UNC Law Class of 2019

(housing, friendships, future exams, all things 2019)

Where are you from?

North Carolina
8
67%
The South
2
17%
Mid-west
0
No votes
Northeast
1
8%
The West
1
8%
 
Total votes: 12

BlackAndOrange84
Posts: 101
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:06 am

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby BlackAndOrange84 » Fri Jul 08, 2016 6:49 pm

bookofblue wrote:A few things:

(1) bankruptcy, secured transactions, banking law, nonprofit orgs, health/finance, and construction law are not your typical "corporate" subjects that are practiced in biglaw. Bankruptcy is very focused on commercial (i.e. individual Ch. 7 and 13) matters, not Ch. 11 corporate (though there may be a class taught by an adjunct). Secured transactions is heavily commercial based, though is important conceptually for larger corporate matters. The final three are regulatory or litigation focused. IBT you are right - overstated my point.
(2) Banking law is pretty specific. It is more corporate related, but not in the since of biglaw practices. Again, highly regulatory, not transactional.
(3) The banking journal, and Lisa Broome, are fantastic. Given Charlotte as a large merchant banking hub, the focus there could be highly beneficial if you like it. But it is NOT investment banking focused. Very much focused on depository institutions.
(4) The community dev. clinic is great, but nonprofit focused. If you want to do transactional biglaw, it is not the same, though might be helpful.


The context here is that UNC places really well in NC, which means its focused on more middle market subjects that most UNC grads go into. Word on the street is the new Dean is trying to change that and expand the curriculum to more M&A / biglaw-centric transactional stuff, so this could change.


Point (1) is false as to bankruptcy. About half the standard class is on Chapter 11, and the coverage is more than adequate. Spending time on individual bankruptcy is a natural and maybe essential way to be introduced to the bankruptcy concepts needed to dive into restructurings. Also, restructuring occurs in the shadow of Chapter 7 liquidation and is affected by how things would play out in liquidation (best interest of creditors test). Prof. Jacoby, a tenured professor, teaches a business bankruptcy seminar focusing on restructuring.

Generally, you're right that class offerings for "biglaw transactional work" (which you construe pretty narrowly) are a bit thin. But so what? With few exceptions, class selection doesn't matter. Classes don't prepare you for practice. You learn on the job. Nor is it often that classes get you or qualify you for a job. If you're able to transfer out of UNC for a school like Harvard, it's not because you want to lock down a "biglaw transactional" job in NYC or to take class offerings that will prepare you for such a job, which is easily obtained from the top of the class at UNC. You want that sweet prestige or to have a better shot at academia or unicorn-type jobs, maybe all of the above. Anything else is window dressing you're using to deceive yourself or others about your motivations.
Last edited by BlackAndOrange84 on Fri Jul 08, 2016 7:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
HangingAround
Posts: 86
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 1:21 pm

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby HangingAround » Fri Jul 08, 2016 7:24 pm

BlackAndOrange84 wrote:
bookofblue wrote:A few things:

(1) bankruptcy, secured transactions, banking law, nonprofit orgs, health/finance, and construction law are not your typical "corporate" subjects that are practiced in biglaw. Bankruptcy is very focused on commercial (i.e. individual Ch. 7 and 13) matters, not Ch. 11 corporate (though there may be a class taught by an adjunct). Secured transactions is heavily commercial based, though is important conceptually for larger corporate matters. The final three are regulatory or litigation focused. IBT you are right - overstated my point.
(2) Banking law is pretty specific. It is more corporate related, but not in the since of biglaw practices. Again, highly regulatory, not transactional.
(3) The banking journal, and Lisa Broome, are fantastic. Given Charlotte as a large merchant banking hub, the focus there could be highly beneficial if you like it. But it is NOT investment banking focused. Very much focused on depository institutions.
(4) The community dev. clinic is great, but nonprofit focused. If you want to do transactional biglaw, it is not the same, though might be helpful.


