Undergrad Major

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XxMVPxX
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby XxMVPxX » Tue Feb 21, 2012 7:24 pm

Kikero wrote:
Most applications actually ask if you have a relative that attended, although I believe it is only for relatives who attended the law school and not just the university in general. I would guess if an application asks "Have any of your relatives graduated from X Law School?" and you check no, then writing about how one of your relatives attended X University probably won't help.

Edit: Rinkrat y u poast faster than m3?


If it only asks about relatives that have attended specifically the law school I might just try to subtly work it into an essay, not base the essay solely on that fact. For instance "I first became interested in attending when I visited my cousin (who attended as an undergrad) and noticed how great the location of the campus is." Or something along those lines.

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Kikero
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Kikero » Tue Feb 21, 2012 7:27 pm

XxMVPxX wrote:
Kikero wrote:
Most applications actually ask if you have a relative that attended, although I believe it is only for relatives who attended the law school and not just the university in general. I would guess if an application asks "Have any of your relatives graduated from X Law School?" and you check no, then writing about how one of your relatives attended X University probably won't help.

Edit: Rinkrat y u poast faster than m3?


If it only asks about relatives that have attended specifically the law school I might just try to subtly work it into an essay, not base the essay solely on that fact. For instance "I first became interested in attending when I visited my cousin (who attended as an undergrad) and noticed how great the location of the campus is." Or something along those lines.


That probably couldn't hurt you at all, if nothing else it personalizes your application somewhat.

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chem
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby chem » Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:59 pm

Kikero wrote:
XxMVPxX wrote:
Kikero wrote:
Most applications actually ask if you have a relative that attended, although I believe it is only for relatives who attended the law school and not just the university in general. I would guess if an application asks "Have any of your relatives graduated from X Law School?" and you check no, then writing about how one of your relatives attended X University probably won't help.

Edit: Rinkrat y u poast faster than m3?


If it only asks about relatives that have attended specifically the law school I might just try to subtly work it into an essay, not base the essay solely on that fact. For instance "I first became interested in attending when I visited my cousin (who attended as an undergrad) and noticed how great the location of the campus is." Or something along those lines.


That probably couldn't hurt you at all, if nothing else it personalizes your application somewhat.


It's not going to help. At all

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yngblkgifted
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby yngblkgifted » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:04 pm

XxMVPxX wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
When choosing a major, you should consider:
1. What you can get close to a 4.0 in.
2. What could get you a post-college job if you end up not going to law school for whatever reason.
(unfortunately, these are frequently mutually exclusive!)


The reason I chose business is because I was under the assumption that law schools would look favorably on someone who challenged them self with a tougher major as opposed to just being a psychology major. If someone has a 3.5 in business (which requires calculus, stat 1 & 2, accounting 1 & 2, etc.) is that akin to someone having like a 3.7 in psychology?


If both the psych and the business majors want to go to law school, the psych major will end up winning. Law schools don't give a damn that you majored in business (which is a relatively easy major in and of itself) over psychology. USNRW doesn't report majors. I was a pysch major, FWIW, and I knew I couldn't get a real job with that, but I did know I could get close to 4.0 with not much effort and use my free time to study for the LSAT. The end.

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Kikero
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Kikero » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:06 pm

chem wrote:
Kikero wrote:
XxMVPxX wrote:
Kikero wrote:
Most applications actually ask if you have a relative that attended, although I believe it is only for relatives who attended the law school and not just the university in general. I would guess if an application asks "Have any of your relatives graduated from X Law School?" and you check no, then writing about how one of your relatives attended X University probably won't help.

Edit: Rinkrat y u poast faster than m3?


If it only asks about relatives that have attended specifically the law school I might just try to subtly work it into an essay, not base the essay solely on that fact. For instance "I first became interested in attending when I visited my cousin (who attended as an undergrad) and noticed how great the location of the campus is." Or something along those lines.


That probably couldn't hurt you at all, if nothing else it personalizes your application somewhat.


It's not going to help. At all


No, but it doesn't hurt like saying I love X because my cousin went there and he says it's the shit, plus I think I have a better chance of getting in since he went there.

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XxMVPxX
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby XxMVPxX » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:20 pm

chem wrote:
It's not going to help. At all


Just wondering, in your opinion would stating that I have a relative who attended this school in no way, shape, or form help me in any way?

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Kikero
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Kikero » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:27 pm

XxMVPxX wrote:
chem wrote:
It's not going to help. At all


Just wondering, in your opinion is having a relative who went to this school not worth stating while applying?


I don't necessarily think it's worth stating either, I was just saying that it wouldn't hurt you if you worded it like in your above post. I don't see how a school would care that you have a relative that went to their undergrad. Conventional wisdom says that numbers are all that really matter, but even for soft factors, having a relative who graduated from the school's undergraduate program isn't high up on the list.

