Georgetown Law Class of 2018

(housing, friendships, future exams, all things 2018)

What section are you?

1 (Curriculum A)
11
23%
2 (Curriculum A)
9
19%
3 (Curriculum B)
5
11%
4 (Curriculum A)
13
28%
5 (Curriculum A)
8
17%
7 (PT Program)
1
2%
 
Total votes: 47

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wowchromosome
Posts: 25
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2015 4:14 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby wowchromosome » Tue Jan 06, 2015 4:17 pm

hey guys!!! got the letter right before Christmas... Didn't get a separate christmas card, though... Also, logged into status checker again today to see the red boxes everyone's talking about--submitted my certification request last week, but maybe slower because of the break?? Nervous... Also, it showed that there was a mailing 1/06/2015 with no description!!!! What does this mean????

sorry. i'm an overthinking lurker who's finally decided to join in on the fun.

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Gray
Posts: 5988
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:02 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Tue Jan 06, 2015 4:22 pm

wowchromosome wrote:hey guys!!! got the letter right before Christmas... Didn't get a separate christmas card, though... Also, logged into status checker again today to see the red boxes everyone's talking about--submitted my certification request last week, but maybe slower because of the break?? Nervous... Also, it showed that there was a mailing 1/06/2015 with no description!!!! What does this mean????

sorry. i'm an overthinking lurker who's finally decided to join in on the fun.

Did you get emails today about the Jan open house? That's what the mailing date for today was about, I think. And don't worry about the final transcript and the certification, they're due in May.

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navykev
Posts: 362
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 9:47 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby navykev » Tue Jan 06, 2015 5:13 pm

smccgrey wrote:
wowchromosome wrote:hey guys!!! got the letter right before Christmas... Didn't get a separate christmas card, though... Also, logged into status checker again today to see the red boxes everyone's talking about--submitted my certification request last week, but maybe slower because of the break?? Nervous... Also, it showed that there was a mailing 1/06/2015 with no description!!!! What does this mean????

sorry. i'm an overthinking lurker who's finally decided to join in on the fun.

Did you get emails today about the Jan open house? That's what the mailing date for today was about, I think. And don't worry about the final transcript and the certification, they're due in May.


Yep agreed - have the mailing date in status checker and got the email. That's probably it -- but fingers crossed that the mailing is a bumper sticker -- my jeep needs some Georgetown flare! :)

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Gray
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Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:02 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Thu Jan 08, 2015 12:17 pm

Is anyone thinking about applying to Global Law Scholars?

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Beanie14
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 2:19 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Beanie14 » Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:45 pm

smccgrey wrote:Is anyone thinking about applying to Global Law Scholars?


I'm thinking about it! I'm just worried that I won't qualify as "proficient" in my second language by their standards :( (also I just looked at their current class bios and I definitely don't have the background that seems necessary.)

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Gray
Posts: 5988
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:02 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Thu Jan 08, 2015 3:03 pm

Beanie14 wrote:
smccgrey wrote:Is anyone thinking about applying to Global Law Scholars?


I'm thinking about it! I'm just worried that I won't qualify as "proficient" in my second language by their standards :( (also I just looked at their current class bios and I definitely don't have the background that seems necessary.)

Ugh just read those bios. Probably can't compete.

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Capitol_Idea
Posts: 10692
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:54 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Capitol_Idea » Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:09 pm

Georgetown 3E here - congratulations and welcome in advance to all the incoming Hoyas!

There's been some really good advice on here, so I'll try not to repeat it, but wanted to share some of my experience in hopes it helps you do well. I was told these things before I started and it helped tremendously.

1. Do the reading. All of it. Brief cases like a Mofo. It is annoying, but the more you struggle early on, the easier reading and understanding the (extremely dry) material gets later on.

2. Go to class. All of them. The reading will get you the base material, but the professors (generally) distill for you A. what they think the takeaway is and B. what they'll want you to focus on for exam purposes. Take notes.

3. Put the laptop away. It is a distraction, and will sap away your attention. Take notes by hand on paper. It will force you to think about what the professor is saying and distill it into cleaner notes. When you're typing notes people tend to put the brain on standby and simply take dictation - there's no thought involved so you're not really absorbing it as well and you have way more notes to go through than if you use paper.

4. Make your own outline. The more you copy off of a commercial outline or someone else's previously made one, the higher chance you are going to include irrelevant or incorrect materials. Moreover, when you make your own outline, you have to wrestle with how all the materials fit together and you get an idea of how to approach potential exam questions.