The context here is that UNC places really well in NC, which means its focused on more middle market subjects that most UNC grads go into. Word on the street is the new Dean is trying to change that and expand the curriculum to more M&A / biglaw-centric transactional stuff, so this could change.


Point (1) is false as to bankruptcy. About half the standard class is on Chapter 11, and the coverage is more than adequate. Spending time on individual bankruptcy is a natural and maybe essential way to be introduced to the bankruptcy concepts needed to dive into restructurings. Also, restructuring occurs in the shadow of Chapter 7 liquidation and is affected by how things would play out in liquidation (best interest of creditors test). Prof. Jacoby, a tenured professor, teaches a business bankruptcy seminar focusing on restructuring.

Generally, you're right that class offerings for "biglaw transactional work" (which you construe pretty narrowly) are a bit thin. But so what? With few exceptions, class selection doesn't matter. Classes don't prepare you for practice. You learn on the job. Nor is it often that classes get you or qualify you for a job. If you're able to transfer out of UNC for a school like Harvard, it's not because you want to lock down a "biglaw transactional" job in NYC or to take class offerings that will prepare you for such a job, which are easily obtained from the top of the class at UNC. You want that sweet prestige or to have a better shot at academia or unicorn-type jobs, maybe all of the above. Anything else is window dressing you're using to deceive yourself or others about your motivations.


Thanks you two, nice to know more.

For anyone who didn't hear, UNC just passed its previous Annual Fund record by 20%! Alumni seem quite excited about Dean Brinkley and the future of the school.

http://www.law.unc.edu/news/2016/07/01/ ... -fund-mil/

bookofblue
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 10:09 am

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby bookofblue » Fri Jul 08, 2016 9:11 pm

BlackAndOrange84 wrote:
bookofblue wrote:A few things:

(1) bankruptcy, secured transactions, banking law, nonprofit orgs, health/finance, and construction law are not your typical "corporate" subjects that are practiced in biglaw. Bankruptcy is very focused on commercial (i.e. individual Ch. 7 and 13) matters, not Ch. 11 corporate (though there may be a class taught by an adjunct). Secured transactions is heavily commercial based, though is important conceptually for larger corporate matters. The final three are regulatory or litigation focused. IBT you are right - overstated my point.
(2) Banking law is pretty specific. It is more corporate related, but not in the since of biglaw practices. Again, highly regulatory, not transactional.
(3) The banking journal, and Lisa Broome, are fantastic. Given Charlotte as a large merchant banking hub, the focus there could be highly beneficial if you like it. But it is NOT investment banking focused. Very much focused on depository institutions.
(4) The community dev. clinic is great, but nonprofit focused. If you want to do transactional biglaw, it is not the same, though might be helpful.


The context here is that UNC places really well in NC, which means its focused on more middle market subjects that most UNC grads go into. Word on the street is the new Dean is trying to change that and expand the curriculum to more M&A / biglaw-centric transactional stuff, so this could change.


Point (1) is false as to bankruptcy. About half the standard class is on Chapter 11, and the coverage is more than adequate. Spending time on individual bankruptcy is a natural and maybe essential way to be introduced to the bankruptcy concepts needed to dive into restructurings. Also, restructuring occurs in the shadow of Chapter 7 liquidation and is affected by how things would play out in liquidation (best interest of creditors test). Prof. Jacoby, a tenured professor, teaches a business bankruptcy seminar focusing on restructuring.

Generally, you're right that class offerings for "biglaw transactional work" (which you construe pretty narrowly) are a bit thin. But so what? With few exceptions, class selection doesn't matter. Classes don't prepare you for practice. You learn on the job. Nor is it often that classes get you or qualify you for a job. If you're able to transfer out of UNC for a school like Harvard, it's not because you want to lock down a "biglaw transactional" job in NYC or to take class offerings that will prepare you for such a job, which is easily obtained from the top of the class at UNC. You want that sweet prestige or to have a better shot at academia or unicorn-type jobs, maybe all of the above. Anything else is window dressing you're using to deceive yourself or others about your motivations.


