Mike's Trainer Thread

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roranoa
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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby roranoa » Sat Sep 14, 2013 7:18 am

Hey Mike, thanks for all the help so far!

I have a question from pt59 RC (sec 3) passage 2.

How would you approach Q15? I did this passage about three times but I always get this question wrong. I always got boggled down by the specific wording they used inthe answer choices like, understanding purpose, how...formulated, familiarity, appreciation...etc. My thought process was like 'would law students "appreciate" the wordings? Did the author say that? I should look back....well not literally but I guess you could say the author implies it? Hmmm.... Not sure'......and so on.

It was hard also because I didn't retain much information so even though I knew where I had to refer back to, it took me some time looking up the two paragraphs that had the relevant information.

I understand why the right answer is right and why the wrong ones are wrong. I just want to know what I could do to prevent myself from getting questions like these wrong. (Although I'm not sure if this question can be categorized into a specific type)

Any advice?

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Sun Sep 15, 2013 7:25 am

neprep wrote:Hi Mike,

Hope I'm not jinxing my October test by saying this ( :shock: ) but it would be great if you could provide some scheduling tips for retakers as well. It might be good as a project for a rainy day, haha.


We must be on the save wavelength -- I'm sure you won't need it, but a longer article with suggestions for retakers is already in the works -- please pm me if you have any ideas/thoughts for it -- MK

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Sun Sep 15, 2013 8:06 am

roranoa wrote:Hey Mike, thanks for all the help so far!

I have a question from pt59 RC (sec 3) passage 2.

How would you approach Q15? I did this passage about three times but I always get this question wrong. I always got boggled down by the specific wording they used inthe answer choices like, understanding purpose, how...formulated, familiarity, appreciation...etc. My thought process was like 'would law students "appreciate" the wordings? Did the author say that? I should look back....well not literally but I guess you could say the author implies it? Hmmm.... Not sure'......and so on.

It was hard also because I didn't retain much information so even though I knew where I had to refer back to, it took me some time looking up the two paragraphs that had the relevant information.

I understand why the right answer is right and why the wrong ones are wrong. I just want to know what I could do to prevent myself from getting questions like these wrong. (Although I'm not sure if this question can be categorized into a specific type)

Any advice?


Whew -- that is a deceptively tough q -- I hadn't read that passage in a while --

In real time, first time through the answers, my thought process was --

a) strange - can't pick or eliminate
b) eliminate
c) seems like right answer - "knowledge...maritime...formulated" seems a bit of a stretch
d) eliminate
e) "appreciation...problems of wording...drafting antiterrorism laws" seems as much of a stretch as (C), now I'm not sure if (C) is right

I think of (C) and (E) as being similar, and go into the passage to see if there is some specific info to support those ideas -- that's when I get a stronger sense of the importance of all those words in the very first sentence sentence of the passage, and I can also support (C) and (E) with the general theme, and the details, of the third paragraph. I feel confident (C) and (E) do conform with what the author is proposing, and --

Looking back at (A) -- which threw me off at first because it does mention statutes, I can see that the main thrust of it is about locating relevant court decisions -- this is precisely the type of teaching that schools focus on currently, and this is precisely what the author is suggesting they go away from. So, I can pick (A).

Opening it up to some big picture thoughts about RC and this type of q --

What was necessary for me getting this q correct was

(A) a clear sense of the big-picture structure of the passage --

Currently, law schools focus on finding and discussing application of relevant laws -- the author feels that schools ought to focus more on the laws themselves -- the author has made this big picture theme very clear, and it's at the forefront of my mind as I think about all q's -- this q is a great example of how big-picture understanding is essential even for problems that seem to require a great deal of specificity.

(B) a clear sense of the question task --

This q stem is worded in a convoluted fashion, and it would be very easy to rush through it and not totally get what it's asking for -- from the question stem, you should expect, going into the answer choices, that four of them will be related to students having increased understanding (etc.) of statutes themselves, along with the benefits of students having this understanding. Even though this is a tough q and the answers don't play out exactly as I expect, having the right expectations still makes my task easier, and it helps me to see that this is, indeed, a tougher q (b/c it doesn't conform as easily to what I expect).