5. Ultimately, it's all about repetition. The person who never attends class, does none of the reading, and preps with a commercial outline might do OK on the exam, but chances are they'll make enough mistakes or omissions to get bumped out of the A or A- range. If you do the reading, attend class and take notes, and then distill those notes into a final outline, all of that struggling pays off because you went through the material time after time until it's in your head.

6. You have time to do this all. I'm an evening student, but I audited an additional course my first year which essentially put me at a full student load. Plus I worked full-time. And held a research assistant job for a professor. And participated in Moot Court (both competing and helping manage the team logistics). And participated in journal, in which I got a note published. And two weeks before one round of finals, I became a dad. So yes, you have time to do all of the above.

7. Make friends. Law School is a grueling series of competitive ordeals - each round of finals is a soul-draining series of hoops, then comes the joy of on-campus interviews, followed by the actual summer associate work, then passing the Bar, etc. Having people to commiserate with helps immensely.

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navykev
Posts: 362
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 9:47 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby navykev » Sun Jan 11, 2015 7:12 pm

zacharus85 wrote:Georgetown 3E here - congratulations and welcome in advance to all the incoming Hoyas!


Thanks for the post Z - very helpful!

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LEPWU
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:19 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby LEPWU » Sun Jan 11, 2015 7:18 pm

zacharus85 wrote:Georgetown 3E here - congratulations and welcome in advance to all the incoming Hoyas!

There's been some really good advice on here, so I'll try not to repeat it, but wanted to share some of my experience in hopes it helps you do well. I was told these things before I started and it helped tremendously.

1. Do the reading. All of it. Brief cases like a Mofo. It is annoying, but the more you struggle early on, the easier reading and understanding the (extremely dry) material gets later on.

2. Go to class. All of them. The reading will get you the base material, but the professors (generally) distill for you A. what they think the takeaway is and B. what they'll want you to focus on for exam purposes. Take notes.

3. Put the laptop away. It is a distraction, and will sap away your attention. Take notes by hand on paper. It will force you to think about what the professor is saying and distill it into cleaner notes. When you're typing notes people tend to put the brain on standby and simply take dictation - there's no thought involved so you're not really absorbing it as well and you have way more notes to go through than if you use paper.

4. Make your own outline. The more you copy off of a commercial outline or someone else's previously made one, the higher chance you are going to include irrelevant or incorrect materials. Moreover, when you make your own outline, you have to wrestle with how all the materials fit together and you get an idea of how to approach potential exam questions.

5. Ultimately, it's all about repetition. The person who never attends class, does none of the reading, and preps with a commercial outline might do OK on the exam, but chances are they'll make enough mistakes or omissions to get bumped out of the A or A- range. If you do the reading, attend class and take notes, and then distill those notes into a final outline, all of that struggling pays off because you went through the material time after time until it's in your head.

6. You have time to do this all. I'm an evening student, but I audited an additional course my first year which essentially put me at a full student load. Plus I worked full-time. And held a research assistant job for a professor. And participated in Moot Court (both competing and helping manage the team logistics). And participated in journal, in which I got a note published. And two weeks before one round of finals, I became a dad. So yes, you have time to do all of the above.

7. Make friends. Law School is a grueling series of competitive ordeals - each round of finals is a soul-draining series of hoops, then comes the joy of on-campus interviews, followed by the actual summer associate work, then passing the Bar, etc. Having people to commiserate with helps immensely.


Thank you, thank you for taking the time to write down and send to us these bits of advice. I think I most appreciate hearing that it IS possible to do the work (classes, note-taking, readings, outlining, etc.) thoroughly, and that, in fact, such thoroughness will pay off in the end too. Good luck with your future, and thank you again!

User avatar
DiniMae
Posts: 734
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby DiniMae » Mon Jan 12, 2015 7:25 am

navykev wrote:
zacharus85 wrote:Georgetown 3E here - congratulations and welcome in advance to all the incoming Hoyas!


Thanks for the post Z - very helpful!

+1

User avatar
accessislife
Posts: 283
Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2014 10:40 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby accessislife » Mon Jan 12, 2015 5:43 pm

zacharus85 wrote:Georgetown 3E here - congratulations and welcome in advance to all the incoming Hoyas!

There's been some really good advice on here, so I'll try not to repeat it, but wanted to share some of my experience in hopes it helps you do well. I was told these things before I started and it helped tremendously.

1. Do the reading. All of it. Brief cases like a Mofo. It is annoying, but the more you struggle early on, the easier reading and understanding the (extremely dry) material gets later on.