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XxMVPxX
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby XxMVPxX » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:34 pm

Kikero wrote:
I don't necessarily think it's worth stating either, I was just saying that it wouldn't hurt you if you worded it like in your above post. I don't see how a school would care that you have a relative that went to their undergrad. Conventional wisdom says that numbers are all that really matter, but even for soft factors, having a relative who graduated from the school's undergraduate program isn't high up on the list.


I'll probably end up doing it in some subtle way like I did in the previous post, I mean it really can't hurt and can only help. It's not like they'd see it and think "How dare he try to use his cousin to get admitted here, DENIED!"

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Guchster
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Guchster » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:38 pm

XxMVPxX wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
When choosing a major, you should consider:
1. What you can get close to a 4.0 in.
2. What could get you a post-college job if you end up not going to law school for whatever reason.
(unfortunately, these are frequently mutually exclusive!)


The reason I chose business is because I was under the assumption that law schools would look favorably on someone who challenged them self with a tougher major as opposed to just being a psychology major. If someone has a 3.5 in business (which requires calculus, stat 1 & 2, accounting 1 & 2, etc.) is that akin to someone having like a 3.7 in psychology?


law school doesn't give one single fuck about rigor of curriculum. they want grades and lsat to make their USNWR pretty.

being a STEM major might helps with IP jobs, but not with actually getting into law school.

LoyalRebel
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby LoyalRebel » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:43 pm

I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.

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franklyscarlet
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby franklyscarlet » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:45 pm

LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.


maybe this is just my undergrad, but my history classes taught me a hell of a lot more about academic writing than my English classes.

LoyalRebel
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby LoyalRebel » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:49 pm

franklyscarlet wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.


maybe this is just my undergrad, but my history classes taught me a hell of a lot more about academic writing than my English classes.


Perhaps, but I don't really think that's communicated to employers when they see "B.A. in History" on a resume.

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chem
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby chem » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:49 pm

franklyscarlet wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.


maybe this is just my undergrad, but my history classes taught me a hell of a lot more about academic writing than my English classes.


I'd imagine most majors do a ton of writing. I know I do a disgusting amount as a STEM major. It shows through publications

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Crowing
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Crowing » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:51 pm

franklyscarlet wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.


maybe this is just my undergrad, but my history classes taught me a hell of a lot more about academic writing than my English classes.


I think a large part of that is just based on how good your professors are. I've had some pretty good experiences in both History and English but I'm partial to English myself (perhaps only because that's one of my majors and History isn't).

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Guchster
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Guchster » Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:54 pm

LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.



Major in what you want, because you like to do it and because you'll be successful. Don't do 'rigor' to alpha-out on admissions committee because like I said, they love their USNWR rankings, and will take a 3.9 in english over a 3.2 in Electrical Engineering almost any day--of course they're human beings, and as human beings they also live in fear of losing their jobs cuz their rankings drop or screw up their preftige. Talk to Emorystud Dean.

I was a science major and I hate English courses with a passion because I sucked at that type of writing. I got the highest grade possible in LRW; probs because legal writing is more similar to science writing/philosophy than a stupid english or history paper. I think this poaster is giving awful advice on how to strategically pick your major to best prepare for law school and law school admission. Do what you want, but if you're looking to prepare for legal writing, or impress litigators with the fact that you know how to write, don't major in English.

LoyalRebel
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby LoyalRebel » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:05 pm

Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.



Major in what you want, because you like to do it and because you'll be successful. Don't do 'rigor' to alpha-out on admissions committee because like I said, they love their USNWR rankings, and will take a 3.9 in english over a 3.2 in Electrical Engineering almost any day--of course they're human beings, and as human beings they also live in fear of losing their jobs cuz their rankings drop or screw up their preftige. Talk to Emorystud Dean.

I was a science major and I hate English courses with a passion because I sucked at that type of writing. I got the highest grade possible in LRW; probs because legal writing is more similar to science writing/philosophy than a stupid english or history paper. I think this poaster is giving awful advice on how to strategically pick your major to best prepare for law school and law school admission. Do what you want, but if you're looking to prepare for legal writing, or impress litigators with the fact that you know how to write, don't major in English.


You failed to explain what's bad about majoring in English.

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Guchster
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Guchster » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:08 pm

LoyalRebel wrote:
Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.



Major in what you want, because you like to do it and because you'll be successful. Don't do 'rigor' to alpha-out on admissions committee because like I said, they love their USNWR rankings, and will take a 3.9 in english over a 3.2 in Electrical Engineering almost any day--of course they're human beings, and as human beings they also live in fear of losing their jobs cuz their rankings drop or screw up their preftige. Talk to Emorystud Dean.

