Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
mrloblaw
Posts: 534
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby mrloblaw » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:55 pm

headandshoulderos wrote:
InGoodFaith wrote:
headandshoulderos wrote:ya but come on dude. there are no schools with 100 brilliant people. maybe yale or stanford. usually at least a good %age of the bottom are lazy or lazier or not as talented/smart.


Your argument is fallacious.


Why? You really think everybody in law school is equivalent and exam produced rantings are arbitrary?


I think this is largely the case. I haven't ever had a chance to read classmates' exam answers, but it's not like the kids in the bottom 10% seem that much less knowledgeable on the subject matter. Law-school level logical and legal analysis is absurdly simple, and I can't believe that enough people are getting 2+2=4 level questions wrong to generate a meaningful curve.

It's either that, or being top 10% really does mean that you're one of only 7 or 8 people in the class who derived the proper one-sentence take home point from Intl Shoe. I choose to err on the side of believing that it is not the case that 90% of my classmates are legally retarded.

User avatar
20130312
Posts: 3842
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2011 8:53 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby 20130312 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:04 pm

headandshoulderos wrote:
InGoodFaith wrote:
headandshoulderos wrote:ya but come on dude. there are no schools with 100 brilliant people. maybe yale or stanford. usually at least a good %age of the bottom are lazy or lazier or not as talented/smart.


Your argument is fallacious.


Why? You really think everybody in law school is equivalent and exam produced rantings are arbitrary?


Yes, this is exactly what I said :roll:

headandshoulderos
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby headandshoulderos » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:07 pm

Well, you must go to a better school than I.

User avatar
20130312
Posts: 3842
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2011 8:53 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby 20130312 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:13 pm

Damnit, Internet. Where is the font for sarcasm?

Luboman411
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:24 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby Luboman411 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:14 pm

Ughhh...please, OP, tell me that you're not going to be working at my firm. Please. This is the type of zero-sum, black-and-white, screw-those-lazy-miscreants attitude that makes working with the likes of you a nightmare. I've had enough of it at law school. The fact that this thought even crossed your mind means that you are and will be an unpleasant co-worker. I've had a few years of work experience before law school and, believe me, this type of callow outlook on life seeps through the pores and fellow co-workers--the less self-inflated amongst us--will despise you for it. Maybe even some partners (those who themselves are attuned, that is) who have control over you will pick up on it. So watch it.

In the working world there will come a time when you realize you are not the special little snowflake that you thought you were in school. That is, if you're a K-through-JD'er. If you have had working experience, just think back on how oddly fellow co-workers acted around you. This attitude, exemplified right here, may be the reason why people did not like you.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273127
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:39 pm

This thread represents what is wrong in the legal profession and explains why lawyers are statistically one of the most dissatisfied professions: ego, purely selfish ambition and myopic thought.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
TaipeiMort
Posts: 874
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 11:51 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:40 pm

OP:

A problem with your argument is that ex ante, when you made the decision to go to your law school, with a great LRAP, you made the decision to buy essentially a failure insurance policy (LRAP).

Now after you've won out, you are complaining that you had to pay for the insurance, and that others who have failed are taking advantage of it.

You would have a real complaint if you contracted out of LRAP, received a lower price for education, and then had the money you are giving to your failed classmates deducted from your bank account. Maybe you should have made this bargain with your Dean before starting.

User avatar
TaipeiMort
Posts: 874
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 11:51 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:50 pm

On the issue of "lazy, dumb people ending up in PI." I think your argument fails at top schools. I am one of the dumbest people in my class at UChicago and I got a bunch of SA offers. Some of the smartest, most capable people in my class failed to get big law because they picked the wrong market (Chicago) or didn't max out their bids, or are naturally not self-promoting. I feel extremely blessed to have landed a couple of great summer opportunities and can't imagine using my blessings as a bully pulpit to bash others.

It is probably more real at the lower T1s where students are essentially taking on a 10% gamble to get big law. I disagree with the notion that at these schools with 90% of students shooting for PI that they were mostly PI-focused before failing to get a firm. At these T1s, I can see how the winning students might have a gripe, as their academic ability it probably much different than those at the bottom.

User avatar
Bronte
Posts: 2128
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:44 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby Bronte » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:54 pm

mrloblaw wrote:Law-school level logical and legal analysis is absurdly simple, and I can't believe that enough people are getting 2+2=4 level questions wrong to generate a meaningful curve


This is such crap. Have you ever considered that: (1) if you did do well, it just comes to you more easily than it does to others; or (2) if you did not do well, the reason you think it's "absurdly simple" is because you don't understand it at a high enough level to do well?