2. Go to class. All of them. The reading will get you the base material, but the professors (generally) distill for you A. what they think the takeaway is and B. what they'll want you to focus on for exam purposes. Take notes.

3. Put the laptop away. It is a distraction, and will sap away your attention. Take notes by hand on paper. It will force you to think about what the professor is saying and distill it into cleaner notes. When you're typing notes people tend to put the brain on standby and simply take dictation - there's no thought involved so you're not really absorbing it as well and you have way more notes to go through than if you use paper.

4. Make your own outline. The more you copy off of a commercial outline or someone else's previously made one, the higher chance you are going to include irrelevant or incorrect materials. Moreover, when you make your own outline, you have to wrestle with how all the materials fit together and you get an idea of how to approach potential exam questions.

5. Ultimately, it's all about repetition. The person who never attends class, does none of the reading, and preps with a commercial outline might do OK on the exam, but chances are they'll make enough mistakes or omissions to get bumped out of the A or A- range. If you do the reading, attend class and take notes, and then distill those notes into a final outline, all of that struggling pays off because you went through the material time after time until it's in your head.

6. You have time to do this all. I'm an evening student, but I audited an additional course my first year which essentially put me at a full student load. Plus I worked full-time. And held a research assistant job for a professor. And participated in Moot Court (both competing and helping manage the team logistics). And participated in journal, in which I got a note published. And two weeks before one round of finals, I became a dad. So yes, you have time to do all of the above.

7. Make friends. Law School is a grueling series of competitive ordeals - each round of finals is a soul-draining series of hoops, then comes the joy of on-campus interviews, followed by the actual summer associate work, then passing the Bar, etc. Having people to commiserate with helps immensely.


this is dope. love all this advice. thank you!

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antiworldly
Posts: 375
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Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby antiworldly » Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:16 am

zacharus85 wrote:3. Put the laptop away. It is a distraction, and will sap away your attention. Take notes by hand on paper. It will force you to think about what the professor is saying and distill it into cleaner notes. When you're typing notes people tend to put the brain on standby and simply take dictation - there's no thought involved so you're not really absorbing it as well and you have way more notes to go through than if you use paper.


Speaking as a graduate TA, I can tell on the first day of class with pretty good accuracy where you will end up in the curve by this factor alone. When I TA'd gen. chem. (~1100 person class, 2 sections of 550), on the first day looking around about 1/3 of the class had laptops. Those that started with laptops developed the habit of using their laptops in class, and those who took notes by hand kept doing it. The ones with laptops seemed to absorbed/retained so much less because they invariably were unable to break into the top third of the class. Whether it was the physical act of writing your own notes that helped or the lack of "oh, I get this, let me play a game of minesweeper while the prof. finishes" the people who did best were the ones who hand wrote their class notes.

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Gray
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Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:24 am

Yeah +1, I'm definitely a fan of handwritten notes. Not only does it limit distractions, it also forces you to pay close enough attention to distill the essential information into manageable pieces.

You can easily transcribe an entire lecture on a computer and not retain any of it.

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xylocarp
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Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby xylocarp » Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:51 am

I hate hand writing notes. my handwriting becomes laughably bad to the point that I can't decipher it later, and I tend to write too hard and make my hand hurt (yeah, my life is hard - you should probably feel sorry for me). I've always taken laptop notes whenever possible, and it's always worked much much better for me, grades/retention-wise. I think it's because I'm quicker (allowing me to think about the concepts instead of just getting them down) and more able to organize as I go, which forces me to fit the concepts together logically, whereas when I hand write everything just goes in the notebook in the order it's said.

so, question for those in law school advocating the "no laptops" thing: do you think that this is unique to law school, or just a general life rule?

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tk17
Posts: 353
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:33 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby tk17 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:06 pm

xylocarp wrote:my handwriting becomes laughably bad to the point that I can't decipher it later


This is my problem.

I like the idea of handwriting notes, but I struggle to keep up, get frustrated, and then I look back later and have no idea what I wrote.


Edited to fix the cropping error in the quote that made Xylo look silly.

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ChemEng1642
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby ChemEng1642 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:23 pm

tk17 wrote:
xylocarp wrote:my handwriting becomes laughably bad to the point that I can't decipher it later


This is my problem.

I like the idea of handwriting notes, but I struggle to keep up, get frustrated, and then I look back later and have no idea what I wrote.


Edited to fix the cropping error in the quote that made Xylo look silly.