I was a science major and I hate English courses with a passion because I sucked at that type of writing. I got the highest grade possible in LRW; probs because legal writing is more similar to science writing/philosophy than a stupid english or history paper. I think this poaster is giving awful advice on how to strategically pick your major to best prepare for law school and law school admission. Do what you want, but if you're looking to prepare for legal writing, or impress litigators with the fact that you know how to write, don't major in English.


You failed to explain what's bad about majoring in English.


I think the whole point we've been trying to make is that there is nothing bad about it, and is not going to make an impact on admissions decision. The number is what matters.

Just GTFO with that "one of two best majors to prepare for law school." An english major is good for GPA, people who want to be writers, and people who enjoy doing it. It's shit for law school prep.

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chem
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby chem » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:14 pm

Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:
Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.



Major in what you want, because you like to do it and because you'll be successful. Don't do 'rigor' to alpha-out on admissions committee because like I said, they love their USNWR rankings, and will take a 3.9 in english over a 3.2 in Electrical Engineering almost any day--of course they're human beings, and as human beings they also live in fear of losing their jobs cuz their rankings drop or screw up their preftige. Talk to Emorystud Dean.

I was a science major and I hate English courses with a passion because I sucked at that type of writing. I got the highest grade possible in LRW; probs because legal writing is more similar to science writing/philosophy than a stupid english or history paper. I think this poaster is giving awful advice on how to strategically pick your major to best prepare for law school and law school admission. Do what you want, but if you're looking to prepare for legal writing, or impress litigators with the fact that you know how to write, don't major in English.


You failed to explain what's bad about majoring in English.


I think the whole point we've been trying to make is that there is nothing bad about it, and is not going to make an impact on admissions decision. The number is what matters.

Just GTFO with that "one of two best majors to prepare for law school." An english major is good for GPA, people who want to be writers, and people who enjoy doing it. It's shit for law school prep.


It is also ironic that it clearly says on OP's own link what majors had the highest acceptance rates. RC FTW

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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby bobbyh1919 » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:20 pm

Obviously adcomms are not idiots, and they know which majors are easy and which ones require more effort. That being said, I would much rather be a Poly Sci major with a 3.7 than an Engineering major with a 3.2 if I was getting ready to apply to law school. The former will have much more time to study for the LSAT, which is more important anyway.

If you have a passion for Engineering/Bio/Chem/etc. by all means do it. You need something that will hold your interest for 4 years. But be prepared that schools are not necessarily going to reward you for this because of how it effects rankings.

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Guchster
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Guchster » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:21 pm

chem wrote:It is also ironic that it clearly says on OP's own link what majors had the highest acceptance rates. RC FTW


correlation = causation, amirite?

LoyalRebel
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby LoyalRebel » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:23 pm

Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:
Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:I personally think it's ridiculous to pick a "fluff" major just to get a 4.0. Contrary to popular belief, law schools do not simply apply a formula to your numbers to determine who gets in. They read each file individually. Law school admissions committees are not idiots, they know an easy major when they see one.

In my opinion, the two best majors for law school are......

Accounting and English

Accounting is great if you want to do tax, business, transactional, or other related law. There is a lot of overlap between accounting and law, and you'll find that your understanding of corporate structure, partnerships, tax, and general business knowledge gets attention from prospective employers. It also provides a great "plan B" route if you decide against law school. However, it's one of the more difficult majors out there (depending on your school).

If there's one thing I've learned in law school, it's that Legal Writing is your most important 1L class. It's the main class that employers look at to determine if you're going to make an effective intern. Even if your legal writing grade isn't top notch, employers can still see that you have an English degree and know that you're a competent writer.



Major in what you want, because you like to do it and because you'll be successful. Don't do 'rigor' to alpha-out on admissions committee because like I said, they love their USNWR rankings, and will take a 3.9 in english over a 3.2 in Electrical Engineering almost any day--of course they're human beings, and as human beings they also live in fear of losing their jobs cuz their rankings drop or screw up their preftige. Talk to Emorystud Dean.

I was a science major and I hate English courses with a passion because I sucked at that type of writing. I got the highest grade possible in LRW; probs because legal writing is more similar to science writing/philosophy than a stupid english or history paper. I think this poaster is giving awful advice on how to strategically pick your major to best prepare for law school and law school admission. Do what you want, but if you're looking to prepare for legal writing, or impress litigators with the fact that you know how to write, don't major in English.


You failed to explain what's bad about majoring in English.


I think the whole point we've been trying to make is that there is nothing bad about it, and is not going to make an impact on admissions decision. The number is what matters.

Just GTFO with that "one of two best majors to prepare for law school." An english major is good for GPA, people who want to be writers, and people who enjoy doing it. It's shit for law school prep.


Woa there cowboy, calm down. You should make an effort to read what I said before resorting to provocative acronyms. First of all, when I recommended those two majors, I was not addressing the issue of law school admissions. I was addressing the issue of employability.