(C) the goal of actually eliminating wrong answers --

Most people search for the right answer, and push wrong answers aside -- this can get you to a certain score, but --

As I've said many times, I think a huge key for many students who break into those top top scores is a focus on eliminating wrong choices --

If I were to go into the answers looking for the right one, there is a very good chance I would have picked (C), or, picked either (C) or (E) after debating those two --

It's the act of trying to prove answers wrong (in this case, by trying to confirm that (C) and (E) do indeed match up with the author's specific views and comments) that makes it so that I don't overlook (A) (which I might if I were just l looking for a right choice) and don't fall for (C) or (E) --

In my opinion, the great majority of the hardest RC q's, especially for top scorers, are ones that, either because of the question task or the specific answers, don't have a "slam-dunk" right answer -- think about the test writer's burden (he/she has to make one answer right and four wrong) and in these cases it's often a huge help to be able to see that wrong answers are definitely wrong.

(D) the ability to confirm the right choice

-- commonly, this has to do with a correct understanding of the passage purpose, and instincts about passage structure (which go hand in hand) -- for both (C) and (E), you need to be able to quickly reference relevant parts of the passage, and obviously you need a strong sense of structure in order to do that -- checking (A) against the text, I can see that it clearly matches the opposite of what the author is hoping for. I can see that (A) must be right.

Not sure exactly where things went astray for you -- know that this is a tough question for everyone, and I hope the above comments give you some ideas about how to make questions like this a bit easier to get right --

It's actually the middle of the night for me -- I woke up and couldn't fall back asleep and somehow found myself answering this q! I'm a bit delirious, so sorry if any of that was confusing, and please reach out if you need anything else --

Mike

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby roranoa » Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:16 am

Thanks for the great response Mike! You never disappoint!

I have another RC question I was hoping you vould help me with.

This is a q from pt60 sec 4 q19 .

It's one of those detail q's that has answer choices that seems to have been drawn from all over the passage. When I read an answer choice for detail q's like this I'm not sure if I don't recognize a particular answer choice bc the passage didn't actually mention it or bc I didn't retain that information. Then I spend (waste) time re-reading a part of the passage that I assume would have this information.

So on this one, when I read through the answer choices I couldn't confirm or disprove any of the choices initially. So I panicked and frantically went back and forth the passage and the answer choices for some time before decided I give up and move on.

What would be the appropriate move to make when this happens? Right after I read through the choices and don't know whether any of them are right or wrong, what should my action plan be?

With this q again I understand why the right answer is right and that all the wrong answers are not supported in the passage.

How should I approach this one? Because the q asked for general info on Teatro Campesino, it didn't occur to me that I should focus on the first paragraph. Should I have taken a hint from the q stem specifically stating the name "Teatro Campesino" which is mentioned only in the first paragraph and the last?

This was a long question. I hope you could help. It seems like I struggle most and waste time most on these detail questions. Especially with passages that is focused on illustrating a subject rather than comparing viewpoints.

Thanks.

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby Macalpinerules » Mon Sep 16, 2013 5:52 am

Hey Mike, thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions. I took a look at your site and everything you've posted looks really legit. I enjoyed reading some of your lessons; they were well written, informative, and done in an unintimidating way. I'm definitely gonna pick up the LSAT trainer in October. I have several well known LSAT manuals, but I like the way you broke things down in your lessons, so i'm gonna take a look at your manual as insurance before my December LSAT.

As far as a question:what do you believe are the must-know flaws? I know it's not possible to know every flaw the LSAT could potentially test you on, but what flaws, because of their frequency and classic status, do you believe an LSAT student should recognize at the drop of a dime?

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby Hotguy » Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:13 pm

Macalpinerules wrote:Hey Mike, thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions. I took a look at your site and everything you've posted looks really legit. I enjoyed reading some of your lessons; they were well written, informative, and done in an unintimidating way. I'm definitely gonna pick up the LSAT trainer in October. I have several well known LSAT manuals, but I like the way you broke things down in your lessons, so i'm gonna take a look at your manual as insurance before my December LSAT.