Still grinning at your tar :)

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Gray
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Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:25 pm

ChemEng1642 wrote:Still grinning at your tar :)

+1

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antiworldly
Posts: 375
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 8:18 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby antiworldly » Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:40 pm

So I have laughably bad handwriting if I'm trying to write fast. One of the many things that grad school has taught me is that if you are writing as fast as you can in class, you're both making a mess of your notes and writing too much. Profs can't convey as much information per minute as you can write. They can talk faster than you can write, but most of that isn't consequential. On advice of a senior grad student, I forced myself to slow down note taking to the point that it was legible. My notes got significantly better because it forced me to think then write, not write and then think about what in the world I had written later. Even when going through derivations on the board that have tons of math and all of it matters, slowing down and processing first made me a much better note taker.

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tk17
Posts: 353
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Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby tk17 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:50 pm

smccgrey wrote:
ChemEng1642 wrote:Still grinning at your tar :)

+1


:oops:

Aw shucks guys, thanks. :)

(gratuitous positing in an effort to get up to that 100 post milestone)

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ChemEng1642
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby ChemEng1642 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:19 pm

tk17 wrote:
smccgrey wrote:
ChemEng1642 wrote:Still grinning at your tar :)

+1


:oops:

Aw shucks guys, thanks. :)

(gratuitous positing in an effort to get up to that 100 post milestone)


+1

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JustHawkin
Posts: 1753
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 10:54 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby JustHawkin » Wed Jan 14, 2015 8:28 am

xylocarp wrote:I hate hand writing notes. my handwriting becomes laughably bad to the point that I can't decipher it later, and I tend to write too hard and make my hand hurt (yeah, my life is hard - you should probably feel sorry for me). I've always taken laptop notes whenever possible, and it's always worked much much better for me, grades/retention-wise. I think it's because I'm quicker (allowing me to think about the concepts instead of just getting them down) and more able to organize as I go, which forces me to fit the concepts together logically, whereas when I hand write everything just goes in the notebook in the order it's said.

so, question for those in law school advocating the "no laptops" thing: do you think that this is unique to law school, or just a general life rule?


Granted, I haven't gotten grades back, so I could get pwned. But, I'm in the laptop camp, if, and only if, you have self control. 1) you have to force yourself to remain engaged and not wander off into the depths of the internet. I turn my Internet off while in class. 2) you are not in court reporter school. Don't type verbatim what the professor says, but flesh out the important points of a case, theory, etc, that they want you to get out of it.

The reason I advocate for the laptop: organization and time. I really wouldn't know how to arrange stuff if I was just transcribing it. I like how I can create and edit an outline of class notes as I start to see a bigger picture. I also don't care to go back through my notes and take out what I want to put in my outline. At least for me, there wasn't any life altering class notes that it took the trauma of taking from the notebook to the laptop to learn. That's just my shtick, but you definitely need both those qualities in order for it too be done right.

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ChemEng1642
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby ChemEng1642 » Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:21 am

JustHawkin wrote:
xylocarp wrote:I hate hand writing notes. my handwriting becomes laughably bad to the point that I can't decipher it later, and I tend to write too hard and make my hand hurt (yeah, my life is hard - you should probably feel sorry for me). I've always taken laptop notes whenever possible, and it's always worked much much better for me, grades/retention-wise. I think it's because I'm quicker (allowing me to think about the concepts instead of just getting them down) and more able to organize as I go, which forces me to fit the concepts together logically, whereas when I hand write everything just goes in the notebook in the order it's said.

so, question for those in law school advocating the "no laptops" thing: do you think that this is unique to law school, or just a general life rule?


Granted, I haven't gotten grades back, so I could get pwned. But, I'm in the laptop camp, if, and only if, you have self control.


That is so critical - and something I am sorely lacking :(

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Gray
Posts: 5988
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:02 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby Gray » Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:27 am

ChemEng1642 wrote:That is so critical - and something I am sorely lacking :(

+1

I started writing a reply about how maybe I've changed since my lazy idiot days of undergrad, then realized I was TLSing at work.

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JustHawkin
Posts: 1753
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 10:54 am

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby JustHawkin » Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:35 am

smccgrey wrote:+1

I started writing a reply about how maybe I've changed since my lazy idiot days of undergrad, then realized I was TLSing at work.


The Self Control app is life.

Yes, there's an app for that...

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ChemEng1642
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Georgetown Law Class of 2018

Postby ChemEng1642 » Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:43 am

smccgrey wrote:
ChemEng1642 wrote:That is so critical - and something I am sorely lacking :(

+1

I started writing a reply about how maybe I've changed since my lazy idiot days of undergrad, then realized I was TLSing at work.


+1000

story of my life




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