Learning to Talk About Sports...

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
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Dr. Filth
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Dr. Filth » Mon May 07, 2012 11:43 pm

What's worse a NASCAR fan or a MMA fan?

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Mon May 07, 2012 11:43 pm

Tom Joad wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:
Those fighters probably drop panties faster than any other male since they assume so much risk of contact!


Clarify this. As far as the requirement goes, well if you pit two professional fighters against each other for 12 rounds, they are required to make physical contact--they are required to hit the head or the body. If you watch some matches, they will tell the fighters who are clinched to keep fighting else they get penalized. I don't know much about football, but if two football teams colluded not to hit each other during the entire game, I think it'd be acceptable. (I could be very wrong about this, as maybe the guidelines say that these people have to hit one another.)

Do you seriously think the legitimacy of a sport is based on how much CONTACT the participants have?


No I never talked about legitimacy. If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal. And imo, I think there is something to be said about people who have the balls to take stand in an enclosed ring and be ready to get pummeled without a cry. So when people start babbling stats about baseball/football/basketball, I find it useless. Of course this is just sports. On a different topic of respect and fighting, I also respect military folk--it takes a certain person to be that type of a fighter.

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bigeast03
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby bigeast03 » Mon May 07, 2012 11:47 pm

Applying_Late wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:
Those fighters probably drop panties faster than any other male since they assume so much risk of contact!


Clarify this. As far as the requirement goes, well if you pit two professional fighters against each other for 12 rounds, they are required to make physical contact--they are required to hit the head or the body. If you watch some matches, they will tell the fighters who are clinched to keep fighting else they get penalized. I don't know much about football, but if two football teams colluded not to hit each other during the entire game, I think it'd be acceptable. (I could be very wrong about this, as maybe the guidelines say that these people have to hit one another.)

Do you seriously think the legitimacy of a sport is based on how much CONTACT the participants have?


No I never talked about legitimacy. If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal. And imo, I think there is something to be said about people who have the balls to take stand in an enclosed ring and be ready to get pummeled without a cry. So when people start babbling stats about baseball/football/basketball, I find it useless. Of course this is just sports. On a different topic of respect and fighting, I also respect military folk--it takes a certain person to be that type of a fighter.


I feel like you're grossly mischaracterizing "other" sports. Athletes in any sport that are successful have a drive that can translate off the field/out of the ring. This is not limited to fight sports, nor is it limited to fighters.

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Tom Joad
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Tom Joad » Mon May 07, 2012 11:48 pm

Applying_Late wrote:If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal.

Well I have more respect for pro golfers because I THINK they are more driven and know how to fight.

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beachbum
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby beachbum » Mon May 07, 2012 11:50 pm

Dr. Filth wrote:What's worse a NASCAR fan or a MMA fan?


MMA for sure. MMA fans are obnoxious; the tough-guy persona and the obsession with fighting/violence/gaudy clothing makes for a pretty unbearable dude. And while NASCAR is boring as hell, at least with NASCAR fans you can drink enough whiskey/moonshine to forget you're watching cars driving in circles.

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Tom Joad
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Tom Joad » Mon May 07, 2012 11:54 pm

Dr. Filth wrote:What's worse a NASCAR fan or a MMA fan?

NASCAR itself is boring, but the fans are just your normal, down-home rednecks.

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Mon May 07, 2012 11:56 pm

nucky thompson wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:
nucky thompson wrote:I have to thank you, honestly you have no idea how many laughs I have enjoyed reading your posts in this thread. While I'm reading, I picture this huge, ambitious, great looking man that is tougher than anyone else in this thread reading his posts out loud - I got a little nervous though, picturing you in person, cause my chin is so soft and you probably could punch so hard!!!


You're welcome, glad I can make somebody laugh. Actually many top fighters aren't that big or pretty. I would say a lot many more are ambitious. The soft chin is something fighters say, so if you think the lingo is funny, which in a way it is, then take it up with or thank the commentators who came up with it. Regardless, there is some truth to it--some people just have a looser connection between the jaw and the brain. Just for the record, I don't think I'm tougher. I just like the business-type mentality: people from business school don't have guaranteed jobs, whereas people from a T3 law school complain when they can't land a 2L SA (referring to the whole Dewey shit show). When I told this Dewey story to a very successful businessman, he laughed at law students, calling them pussies and risk-averse. I have to agree with that, and I have a gut feeling that this somehow resonates with the whole stat-memorizing game. The OPs concern about learning how to talk about sports is really silly. You don't need to learn if you are confident in yourself like a successful business man would be.



Clarification about your "IMO fighters assume more risk of contact than padded football players or basketball, where fouls are called for contact" - dude... Did this even need to be said? Fighters take more contact? Really?

OK, I guess thanks for the statement.

Without the sarcasm, i actually picture you as being like the Yale undergraduate student Aleksey Vayner.

OK. Is there anyone you picture yourself to be?

You realize many successful businessmen are, you know, insecure?

As are many other professionals, but I don't see how that addresses anything. Many world champions are also insecure, so what?

Would you rather the deeply indebted law students that do not land a job rejoice? Opposed to complaining?

I'd rather them stfu, realize the risk they took (like say business students who can't find a job), and work hard to get a job. An HYSer saying "Wah, I can't get the job I want! Wah, I can't get a job even though I took massive amounts of debt!" is pathetic. If they worked hard, networked hard, fought hard, they'll get something. I don't care if it's a job at starbucks--shut up and treat it as a stepping stone and go further. You might not like it, and you might think it sounds nuts, but I've come to learn that thinking yourself privileged to things is the wrong attitude, if not the attitude of a loser.

Please, also, please please explain your sports psychology - how are you making such sweeping generalizations about fans of various sports, being stat memorizers or tough guys (I actually can't understand the dichotomy you're presenting)

There is not much to it. Like I said, it's an extreme viewpoint: if you aren't a fighter, then you are something else ie a stat monkey.

- also, why are the op's concerns silly? - if they were confident like a business man (op is a woman, by the way) they would have an understanding/affinity for sports?

Because they should be confident in talking about whatever the heck they find interesting. I'd rather have someone talk about underwater basket weaving if it's a passionate hobby. It usually makes for a personality, as opposed to stats, which I can look up on google. As for the correction on the OP being a woman, I don't think we have to be nit picky, and I think my arguments apply to both genders. It doesn't bring anything to the table to state it. For example, you said risk-adverse not risk-averse, but who cares, I know what you meant.

Please don't tell you successful friends about my pussy-esque comments either

OK.


Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Mon May 07, 2012 11:57 pm

Tom Joad wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal.

Well I have more respect for pro golfers because I THINK they are more driven and know how to fight.


Fair enough, I'd say Tiger Woods, for example, is probably a fighter. I just happen to think that in general fighters who step into the ring are a unique set of people.

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Tue May 08, 2012 12:01 am

bigeast03 wrote:I feel like you're grossly mischaracterizing "other" sports. Athletes in any sport that are successful have a drive that can translate off the field/out of the ring. This is not limited to fight sports, nor is it limited to fighters.


I don't disagree with you that athletes have drive that can translate off the field nor is a fighting character limited to fighting sports. I would just say on average I think professionals of fighting sports have a unique set of characteristics that differentiate them when it comes to competition where they envision that competition as a fight. There might be an argument made for the different drives of athletes who participated in team versus single sports.

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rinkrat19
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue May 08, 2012 12:02 am

Applying_Late wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal.

Well I have more respect for pro golfers because I THINK they are more driven and know how to fight.


Fair enough, I'd say Tiger Woods, for example, is probably a fighter. I just happen to think that in general fighters who step into the ring are a unique set of people.
I like fighters who can skate. Being able to throw and take a punch is whatever; being able to do it balancing on ice, when it's just an incidental side talent to being one of the best in the world at something entirely different, is impressive.

nucky thompson
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby nucky thompson » Tue May 08, 2012 12:03 am

Haha awesome - guy if you don't know who Aleksey Vayner is, you should google him. He is a fighter for sure. I hope you're not trollin me, by the way. I think your attitude toward violence/challenges will position you nicely in the professional world

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Tue May 08, 2012 12:05 am

rinkrat19 wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:
Applying_Late wrote:If anything, I just have more respect for fighters as they most likely are the best to work with, are the most driven, and they know what it means to fight outside the ring ie closing a deal.

Well I have more respect for pro golfers because I THINK they are more driven and know how to fight.


Fair enough, I'd say Tiger Woods, for example, is probably a fighter. I just happen to think that in general fighters who step into the ring are a unique set of people.
I like fighters who can skate. Being able to throw and take a punch is whatever; being able to do it balancing on ice, when it's just an incidental side talent to being one of the best in the world at something entirely different, is impressive.


Ali would probably agree with you. He was known for "dancing" in the ring. If you told him about fighters who balanced themselves on ice, he'd probably beam a grin at you.

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laxbrah420
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby laxbrah420 » Tue May 08, 2012 12:06 am

how tall are you and how much do you weigh?

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Tue May 08, 2012 12:08 am

nucky thompson wrote:Haha awesome - guy if you don't know who Aleksey Vayner is, you should google him. He is a fighter for sure. I hope you're not trollin me, by the way. I think your attitude toward violence/challenges will position you nicely in the professional world


I know who he is. Interesting guy to say the least.

My attitude is not towards violence, but it's definitely towards challenges and being the best at them, and I think a hard-working and healthy-competitive attitude is key to becoming successful in the professional world, whether that's business, law, or medicine.

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Tue May 08, 2012 12:09 am

laxbrah420 wrote:how tall are you and how much do you weigh?


I don't think that has anything to do with this thread or forum.

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Tom Joad
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Tom Joad » Tue May 08, 2012 12:13 am

laxbrah420 wrote:how tall are you and how much do you weigh?

I was going to ask this too. Seems like Little Man Disease to me.