User avatar
IAFG
Posts: 6665
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:26 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby IAFG » Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:57 pm

I have been posting on TLS since March 28, 2008. I've been lurking or posting for four years now. I've surely read thousands of threads started by law students, lawyers or 0Ls.

This is hands-down, no contest, the douchiest, most disgusting thread I have ever participated in. Truly.

headandshoulderos
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby headandshoulderos » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:08 pm

Luboman411 wrote:Ughhh...please, OP, tell me that you're not going to be working at my firm. Please. This is the type of zero-sum, black-and-white, screw-those-lazy-miscreants attitude that makes working with the likes of you a nightmare. I've had enough of it at law school. The fact that this thought even crossed your mind means that you are and will be an unpleasant co-worker. I've had a few years of work experience before law school and, believe me, this type of callow outlook on life seeps through the pores and fellow co-workers--the less self-inflated amongst us--will despise you for it. Maybe even some partners (those who themselves are attuned, that is) who have control over you will pick up on it. So watch it.

In the working world there will come a time when you realize you are not the special little snowflake that you thought you were in school. That is, if you're a K-through-JD'er. If you have had working experience, just think back on how oddly fellow co-workers acted around you. This attitude, exemplified right here, may be the reason why people did not like you.


I agree with the K-JD thing. The maturity gap is striking. Going off on your own after college and working is a very big right of passage, that most of the JD's out there haven't had. That's the most annoying part about law school -- all the kids that haven't grown up yet. Usually, if tehre's a person who has worked or done something between K-JD I've found they are normal people.

User avatar
observationalist
Posts: 472
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 12:55 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby observationalist » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:09 pm

paul_m86 wrote:
BeenDidThat wrote:Yeah, I'm sure we'll feel really bad that maybe a week's paycheck per year will go to subsidizing our colleagues. Boo fucking hoo.


Oh, so you wouldn't mind if I took a paycheck or two of yours every year? Cool! I will make sure it goes to a charity ... or ... something.

And as noted before, a lot of those top performers are paying less than full price anywho.


At my school, the average scholarship for people getting biglaw might be $15-$20 year. Which means they are still going to be dealing with insane debt.


OP does raise a good point about the fact that even scholarship recipients are still going to have debt levels that are higher than they should be. If you want to really focus your anger at something worthwhile, consider what amount of your tuition has likely gone towards providing services that directly benefit you and your peers (or if you truly are only self-interested, then just the services that benefit you). Putting aside LRAP then, you essentially received some education, perhaps some training, and a sorting mechanism that signaled your employability for an SA position and perhaps a full-time gig that will allow you to service your debts without suffering economic hardship after graduation. It is really questionable whether all the money you and your colleagues are paying is needed to provide you with that fairly basic set of services.

How much of what you paid is going to subsidize faculty scholarship that provides no direct service and adds no direct value to your education, training, or dreams of prestige and/or financial security? That figure certainly makes up a much higher percentage of what you paid than what LRAP will end up paying out to the handful of your classmates who end up qualifying for the program. If you're really looking for something to get self-righteous about, it might be worth asking the administration to stop allowing tuition dollars to fund scholarship. I've seen some brilliant professors obtaining grants to fund nearly all of their work; a shift to that model would help lower the cost for both admirable people like you and your slacker peers with no sense of direction and a need to validate their job prospects as being what they wanted all along.

mrloblaw
Posts: 534
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby mrloblaw » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:22 pm

Bronte wrote:
mrloblaw wrote:Law-school level logical and legal analysis is absurdly simple, and I can't believe that enough people are getting 2+2=4 level questions wrong to generate a meaningful curve


This is such crap. Have you ever considered that: (1) if you did do well, it just comes to you more easily than it does to others; or (2) if you did not do well, the reason you think it's "absurdly simple" is because you don't understand it at a high enough level to do well?

You could be right, but I respectfully disagree.

Honestly, I think that I did well as a 1L because I completely ignored the metaphysical pontification about THE LAW abundant in almost every case I read. The people I know who struggled were those who tried too hard to grapple with subtle distinctions made by the court which weren't that necessary for the black letter holding and thus failed to focus sufficiently on the crucial parts of the cases.

In short, I know lots of people who are smarter than me who treated law school exams as if they were mathematical proofs, with it being incredibly important to understand every sentence, and ended up median as a result of that methodology. Law school is all about sifting through a 40 page SCOTUS opinion to find the most essential three or four sentences of justification for the black letter holding, and this skill isn't all that difficult to master. Hell, if you can't master it, Westlaw/Lexis usually does it for you pretty well. This is the root of my argument that law school grades are an utter farce.

The people who do well in law school are not those who work hardest, or even those who are smartest, but those who master (edit: the) facile nature of legal analysis before fall exams ruin their 1L gpas. This is one of several things wrong with OP's argument.

headandshoulderos
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby headandshoulderos » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:35 pm

mrloblaw wrote:
Bronte wrote:
mrloblaw wrote:Law-school level logical and legal analysis is absurdly simple, and I can't believe that enough people are getting 2+2=4 level questions wrong to generate a meaningful curve


This is such crap. Have you ever considered that: (1) if you did do well, it just comes to you more easily than it does to others; or (2) if you did not do well, the reason you think it's "absurdly simple" is because you don't understand it at a high enough level to do well?

You could be right, but I respectfully disagree.

Honestly, I think that I did well as a 1L because I completely ignored the metaphysical pontification about THE LAW abundant in almost every case I read. The people I know who struggled were those who tried too hard to grapple with subtle distinctions made by the court which weren't that necessary for the black letter holding and thus failed to focus sufficiently on the crucial parts of the cases.

In short, I know lots of people who are smarter than me who treated law school exams as if they were mathematical proofs, with it being incredibly important to understand every sentence, and ended up median as a result of that methodology. Law school is all about sifting through a 40 page SCOTUS opinion to find the most essential three or four sentences of justification for the black letter holding, and this skill isn't all that difficult to master. Hell, if you can't master it, Westlaw/Lexis usually does it for you pretty well. This is the root of my argument that law school grades are an utter farce.

The people who do well in law school are not those who work hardest, or even those who are smartest, but those who master (edit: the) facile nature of legal analysis before fall exams ruin their 1L gpas. This is one of several things wrong with OP's argument.


You know, professional basketball players make playing ball look easy too.

User avatar
BruceWayne
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby BruceWayne » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:20 pm

headandshoulderos wrote:You know, professional basketball players make playing ball look easy too.


They make it look easy, but when you try to replicate what they are doing you cannot accomplish it. There's a clear distinction in skill. MJ can dunk from the free throw line but I can't. Law school grades/exams aren't like that. Have you ever looked at different law school exam answers? If you do, it will cause you to lose a lot of faith in the grading system. Sure there's a significant difference between a few very high scoring exams and a few really low scoring ones (but even there, it's mostly a distinction of amount; the first thing I noticed is that no one is really saying anything different. It's just that the people getting A+s are saying 30 pages worth of stuff, while the C's are saying 8-10 pages worth). Most students' exams look amazingly similar--even when the grade of one is an A- while the grade of another is a B. Frankly, I'm not even sure how many professors grade exams when I compare my classmates answers. For the most part everyone is saying the same thing. I will say that a common technique for people who get high scores seems to be to answer the question asked, but then to change the facts and say "but if this were the case then this would be the answer" after they finish answering the original question. They also tend to "topic dump" after they answer a question; they end up inserting pages and pages from their outlines into the exam. I think that's one of the reasons why high scoring people often make outlines from scratch that are 50+ pages etc. They don't necessarily know all the info but they end up dropping statements straight from the professor's mouth (streamed in class during their furious 100wpm note typing) into the exam--an excellent way of differentiating ones' self when it would otherwise be very difficult. For the most part professors have a hell of job; trying to distinguish what is not meaningfully distinguishable. I don't understand why people think that this is so unlikely/impossible when you consider the admissions process.

The whole admission process is designed to accept students who are materially similar to one another. Is it so shocking that when similar people get together and take a similar exam they give similar answers? The exams exist to give employers some way of readily distinguishing between people who really aren't that distinguishable from one another. It's part of the reason why, when the economy was good, firms didn't mind digging very deep into the class at top schools. It's also why HYS started pulling back on the fine gradations in exam grades.

User avatar
NinerFan
Posts: 482
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:51 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby NinerFan » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:37 pm

BruceWayne wrote:
headandshoulderos wrote:You know, professional basketball players make playing ball look easy too.