As far as a question:what do you believe are the must-know flaws? I know it's not possible to know every flaw the LSAT could potentially test you on, but what flaws, because of their frequency and classic status, do you believe an LSAT student should recognize at the drop of a dime?

According to the lsat trainer, all flaws fall under three main categories: a piece is not a puzzle, apples aren't oranges, and 1+1 is not 3. I'm sure I could explain all those three categories to you, but since you will pick up the book, I won't take it away from your learning experience(a good one).

Btw, Mike your book is great!!

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:54 pm

roranoa wrote:Thanks for the great response Mike! You never disappoint!

I have another RC question I was hoping you vould help me with.

This is a q from pt60 sec 4 q19 .

It's one of those detail q's that has answer choices that seems to have been drawn from all over the passage. When I read an answer choice for detail q's like this I'm not sure if I don't recognize a particular answer choice bc the passage didn't actually mention it or bc I didn't retain that information. Then I spend (waste) time re-reading a part of the passage that I assume would have this information.

So on this one, when I read through the answer choices I couldn't confirm or disprove any of the choices initially. So I panicked and frantically went back and forth the passage and the answer choices for some time before decided I give up and move on.

What would be the appropriate move to make when this happens? Right after I read through the choices and don't know whether any of them are right or wrong, what should my action plan be?

With this q again I understand why the right answer is right and that all the wrong answers are not supported in the passage.

How should I approach this one? Because the q asked for general info on Teatro Campesino, it didn't occur to me that I should focus on the first paragraph. Should I have taken a hint from the q stem specifically stating the name "Teatro Campesino" which is mentioned only in the first paragraph and the last?

This was a long question. I hope you could help. It seems like I struggle most and waste time most on these detail questions. Especially with passages that is focused on illustrating a subject rather than comparing viewpoints.

Thanks.


Another hard RC question! Can't you ask me something easy about Arcade Fire (not a fan of the new song and a bit worried about the upcoming album) or Logic Games?

In my book, I talk about different types of detail q's that hinge on you returning to the text to find relevant proof -- this is one of those classic time-suckers that give you very little clue as to where to find the right answer/what to look for in the right answer -- these questions will naturally take a bit longer, but you shouldn't expect more than a couple per section --

As always, a strong understanding of reasoning structure will make you better and faster at identifying relevant info --

The stem asks about an answer that is "most supported" -- I know that means I'm going to need to find an answer that is consistent with the text and can be justified based on the text, but is not specifically mentioned.

I have no idea where to look for the answer, and my mindset is to eliminate, eliminate, eliminate --

(A) -- "eventually won the acceptance of a few farm owners" -- I don't remember anything to support this -- a quick check of the text confirms this and I can get rid of it.

(B) -- I remember that troupe being mentioned - leave it. (In retrospect, I could also see myself being very suspicious of this answer and going back into the text to confirm that it's wrong, as I did with (A), but in real time I left this.)

(C) -- I remember reading about international recognition in the first paragraph, and there is specific mention of various dates -- prime candidate for making some sort of inference -- leave it.

(D) -- partially in English? Don't remember reading anything remotely related to this -- quick check confirms. Eliminate.

(E) -- praise from critics in u.s. and in Mexico -- I don't remember this, but I know it was praised, so maybe there is something that allows for this inference.

So, after the first round, I've got (B), (C), and (E) -- not ideal, but it is what it is -- I'm still in elimination mode, and two answers I don't like are (B) and (E) -- it's fairly easy to ID "SF Mime Troupe" and eliminate (B), and it's also fairly easy to scan through and see no discussion of US vs international or Mexican critics and eliminate (E) -- notice again my mindset is to confirm elimination -- that leaves me with just (C), and that point I can go into the first paragraph, and notice why the passage is written specifically with "by 1965" and "1965 marks birth" and know, per seeing something that "designed" for an inference, that I've gotten the correct answer --

So, no shortcut for you -- sorry! -- as always, I think it's really important to understand the structure of the passage correctly, fully utilize the q stem, and focus on eliminating wrong before confirming right -- HTH -- and even though I hate answering RC q's, really happy to see you digging so deep with it -- let me know if you need anything else -- Mike

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby Dr. Dre » Mon Sep 16, 2013 5:22 pm

My favorite arcade fire song is the suburbs

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Mon Sep 16, 2013 5:28 pm

Dr. Dre wrote:My favorite arcade fire song is the suburbs


For days I have been waiting for this response!