Applying_Late
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Applying_Late » Tue May 08, 2012 12:19 am

Tom Joad wrote:
laxbrah420 wrote:how tall are you and how much do you weigh?

I was going to ask this too. Seems like Little Man Disease to me.


It's definitely not a napoleon complex. My original intent was for the OP to be confident and forget learning how to talk about baseball/football/basketball because it's useless. It's not only a waste of time but also a waste of brain power. She should focus her energy on other things and be herself. If some interviewer/associate/partner won't like her because she can't talk about stats, then she shouldn't be working there. She should work hard to be with a more interesting cohort. I then dug further and expressed my thoughts on what I think about stat monkeys, and how I view certain sports, etc, etc.

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laxbrah420
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby laxbrah420 » Tue May 08, 2012 12:22 am

Tom Joad wrote:
laxbrah420 wrote:how tall are you and how much do you weigh?

I was going to ask this too. Seems like aspergers syndrome to me.

Im totally aware it's not important, brah. I just want to know, ya dig?

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TaipeiMort
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue May 08, 2012 1:09 am

Applying_Late wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:
laxbrah420 wrote:how tall are you and how much do you weigh?

I was going to ask this too. Seems like Little Man Disease to me.


It's definitely not a napoleon complex. My original intent was for the OP to be confident and forget learning how to talk about baseball/football/basketball because it's useless. It's not only a waste of time but also a waste of brain power. She should focus her energy on other things and be herself. If some interviewer/associate/partner won't like her because she can't talk about stats, then she shouldn't be working there. She should work hard to be with a more interesting cohort. I then dug further and expressed my thoughts on what I think about stat monkeys, and how I view certain sports, etc, etc.


If you are male and aren't into sports (either to play or watch) other males will look down on you. I don't care what you say. Most males develop an interest in sports because they play them when younger. Competing and utilizing testosterone/ training/ winning and losing make you feel more alive.

I am not just talking about football and wrestling and basketball. I am talking any sport that required physical and mental endurance to compete in. This includes boxing, street-brawling, hockey, waterpolo, soccer, and even non contact sports like surfing, cross-country, lifting, and tennis. The two toughest guys I've known were a long distance runner and a special teams player-- they were insane in focus.

It isn't about being undersized either. I have buds that were physically small that worked harder than anyone and became awesome at something. It isn't even about being awesome. It is about working until you vomit and feeling great at the end of the day because you actually pushed yourself.

Every man knows that those that lack this desire probably had something screwed up happen to them growing up, like a bad/controlling parent or other role model who attempted to stomp the manhood out of them.

Do yourself a favor and go have a boxing match tourney with some bros-- break your nose or get some bruises. Then you wont seethe insecurity. Insecurity is like a weight, when you take it off you feel so much more confident and equipped. You don't want to go through life without experiencing manhood.

BTW: OP doesn't need to worry if she is a woman-- most wont care about her sports knowledge and will judge her based upon her intelligence, personality, niceness, self-confidence.

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bigeast03
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby bigeast03 » Tue May 08, 2012 1:16 am

Maybe I'm naive, or don't have enough real-world experience yet, but I feel like nowhere that I've been have gender roles been more defined and prominent than on TLS.

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PARTY
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby PARTY » Tue May 08, 2012 1:18 am

TaipeiMort wrote:Every man knows that those that lack this desire probably had something screwed up happen to them growing up, like a bad/controlling parent or other role model who attempted to stomp the manhood out of them.


you sound stupid.

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TaipeiMort
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue May 08, 2012 1:39 am

PARTY wrote:
TaipeiMort wrote:Every man knows that those that lack this desire probably had something screwed up happen to them growing up, like a bad/controlling parent or other role model who attempted to stomp the manhood out of them.


you sound stupid.


I sincerely apologize if I offended you man.

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bmore_md
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby bmore_md » Tue May 08, 2012 1:53 am

bigeast03 wrote:Maybe I'm naive, or don't have enough real-world experience yet, but I feel like nowhere that I've been have gender roles been more defined and prominent than on TLS.


LOL

You haven't been many places have you?

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TaipeiMort
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue May 08, 2012 2:15 am

bigeast03 wrote:Maybe I'm naive, or don't have enough real-world experience yet, but I feel like nowhere that I've been have gender roles been more defined and prominent than on TLS.


I can't really speak to the distinct "gender roles" played by women-- as women I know seem so different and I don't see how I could paint them with a broad brush.

However, speaking to the characteristics of men outlined above, I have yet to meet a man-- gay or straight, black or white or asian, fat or skinny, tall or short, smart or stupid, Jewish or Catholic or Atheist or Muslim, that I have known to feel differently about how good it feels to occasionally exercise/express your maleness.

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Kess
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Re: Learning to Talk About Sports...

Postby Kess » Wed May 09, 2012 2:02 am

I'm a female and a huge hockey fan. Sometimes it has been a great conversational asset, but FWIW there have been times when that has backfired on me. Male colleagues can have a hard time believing that a feminine woman is true fan and the conversation turned more into me "proving" that I am really such a fan.




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