They make it look easy, but when you try to replicate what they are doing you cannot accomplish it. There's a clear distinction in skill. MJ can dunk from the free throw line but I can't. Law school grades/exams aren't like that. Have you ever looked at different law school exam answers? If you do, it will cause you to lose a lot of faith in the grading system. Sure there's a significant difference between a few very high scoring exams and a few really low scoring ones (but even there, it's mostly a distinction of amount; the first thing I noticed is that no one is really saying anything different. It's just that the people getting A+s are saying 30 pages worth of stuff, while the C's are saying 8-10 pages worth). Most students' exams look amazingly similar--even when the grade of one is an A- while the grade of another is a B. Frankly, I'm not even sure how many professors grade exams when I compare my classmates answers. For the most part everyone is saying the same thing. I will say that a common technique for people who get high scores seems to be to answer the question asked, but then to change the facts and say "but if this were the case then this would be the answer" after they finish answering the original question. They also tend to "topic dump" after they answer a question; they end up inserting pages and pages from their outlines into the exam. I think that's one of the reasons why high scoring people often make outlines from scratch that are 50+ pages etc. They don't necessarily know all the info but they end up dropping statements straight from the professor's mouth (streamed in class during their furious 100wpm note typing) into the exam--an excellent way of differentiating ones' self when it would otherwise be very difficult. For the most part professors have a hell of job; trying to distinguish what is not meaningfully distinguishable. I don't understand why people think that this is so unlikely/impossible when you consider the admissions process.

The whole admission process is designed to accept students who are materially similar to one another. Is it so shocking that when similar people get together and take a similar exam they give similar answers? The exams exist to give employers some way of readily distinguishing between people who really aren't that distinguishable from one another. It's part of the reason why, when the economy was good, firms didn't mind digging very deep into the class at top schools. It's also why HYS started pulling back on the fine gradations in exam grades.


A friend and I compared our exams after finals. We agreed that we had essentially said the same thing. When the grades came out, they had gotten an A and I got a B+. We came to the same conclusion on the hypo and identified the same issues. I guess they just.... wrote or presented it better?

mrloblaw
Posts: 534
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby mrloblaw » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:46 pm

NinerFan wrote:
BruceWayne wrote:
headandshoulderos wrote:You know, professional basketball players make playing ball look easy too.


They make it look easy, but when you try to replicate what they are doing you cannot accomplish it. There's a clear distinction in skill. MJ can dunk from the free throw line but I can't. Law school grades/exams aren't like that. Have you ever looked at different law school exam answers? If you do, it will cause you to lose a lot of faith in the grading system. Sure there's a significant difference between a few very high scoring exams and a few really low scoring ones (but even there, it's mostly a distinction of amount; the first thing I noticed is that no one is really saying anything different. It's just that the people getting A+s are saying 30 pages worth of stuff, while the C's are saying 8-10 pages worth). Most students' exams look amazingly similar--even when the grade of one is an A- while the grade of another is a B. Frankly, I'm not even sure how many professors grade exams when I compare my classmates answers. For the most part everyone is saying the same thing. I will say that a common technique for people who get high scores seems to be to answer the question asked, but then to change the facts and say "but if this were the case then this would be the answer" after they finish answering the original question. They also tend to "topic dump" after they answer a question; they end up inserting pages and pages from their outlines into the exam. I think that's one of the reasons why high scoring people often make outlines from scratch that are 50+ pages etc. They don't necessarily know all the info but they end up dropping statements straight from the professor's mouth (streamed in class during their furious 100wpm note typing) into the exam--an excellent way of differentiating ones' self when it would otherwise be very difficult. For the most part professors have a hell of job; trying to distinguish what is not meaningfully distinguishable. I don't understand why people think that this is so unlikely/impossible when you consider the admissions process.

The whole admission process is designed to accept students who are materially similar to one another. Is it so shocking that when similar people get together and take a similar exam they give similar answers? The exams exist to give employers some way of readily distinguishing between people who really aren't that distinguishable from one another. It's part of the reason why, when the economy was good, firms didn't mind digging very deep into the class at top schools. It's also why HYS started pulling back on the fine gradations in exam grades.


A friend and I compared our exams after finals. We agreed that we had essentially said the same thing. When the grades came out, they had gotten an A and I got a B+. We came to the same conclusion on the hypo and identified the same issues. I guess they just.... wrote or presented it better?


My example was even more harrowing, I think. In at least one class, I took the same exam, and gave substantively the same answers as my classmates, except that I did not finish. I left probably 15% of the exam points on the table, not remotely addressing the issues in the question. This is the only meaningful difference I could see between my exam and those of everyone else, and as a result, I concluded that I must have finished slightly below median at best (probably B-).

Grade difference? I got an A and most of them took their median B-range grades.

