Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
wolverinelove11
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 9:33 pm

Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby wolverinelove11 » Sat Jul 23, 2011 9:50 pm

*
Last edited by wolverinelove11 on Fri Sep 02, 2011 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

random5483
Posts: 684
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 8:17 pm

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby random5483 » Sat Jul 23, 2011 10:28 pm

Disclaimer: I am a 2L.


From what I have been told, being a few years older will not disadvantage you (ie. graduating at 30). I can't say the same for someone graduating in their mid 30s (ie. not sure).

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13905
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:00 am

I am kind of interested in this as well. I'll be 35 when I graduate, but I look quite a bit younger than my age. My parents both looked young--my dad is 63 and could pass for mid-late 40s, and I'm 31 and can pass for 25 easily. Do firms actually see your birthday anywhere during the first stages of the job application/OCI process?

User avatar
typ3
Posts: 1362
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:04 am

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby typ3 » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:11 am

rinkrat19 wrote:I am kind of interested in this as well. I'll be 35 when I graduate, but I look quite a bit younger than my age. My parents both looked young--my dad is 63 and could pass for mid-late 40s, and I'm 31 and can pass for 25 easily. Do firms actually see your birthday anywhere during the first stages of the job application/OCI process?


They won't know your birthday.. but it's not hard to tell someone's age by the years they graduated high school / college.

However it's not as much your age that will be held over your head but your life commitments.

25-26 year olds are likely to be unmarried and have no kids. Obviously as people get older they are more likely to have these commitments. Big Law is always looking for young fresh law school grads to work 70 hours a week for 52 weeks a year. You're less desirable if you can only work 50 hours a week because of children and a wife ball and chain at home .
Last edited by typ3 on Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13905
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:13 am

typ3 wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:I am kind of interested in this as well. I'll be 35 when I graduate, but I look quite a bit younger than my age. My parents both looked young--my dad is 63 and could pass for mid-late 40s, and I'm 31 and can pass for 25 easily. Do firms actually see your birthday anywhere during the first stages of the job application/OCI process?


They won't know your birthday.. but it's not hard to tell someone's age by the years they graduated high school / college.

Oh, derp. :P Somehow I didn't think of that.

User avatar
Heartford
Posts: 430
Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:02 pm

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby Heartford » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:46 am

OP, I'm a 2L in the age range to which you refer. My understanding is that it probably won't hurt, and might actually help since you'll have more work experience/other credentials than the "k through JD" crowd. There's obviously a ceiling somewhere though, and I assume that firms might start to raise an eyebrow at candidates who are 33 or 34+, partially for the reasons already mentioned in this thread. It's also just universally awkward when the entry-level guy in the office is older than all the seasoned associates. That might not be fair, but it still must sometimes affect hiring decisions.

User avatar
Icculus
Posts: 1421
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:02 am

Re: Biglaw at Non-Trad. Age

Postby Icculus » Sun Jul 24, 2011 2:02 am

OP, take a look a these two threads, some of these questions have been answered. From what I can see, it really depends on the situation, firm, reason for starting school at a later age. While I agree with many that there is eventually a ceiling, I don't think one can say with certainty what it is. Even graduating at 33-34 (my situation) in theory you still have the potential to offer a firm 30+ years of employment. Graduating late 30s early 40s may be when it becomes very difficult. In the 3rd yr litigator thread I specifically asked about age, and he seemed to think that anything mid 30s or younger would not be too difficult to overcome.

I also don't know how to embed a link with just the "view topic" piece.

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=143047&start=50

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=82732&p=3871403#p3871403




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests