Undergrad Physics for IP

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expelliarmus
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:04 pm

Undergrad Physics for IP

Postby expelliarmus » Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:50 am

I am currently a junior studying physics and philosophy at a top 20 private institution. I picked my majors before knowing that I am going to law school.
Looking back, is physics a good choice for IP?
My concentration in my major is astrophysics. Do you need an MS or PhD for physics? Or do you need something more practical - say Electrical Engineering?

Thanks!

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yeast master
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Re: Undergrad Physics for IP

Postby yeast master » Thu Nov 03, 2011 1:12 am

A partner at an IP firm put it this way: "99 out of 100 firms will hire an electrical engineer. 1 out of 100 firms will hire a physicist." That's probably overstating it, but it's true that firms aren't all that interested in a physics BS, relatively speaking. A physics BS can get an IP job, but it's an uphill climb. If you're set on IP law, I would either switch your major to EE if that's practical, or if not, get a MSEE. That would put you in a pretty good position. Even better, work as an engineer for a while, which would give you an opportunity to see if that career is for you and would make you more marketable on the IP law job market if you did decide to go to law school.

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expelliarmus
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:04 pm

Re: Undergrad Physics for IP

Postby expelliarmus » Thu Nov 03, 2011 11:24 am

yeast master wrote:A partner at an IP firm put it this way: "99 out of 100 firms will hire an electrical engineer. 1 out of 100 firms will hire a physicist." That's probably overstating it, but it's true that firms aren't all that interested in a physics BS, relatively speaking. A physics BS can get an IP job, but it's an uphill climb. If you're set on IP law, I would either switch your major to EE if that's practical, or if not, get a MSEE. That would put you in a pretty good position. Even better, work as an engineer for a while, which would give you an opportunity to see if that career is for you and would make you more marketable on the IP law job market if you did decide to go to law school.


Thank you for your advice. I don't think I can switch my major right now, because it's sort of late - and I have finished 90% of the class my physics degree requires. And I literally have taken none EE classes so far - except when they overlap with physics.
In that case, I will just go to law school as originally planned, and then will probably not go into patent law if the undergrad degree is not sufficient.




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