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:05 pm

Macalpinerules wrote:Hey Mike, thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions. I took a look at your site and everything you've posted looks really legit. I enjoyed reading some of your lessons; they were well written, informative, and done in an unintimidating way. I'm definitely gonna pick up the LSAT trainer in October. I have several well known LSAT manuals, but I like the way you broke things down in your lessons, so i'm gonna take a look at your manual as insurance before my December LSAT.

As far as a question:what do you believe are the must-know flaws? I know it's not possible to know every flaw the LSAT could potentially test you on, but what flaws, because of their frequency and classic status, do you believe an LSAT student should recognize at the drop of a dime?


Hi There --

Thanks so much for the nice comments --

As you'll see in the book, I encourage more an intuitive and situation-specific understanding of flaws -- This is due, in part, to personal preference, but far more importantly, it's due to what I saw from top scorers (other than for those people who teach the LSAT for certain companies, I saw very little evidence of people thinking about flaws in the technical and formal ways that many of these very companies recommend), and also experienced with many of the other students that I worked with -- so, I'm not the best person to go to for the answer to your q, I think -- I will say that, in prepping for the trainer, I broke down countless LR problems, and organized all of the issues that I saw in them as simply and clearly as I could, and lessons 6-8 (the ones mr. hotguy references) will expose you to all of the major issues that you are likely to see on test day -- though maybe not necessarily in terms of the strict categories that you might expect --

Sorry, I know that's not a great answer and not the answer you were hoping for! But I hope it's a bit helpful, and I hope you enjoy the trainer -- Mike

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:13 pm

Hi everyone --

3 quick announcements --

First the bad news --

1) After four months of struggle, I've cut it off with my ebook-guy and am going to be starting fresh -- I will be doing the epub conversion myself, and releasing the ebook in portions (Intro / LR / RC / then LG last -- the LG diagrams are an epub nightmare) I apologize to those of you who have been waiting for the kindle version -- the wait is going to be just a bit longer. In any case, I do think, because it is a workbook, that in general the paper version is the way to go.

Now the good --

2) The LSAT Trainer website will be going through some major changes by middle or end of this week -- as part of this change, 8 chapters from the book will now be available for free -- please check it out when you get a chance.

3) Starting about three hours ago, a freshened up version of the trainer is now available on Amazon -- thanks again to all those who helped find those final typos.

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby roranoa » Mon Sep 16, 2013 10:58 pm

Thanks for your help on pt60 sec 4 q19 .

I just have one small follow up question. When you said you did a quick check or scan to eliminate choices A and D did you literally just browse/skim through the passage with eyes to look fir keywords like English or Spanish or farmers? Or did you actually quickly read certain portions of the passage you thought were relevant?

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby neprep » Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:55 am

Hi Mike, quick question for you about Strengthen-EXCEPT questions.

On these questions, we should eliminate answer choices that strengthen the argument. The one that is left is credit. My question is, is the criteria we use to determine a good strengthener looser in these questions? That is, is it the case that an incorrect answer choice on a strengthen-EXCEPT question might not make a good candidate for the correct choice on a "most strengthens" question?

Take for discussion's sake PT61, Section 2, # 22. On a "most strengthens" question, I would hesitate to choose (C) because it seems irrelevant: Maybe the anxiety and depression patters of 40-60 year olds are not the same as first-year students. But here, (C) is an incorrect response, which means that the powers that be feel it does strengthen the argument. But I don't think LSAC would make (C) credited in a "most strengthens" scenario, because it doesn't really strengthen the argument that much, except to say "btw, this thesis has been established for older people."