Second, it was my opinion. While I did not major in English, I would imagine that it teaches you to write correctly. This is good, and writing correctly helps with LRW, no?

Op asked for advice, and I gave it. I know we're all aspiring to be lawyers, but at least make legitimate arguments rather than just arguing for the hell of it.

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Guchster
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Guchster » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:40 pm

LoyalRebel wrote:Woa there cowboy (um..). You should make an effort to read what I said before resorting to provocative acronyms (rofld, but seriously gtfo). First of all, when I recommended those two majors, I was not addressing the issue of law school admissions. I was addressing the issue of employability.

Second, it was my opinion. While I did not major in English, I would imagine that it teaches you to write correctly. This is good, and writing correctly helps with LRW, no?


keeps sperging.

you can't be serious in asserting that English is more attractive at OCI/EIP (i.e., employability) than a science major. that crap doesn't even matter. by then it's all about grades/ you're ability to calm down you assburgerz. even then, with a hard science background you get nice avenues open up that aren't available to degrees in the humanities.

Well, its true that an English major writes in English. That is helpful. They write a lot in English developing bad habits of excessive, flowery language with an emphasis on syntax as much as content. The difference is that the science writer has to dig through databases through strategic searches to write a cogent argument that persuades the reader that her interpretation of the data is the correct- replace data with "statute" and you can hand me my money.

Your opinions are stupid and misleading for 0L poasters.

ETA: When 350/400 people in your class majored in English/History, you stand out for employers by majoring in something different. Just a shame that this difference won't help get you into lawl school in the first place.

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chem
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Re: Undergrad Major

Postby chem » Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:58 pm

Guchster wrote:
chem wrote:It is also ironic that it clearly says on OP's own link what majors had the highest acceptance rates. RC FTW


correlation = causation, amirite?


Touché, but all you can really do with to softs regarding admissions is discuss correlations

Edited for shit grammar. Hard to keep track of my words on the phone
Last edited by chem on Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Gail
Posts: 977
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 11:11 am

Re: Undergrad Major

Postby Gail » Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:03 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
XxMVPxX wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
When choosing a major, you should consider:
1. What you can get close to a 4.0 in.
2. What could get you a post-college job if you end up not going to law school for whatever reason.
(unfortunately, these are frequently mutually exclusive!)


The reason I chose business is because I was under the assumption that law schools would look favorably on someone who challenged them self with a tougher major as opposed to just being a psychology major. If someone has a 3.5 in business (which requires calculus, stat 1 & 2, accounting 1 & 2, etc.) is that akin to someone having like a 3.7 in psychology?
Since when is business a tough major? Average difficulty, I'd say.

Business might be useful for getting a job if law school doesn't work out, but it's not going to give you any kind of boost in admissions. Even engineers don't really get one, except for IP hiring.



Idk. I took a lot of math myself. Up to calculus. All business majors at my school did. That's a hell of a lot harder than a 20 page paper on Marie Antoinette if you ask me.

In descending order of difficulty.

Math
Engineering (of most kinds)
...
Sciences (Chemistry/Physics > Geography > Biology/Geology)
Business (MCS > Finance/Accounting > Managements)
Education
...
...
...
Philosophy/Psychology
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
English/History
Physical education


:lol:

LoyalRebel
Posts: 193
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:20 pm

Re: Undergrad Major

Postby LoyalRebel » Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:10 pm

Guchster wrote:
LoyalRebel wrote:Woa there cowboy (um..). You should make an effort to read what I said before resorting to provocative acronyms (rofld, but seriously gtfo). First of all, when I recommended those two majors, I was not addressing the issue of law school admissions. I was addressing the issue of employability.

Second, it was my opinion. While I did not major in English, I would imagine that it teaches you to write correctly. This is good, and writing correctly helps with LRW, no?


keeps sperging.

you can't be serious in asserting that English is more attractive at OCI/EIP (i.e., employability) than a science major. that crap doesn't even matter. by then it's all about grades/ you're ability to calm down you assburgerz. even then, with a hard science background you get nice avenues open up that aren't available to degrees in the humanities.

Well, its true that an English major writes in English. That is helpful. They write a lot in English developing bad habits of excessive, flowery language with an emphasis on syntax as much as content. The difference is that the science writer has to dig through databases through strategic searches to write a cogent argument that persuades the reader that her interpretation of the data is the correct- replace data with "statute" and you can hand me my money.

Your opinions are stupid and misleading for 0L poasters.

ETA: When 350/400 people in your class majored in English/History, you stand out for employers by majoring in something different. Just a shame that this difference won't help get you into lawl school in the first place.


You're acting really immature so I'm not going to argue with you. But I leave you with 2 things:

1. A science background is only attractive to something like patent law, whereas English appeals to a much broader scale of employers.

2. It's spelled "poster." Sorry, that was just bugging me.




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