Thanks, man. I sincerely wanted to help and offer my perspective. Meant no ill will. I'm sorry if you felt offended or took it personally.

BlackAndOrange84
Posts: 101
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:06 am

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby BlackAndOrange84 » Fri Jul 08, 2016 9:43 pm

bookofblue wrote:
BlackAndOrange84 wrote:
bookofblue wrote:A few things:

(1) bankruptcy, secured transactions, banking law, nonprofit orgs, health/finance, and construction law are not your typical "corporate" subjects that are practiced in biglaw. Bankruptcy is very focused on commercial (i.e. individual Ch. 7 and 13) matters, not Ch. 11 corporate (though there may be a class taught by an adjunct). Secured transactions is heavily commercial based, though is important conceptually for larger corporate matters. The final three are regulatory or litigation focused. IBT you are right - overstated my point.
(2) Banking law is pretty specific. It is more corporate related, but not in the since of biglaw practices. Again, highly regulatory, not transactional.
(3) The banking journal, and Lisa Broome, are fantastic. Given Charlotte as a large merchant banking hub, the focus there could be highly beneficial if you like it. But it is NOT investment banking focused. Very much focused on depository institutions.
(4) The community dev. clinic is great, but nonprofit focused. If you want to do transactional biglaw, it is not the same, though might be helpful.


The context here is that UNC places really well in NC, which means its focused on more middle market subjects that most UNC grads go into. Word on the street is the new Dean is trying to change that and expand the curriculum to more M&A / biglaw-centric transactional stuff, so this could change.


Point (1) is false as to bankruptcy. About half the standard class is on Chapter 11, and the coverage is more than adequate. Spending time on individual bankruptcy is a natural and maybe essential way to be introduced to the bankruptcy concepts needed to dive into restructurings. Also, restructuring occurs in the shadow of Chapter 7 liquidation and is affected by how things would play out in liquidation (best interest of creditors test). Prof. Jacoby, a tenured professor, teaches a business bankruptcy seminar focusing on restructuring.

Generally, you're right that class offerings for "biglaw transactional work" (which you construe pretty narrowly) are a bit thin. But so what? With few exceptions, class selection doesn't matter. Classes don't prepare you for practice. You learn on the job. Nor is it often that classes get you or qualify you for a job. If you're able to transfer out of UNC for a school like Harvard, it's not because you want to lock down a "biglaw transactional" job in NYC or to take class offerings that will prepare you for such a job, which is easily obtained from the top of the class at UNC. You want that sweet prestige or to have a better shot at academia or unicorn-type jobs, maybe all of the above. Anything else is window dressing you're using to deceive yourself or others about your motivations.


Thanks, man. I sincerely wanted to help and offer my perspective. Meant no ill will. I'm sorry if you felt offended or took it personally.


Not personal or offended. Just not sure how pontificating about stuff that you have admittedly little knowledge of can be helpful to 0Ls. Your post was based on a too-narrow understanding of what biglaw transactional practice can encompass, ignorance of the relevance of certain areas of law for that practice, and the faulty premise that class selection is a strong value add for the student. Try first to do no harm.

josh9308
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:34 pm

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby josh9308 » Sat Jul 09, 2016 6:50 am

Curious if anyone would like to share the scholly money they receieved and their GPA/LSAT.


Thank you :)

Clarkston4554
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2016 5:04 pm

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby Clarkston4554 » Thu Aug 11, 2016 5:08 pm

Classes are up

User avatar
SeanORaff33
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 2:07 pm

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby SeanORaff33 » Wed Dec 07, 2016 2:27 pm

Hey y'all, I am aditted for next year, was wondering about good housing with dogs. If anyone knows of any close to campus, maybe even in Carborro, would you tell me where to check?

User avatar
SeanORaff33
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 2:07 pm

Re: UNC Law Class of 2019

Postby SeanORaff33 » Mon Dec 19, 2016 10:11 am

hey y'all, i know this is a pretty old forum, but did anyone have any luck negotiating for more scholly $ last year? what offers had traction?


Return to “TLS Class of 2019 Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest