Philosophy of Law

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joetheplumber
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Philosophy of Law

Postby joetheplumber » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:12 pm

Does anybody actually take classes like this in law school? How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc

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Grizz
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby Grizz » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:13 pm

Well almost nothing in law school is actually useful for getting a job, so philosophy of law is not much different in that respect.

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kalvano
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby kalvano » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:14 pm

Yes, they do, and the only way it helps get a job is by padding your GPA.

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bk1
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby bk1 » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:15 pm

joetheplumber wrote:How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc


How is this any different than other classes? Do you expect your interviewers to care about Marbury v. Madison or Hawkins v. McGee?

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Grizz
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby Grizz » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:16 pm

bk1 wrote:
joetheplumber wrote:How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc


How is this any different than other classes? Do you expect your interviewers to care about Marbury v. Madison or Hawkins v. McGee?

I'm working at a firm this summer that specializes in writ of mandamus law.

joetheplumber
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby joetheplumber » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:24 pm

bk1 wrote:
joetheplumber wrote:How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc


How is this any different than other classes? Do you expect your interviewers to care about Marbury v. Madison or Hawkins v. McGee?


I expect court cases like these to teach you about a rule of law that would be relevant to the job. Such as what is a contract and stuff. I don't expect Philosophy of Law to be anything useful unless you want to become a judge......

And also, i think these types of classes are the hardest. Does ppl think that this really pads your GPA

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Detrox
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby Detrox » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:42 pm

NYU has a strong program in this type of stuff due to their powerful faculty in Philosophy. It can set you up nicely for advanced degrees in legal theory or philosophy. Those in turn can set you up nicely for becoming an academic in that narrow field, or, much more likely, unemployment.

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Grizz
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby Grizz » Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:03 pm

joetheplumber wrote:
bk1 wrote:
joetheplumber wrote:How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc


How is this any different than other classes? Do you expect your interviewers to care about Marbury v. Madison or Hawkins v. McGee?


I expect court cases like these to teach you about a rule of law that would be relevant to the job. Such as what is a contract and stuff. I don't expect Philosophy of Law to be anything useful unless you want to become a judge......

And also, i think these types of classes are the hardest. Does ppl think that this really pads your GPA

If you've already made up your mind, why are you asking

They tend to be uncurved (profs handing out As).

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kalvano
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby kalvano » Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:26 am

joetheplumber wrote:And also, i think these types of classes are the hardest. Does ppl think that this really pads your GPA



Are you in law school now?

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romothesavior
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby romothesavior » Mon Jan 30, 2012 1:28 am

Grizz wrote:Well almost nothing in law school is actually useful for getting a job, so philosophy of law is not much different in that respect.

Word.

It's basically just interesting shit. That's all.

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Grizz
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby Grizz » Mon Jan 30, 2012 1:34 am

romothesavior wrote:
Grizz wrote:Well almost nothing in law school is actually useful for getting a job, so philosophy of law is not much different in that respect.

Word.

It's basically just interesting shit. That's all.

Except it's not that interesting.

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romothesavior
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby romothesavior » Mon Jan 30, 2012 1:37 am

Grizz wrote:
romothesavior wrote:
Grizz wrote:Well almost nothing in law school is actually useful for getting a job, so philosophy of law is not much different in that respect.

Word.

It's basically just interesting shit. That's all.

Except it's not that interesting.

I like that shit, but then again I was a derpy philosophy major.

joetheplumber
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby joetheplumber » Mon Jan 30, 2012 11:36 pm

Grizz wrote:
joetheplumber wrote:
bk1 wrote:
joetheplumber wrote:How does this help you get a job by learning legal formalism, realism, positivism, etc


How is this any different than other classes? Do you expect your interviewers to care about Marbury v. Madison or Hawkins v. McGee?


I expect court cases like these to teach you about a rule of law that would be relevant to the job. Such as what is a contract and stuff. I don't expect Philosophy of Law to be anything useful unless you want to become a judge......

And also, i think these types of classes are the hardest. Does ppl think that this really pads your GPA

If you've already made up your mind, why are you asking

They tend to be uncurved (profs handing out As).


Oh I'm just asking to see what other people think about these classes. Sort of like a poll test to see if others agree with me or not.
And for the person who asked me if i am in law school, i'm not. Still in UG but taking a course on this and its really boring to me and hard to understand.

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AreJay711
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby AreJay711 » Mon Jan 30, 2012 11:39 pm

Legal philosophy is some dry ass shit. Black letter stuff is way more interesting because you deal with actual problems and distinction that might potentially matter to someone.

sillyboots
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Re: Philosophy of Law

Postby sillyboots » Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:32 am

I think it's always worthwhile to engage in a philosophy class related to any discipline you're involved in. Any time you think a law sucks, or argue for a change in law you're recognizing some sort of philosophical underpinning for it. Practically, I think it's useful in helping you draw distinctions, categorize arguments, and think through arguments more quickly and accurately. More importantly, though, I think it will make you and your relationship to law a more honest and self-aware one. Recognizing, for example, that there are multiple ethical theories that support different aspects of criminal law and many of them aren't compatible allows you to see both that people in general are ethically dissonant, employing different moral reasoning in different situations, but also that almost no matter how you tweak it, something is going to suck about criminal law. I just think there's some value there, though I know some people really hate philosophy crap and would rather not engage. If you have half an interest, I think it can do good things for you.




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