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby orioles21 » Tue Sep 17, 2013 2:23 pm

Hey Mike,

Is it safe to order the LSAT Trainer now on Amazon.com and ensure that I get the updated version?
The site looks the same and it doesn't seem like there were any changes made (publication date is still May 10 and edition is still 1)

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Tue Sep 17, 2013 2:32 pm

orioles21 wrote:Hey Mike,

Is it safe to order the LSAT Trainer now on Amazon.com and ensure that I get the updated version?
The site looks the same and it doesn't seem like there were any changes made (publication date is still May 10 and edition is still 1)


Hi -- Yes, if you order the trainer now on Amazon you will get the updated version (I recommend you actually order from Amazon, rather than a 3rd party seller, just to be sure -- the third party sellers might have an extra of an older version lying around) -- hope you enjoy and reach out if you need anything -- Mike

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Tue Sep 17, 2013 2:44 pm

neprep wrote:Hi Mike, quick question for you about Strengthen-EXCEPT questions.

On these questions, we should eliminate answer choices that strengthen the argument. The one that is left is credit. My question is, is the criteria we use to determine a good strengthener looser in these questions? That is, is it the case that an incorrect answer choice on a strengthen-EXCEPT question might not make a good candidate for the correct choice on a "most strengthens" question?

Take for discussion's sake PT61, Section 2, # 22. On a "most strengthens" question, I would hesitate to choose (C) because it seems irrelevant: Maybe the anxiety and depression patters of 40-60 year olds are not the same as first-year students. But here, (C) is an incorrect response, which means that the powers that be feel it does strengthen the argument. But I don't think LSAC would make (C) credited in a "most strengthens" scenario, because it doesn't really strengthen the argument that much, except to say "btw, this thesis has been established for older people."


I don't think their criteria for what strengthens is necessarily different -- I do think that for these strengthen EXCEPT q's, the gap between support and conclusion, in general, tends to be wider (makes sense when you consider it from the test writer's perspective--for a suff assumption q for example, u need an argument where one answer, like a magic bullet, will fix everything - those q's require arguments with smaller gaps -- a strengthen EXCEPT will include four different ways to strengthen, so, one of the ways to make these q's work is to widen the gap).

But, far more importantly, I think you have a wrong answer key my friend -- even if (C) were relevant (and the author has gone out of his way to show that these are most likely distinctly different groups of people so relevancy is a stretch), it would weaken the author's argument (because it strengthens, rather than weakens, the bond between spending $ and less anxiety/depression) -- your instincts were correct, and (C) is the right answer --

Mike

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Tue Sep 17, 2013 2:49 pm

roranoa wrote:Thanks for your help on pt60 sec 4 q19 .

I just have one small follow up question. When you said you did a quick check or scan to eliminate choices A and D did you literally just browse/skim through the passage with eyes to look fir keywords like English or Spanish or farmers? Or did you actually quickly read certain portions of the passage you thought were relevant?



That's right -- I literally just skim -- probably about 2 seconds or less in real time for the first, maybe just a bit longer for D (though in certain instances I can definitely imagine myself slowing down) -- some big keys for why I could do this were a) I really didn't remember reading about those things at all, and so wasn't expecting those ideas to be there and b) probably more importantly, I didn't see those things as being relevant to to the author's points/themes and so I didn't see a reason why they would be there. HTH.

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby roranoa » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:00 pm

The LSAT Trainer wrote:
roranoa wrote:Thanks for your help on pt60 sec 4 q19 .

I just have one small follow up question. When you said you did a quick check or scan to eliminate choices A and D did you literally just browse/skim through the passage with eyes to look fir keywords like English or Spanish or farmers? Or did you actually quickly read certain portions of the passage you thought were relevant?



That's right -- I literally just skim -- probably about 2 seconds or less in real time for the first, maybe just a bit longer for D (though in certain instances I can definitely imagine myself slowing down) -- some big keys for why I could do this were a) I really didn't remember reading about those things at all, and so wasn't expecting those ideas to be there and b) probably more importantly, I didn't see those things as being relevant to to the author's points/themes and so I didn't see a reason why they would be there. HTH.


Wait, is that to say that the actual answer was relevant to the author's points/themes? In what way would you say that it was relevant? Is it b/c the author is generally speaking of the history of actos and so whether the Troupe had international recognition is relevant too?