User avatar
dailygrind
Posts: 19639
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 11:08 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby dailygrind » Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:05 pm

I don't think I've ever compared my exam with anyone else's, but I've been pretty good at calling my grades in advance based on my understanding of the material.

headandshoulderos
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby headandshoulderos » Tue Nov 29, 2011 7:34 pm

so i have a multiple choice exam coming up. are you saying everybody will get basically the same score?

ToTransferOrNot
Posts: 1928
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 12:45 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby ToTransferOrNot » Tue Nov 29, 2011 7:36 pm

headandshoulderos wrote:so i have a multiple choice exam coming up. are you saying everybody will get basically the same score?


In the one multiple choice exam I had in law school (was my lowest grade by far, too) the difference between the As and the medians was really slim (handful of questions). Obviously multiple choice exams have an objective basis, but the margin is slim enough that a lot of the outcome is going to come down to "who was the luckier guesser".

User avatar
paul_m86
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:20 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby paul_m86 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 7:55 pm

dailygrind wrote:I don't think I've ever compared my exam with anyone else's, but I've been pretty good at calling my grades in advance based on my understanding of the material.


All of my grades have fallen within an extremely narrow band. I don't know how much luck is in play but 80 percent of my 1L grades were one score, 10 percent were the next lowest score, and 10 percent were the next highest score.

User avatar
vanwinkle
Posts: 9740
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:02 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby vanwinkle » Tue Nov 29, 2011 7:59 pm

Topic has nothing to do with legal employment, just law schools and their alumni. Moved.

User avatar
paul_m86
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:20 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby paul_m86 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:01 pm

observationalist wrote:
paul_m86 wrote:
BeenDidThat wrote:Yeah, I'm sure we'll feel really bad that maybe a week's paycheck per year will go to subsidizing our colleagues. Boo fucking hoo.


Oh, so you wouldn't mind if I took a paycheck or two of yours every year? Cool! I will make sure it goes to a charity ... or ... something.

And as noted before, a lot of those top performers are paying less than full price anywho.


At my school, the average scholarship for people getting biglaw might be $15-$20 year. Which means they are still going to be dealing with insane debt.


OP does raise a good point about the fact that even scholarship recipients are still going to have debt levels that are higher than they should be. If you want to really focus your anger at something worthwhile, consider what amount of your tuition has likely gone towards providing services that directly benefit you and your peers (or if you truly are only self-interested, then just the services that benefit you). Putting aside LRAP then, you essentially received some education, perhaps some training, and a sorting mechanism that signaled your employability for an SA position and perhaps a full-time gig that will allow you to service your debts without suffering economic hardship after graduation. It is really questionable whether all the money you and your colleagues are paying is needed to provide you with that fairly basic set of services.

How much of what you paid is going to subsidize faculty scholarship that provides no direct service and adds no direct value to your education, training, or dreams of prestige and/or financial security? That figure certainly makes up a much higher percentage of what you paid than what LRAP will end up paying out to the handful of your classmates who end up qualifying for the program. If you're really looking for something to get self-righteous about, it might be worth asking the administration to stop allowing tuition dollars to fund scholarship. I've seen some brilliant professors obtaining grants to fund nearly all of their work; a shift to that model would help lower the cost for both admirable people like you and your slacker peers with no sense of direction and a need to validate their job prospects as being what they wanted all along.


I've found your posts very insightful. Thanks for your contributions, especially in regards to how high numbers people with scholarships may be being subsidized by low-numbers people without scholarships. That's definitely another way of looking at it.

The insurance as LRAP point that somebody else made was a good one too.

Also, in regard to the people who think that I'm saying that the most intelligent people get the highest scores: that is obviously not the case. If law school grades do reflect intelligence, it's not in the conventional sense, but more in the sense about how quickly one can adapt to a new system in a stressful environment. I think that, along with hard work, and maybe a little bit of a luck thrown in, does a good job of explaining law school grades.

Also, an interesting question might be to ask how URMs fit into this. They certainly perform worse than average as a group considering they get into their respective schools with lower numbers. I'm wondering if scholarship money and firm diversity hiring makes up for this deficit, or whether URMs might be, in a way, subsidizing non-URMs.

User avatar
dailygrind
Posts: 19639
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 11:08 am

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby dailygrind » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:05 pm

Thin ice.

headandshoulderos
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: Are successful/smart/hardworking students subsidizing others

Postby headandshoulderos » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:10 pm

Wow, very gradual and elaborate AA flame...




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests