenty of free leagues on espn.com, nfl.com, cbssports.com, etc. Although, the leagues that are played for money are much more fun (and I will add that most people ALWAYS have beginners luck).

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Dany
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dany » Sat May 05, 2012 2:09 pm

TrojanHopeful wrote:Indeed, as long as you are being true to yourself. If you don't like sports, come out and say "I hate sports, hate Kobe and the Lakers, don't give a shit about the Packers, and could care less that the Angels are absolutely awful this year."

This is dumb.

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TIKITEMBO
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat May 05, 2012 2:10 pm

Paratactical, I deeply hope that is true. I'm not a big D&D person, but I've sat in on a game or two. Narration games are okay, but that type of setting isn't always my fav. Al-Hiri Roach is fun, but so long.


thelawyler wrote:I disagree with a lot of what is said here.

Going from ignorant about professional sports to being able to navigate it in conversation has made a difference in clicking with my male peers. Have nothing else in common with somebody, but watch the same sport? You just found a connection. People going out after work to watch the game? You'd get invited if you talked about it before, but not if you haven't. Etc.

I think it's a good skill to have as a male in America. Doesn't mean you can't succeed, but it'll be a way to connect with people for the rest of your life, however superficially. So my point is less about landing a job at interviews and more about having more opportunities to click and get to know people.


Just to clarify for everyone, I'm a woman. :wink: I'd agree though that it's also just a good skill to have when dealing with male America (though many females obviously follow male dominated national sports as well).

This is basically my sentiment too. It's a connection. Just one I haven't really looked into because of my own personal hang-ups in regard to national sports which I admit are probably ignorant. I'm sure I could get over myself. And I know enough about general rules for the sports, I just need to know more about the players/coaches/teams.

BarcaCrossesTheAlps wrote:
TIKITEMBO wrote:
I've found that understanding the rules will greatly improve your chances of finding a sport compelling entertainment. I'm a big hockey fan. "Tutoring" a few friends on basic rules like line passes, icing, etc., has given them enough to truly appreciate the game.

Figure out the basic lingua of a game or two, like football and baseball. Then watch a couple games with people that like those sports. Trust me, you will eventually find yourself a fan!

Good luck.


Thanks :D

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Dany
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dany » Sat May 05, 2012 2:14 pm

I actually think trying to pretend you're interested in/knowledgeable about sports as a woman is way worse than just talking about something else altogether.

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Ludo!
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Ludo! » Sat May 05, 2012 2:17 pm

Yeah this may be sexist but that kind of changes everything. I don't think you're gonna be held to the same standard of sports knowledge as a man.

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Sat May 05, 2012 2:18 pm

Op, did not know you were female. Let's think about this...

For a male, it is easy to see why knowledge of sports will help with social interactions in legal professio - lots of males like sports so you will be able to discuss etc. but also, having a basic knowledge base prevents negative opinions of you...ie: "that new guy is weird, he didn't even know what march madness is"

The latter dimension does not exist for a woman. If a woman knows sports , it is usually a positive - if a woman does not know sports it will be EXPECTED. So, you naturally have no interest in sports (as evidence by your current understanding) - keep it that way. As a woman, learning sports will not really help you because male peers will likely avoid sport conversations with you subconsciously - and if it happens to come up and you don't know shit - no one will think differently of you. This is different for male/male interactions.

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MrPapagiorgio
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby MrPapagiorgio » Sat May 05, 2012 2:19 pm

Huge +1 to the post above. Didn't realize you were a woman.

berkeleykel06
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby berkeleykel06 » Sat May 05, 2012 2:27 pm

Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

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TrojanHopeful
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TrojanHopeful » Sat May 05, 2012 2:38 pm

berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.


I don't agree. I still find it an asset for a female to be able to talk about sports (as long as she knows what the hell she is talking about). There are plenty of females that are very knowledgeable in sports - the current trend in broadcasting clearly displays the surge in females being involved in discussing sports (Rachel Nichols on ESPN, for example). My girlfriend is very involved in fantasy football and therefore knows almost every player on every team - this has resulted in her being able to be involved in sports conversations in both social and professional environments.

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TIKITEMBO
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat May 05, 2012 2:39 pm

Ludovico Technique wrote:Yeah this may be sexist but that kind of changes everything. I don't think you're gonna be held to the same standard of sports knowledge as a man.



Haha, no I agree it's true.

nucky thompson wrote:The latter dimension does not exist for a woman. If a woman knows sports , it is usually a positive - if a woman does not know sports it will be EXPECTED. So, you naturally have no interest in sports (as evidence by your current understanding) - keep it that way. As a woman, learning sports will not really help you because male peers will likely avoid sport conversations with you subconsciously - and if it happens to come up and you don't know shit - no one will think differently of you. This is different for male/male interactions.



Definitely, females are held to a different standard when it comes to sports related knowledge. I find though that if you demonstrate yourself knowledgeable in male-dominated culture, and you bring the breasts, you are cool and the gang. Of course, you don't want to look like a pandering idiot either. Playing into sexist roles aside, I'm confident I'm pretty enough to pull off connecting with people on a lower level of knowledge (regarding sports) to have them not be annoyed. :lol: Vanity aside, I wouldn't push it though.

Fair point berkeley, I can hold my own in regard to a number of male dominated things, and I generally have to go through a vetting process in the conversation so that it's known that I'm not faking my knowledge/interest. I'd still preface any conversation about sports with that I didn't follow things too much. Set the bar low and then move up from there if I can.
Last edited by TIKITEMBO on Sat May 05, 2012 2:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ilovesf
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby ilovesf » Sat May 05, 2012 2:39 pm

berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.

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lisjjen
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby lisjjen » Sat May 05, 2012 2:40 pm

It won't matter for interviews, but it will to some extent for cocktail parties. I am a huge politics nerd and don't know dick about sports. I just smile and talk about the one college football team I know about when people talks sports. This becomes awkward when they are talking about the NBA.

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lisjjen
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby lisjjen » Sat May 05, 2012 2:44 pm

ilovesf wrote:
berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.


I agree wholeheartedly. You shouldn't quit something you love because of a couple fratty cheesedicks. Quite possibly the biggest badass I know in law school has her sports down better than anyone I know.

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blurbz
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby blurbz » Sat May 05, 2012 2:52 pm

I love sport. Some of my closest friends are NASCAR owners.

charliep
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby charliep » Sat May 05, 2012 2:55 pm

i would be more impressed with a woman who can talk about spider jerusalem than a woman who can talk about sports

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lisjjen
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby lisjjen » Sat May 05, 2012 2:56 pm


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TIKITEMBO
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat May 05, 2012 2:56 pm

lisjjen wrote:
ilovesf wrote:
berkeleykel06 wrote:Even women who knows a lot about sports shouldn't bring up sports to be on the safe side. There are too many dismissive sexist assholes out there who chuckle when a girl tries to talk about sports, even if she knows more than them.

ETA: the above refers to an interview context, not socializing in law school, where women talking about sports is more than fine.

:| I like sports and I talk about it. Those dudes can get over themselves. Not to mention, I have talked about sports in interviews and it was viewed positively.


I agree wholeheartedly. You shouldn't quit something you love because of a couple fratty cheesedicks. Quite possibly the biggest badass I know in law school has her sports down better than anyone I know.



I mean, I know this is how I've seen some guys act and it's unfortunate when you feel like you have to humor their insanely juvenile mentality. I don't think you should dumb it down, but I do think there are jerks that throw up the boys club/no girls allowed sign. I've experienced this from men talking about politics for example (all partisanship aside :wink: ).

It's of course up to you if you want to let them think they've got something over you in an interview (if they're displaying ass-hat personality traits). In life outside the interview, you crush them and you take their head as a trophy back to the Amazons. I have a female lawyer friend who is obsessed with sports and the male lawyer friends she obsessing over the sports with seem to think she's great.




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