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby neprep » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:15 pm

The LSAT Trainer wrote:
neprep wrote:Hi Mike, quick question for you about Strengthen-EXCEPT questions.

On these questions, we should eliminate answer choices that strengthen the argument. The one that is left is credit. My question is, is the criteria we use to determine a good strengthener looser in these questions? That is, is it the case that an incorrect answer choice on a strengthen-EXCEPT question might not make a good candidate for the correct choice on a "most strengthens" question?

Take for discussion's sake PT61, Section 2, # 22. On a "most strengthens" question, I would hesitate to choose (C) because it seems irrelevant: Maybe the anxiety and depression patters of 40-60 year olds are not the same as first-year students. But here, (C) is an incorrect response, which means that the powers that be feel it does strengthen the argument. But I don't think LSAC would make (C) credited in a "most strengthens" scenario, because it doesn't really strengthen the argument that much, except to say "btw, this thesis has been established for older people."


I don't think their criteria for what strengthens is necessarily different -- I do think that for these strengthen EXCEPT q's, the gap between support and conclusion, in general, tends to be wider (makes sense when you consider it from the test writer's perspective--for a suff assumption q for example, u need an argument where one answer, like a magic bullet, will fix everything - those q's require arguments with smaller gaps -- a strengthen EXCEPT will include four different ways to strengthen, so, one of the ways to make these q's work is to widen the gap).

But, far more importantly, I think you have a wrong answer key my friend -- even if (C) were relevant (and the author has gone out of his way to show that these are most likely distinctly different groups of people so relevancy is a stretch), it would weaken the author's argument (because it strengthens, rather than weakens, the bond between spending $ and less anxiety/depression) -- your instincts were correct, and (C) is the right answer --

Mike


Thanks! So eseenentially our criteria are the same, it's just the S-EXCEPT questions lend themselves to several plausible strengtheners

And no, not the wrong answer key, just severely compromised reading ability after the PT. Now things make more sense :)

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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:20 pm

roranoa wrote:
The LSAT Trainer wrote:
roranoa wrote:Thanks for your help on pt60 sec 4 q19 .

I just have one small follow up question. When you said you did a quick check or scan to eliminate choices A and D did you literally just browse/skim through the passage with eyes to look fir keywords like English or Spanish or farmers? Or did you actually quickly read certain portions of the passage you thought were relevant?



That's right -- I literally just skim -- probably about 2 seconds or less in real time for the first, maybe just a bit longer for D (though in certain instances I can definitely imagine myself slowing down) -- some big keys for why I could do this were a) I really didn't remember reading about those things at all, and so wasn't expecting those ideas to be there and b) probably more importantly, I didn't see those things as being relevant to to the author's points/themes and so I didn't see a reason why they would be there. HTH.


Wait, is that to say that the actual answer was relevant to the author's points/themes? In what way would you say that it was relevant? Is it b/c the author is generally speaking of the history of actos and so whether the Troupe had international recognition is relevant too?


Sorry -- I wrote that wrong, I think -- let me be a bit clearer --

By relevant -- I meant to the reasoning structure, rather than just main points -- this doesn't necessarily have to do with just the one or two key ideas, but rather how the passage is designed around those points --

To me, (C) relates the Teatro to United Farm Workers -- in terms of reasoning structure --

In real time, when I read the passage after you asked the question -- I was thrown off by the juxtaposition of the first part of the first paragraph -- Chavez UFWU etc -- and the second part -- Valdez and Teatro -- it took until I was deeper into the passage before I realized it was pretty much all about Valdez/Teatro --

So, when I read (C), I do have an instinctual sense that it is somehow related to the reasoning structure of the passage.

Additionally, I don't mean to make it seem like the inference to be made must be consistent with the themes of the passage -- and often, for the hardest questions, the inference to be made is something that is not directly relevant to the main themes -- (For example, a passage might be about how most people like Arcade Fire, but, in one line, there will be subtle clues that members of a certain group of people don't like the stage effects that Arcade Fire uses, and even though those clues aren't relevant to the author's main points, they could be what is used for an inference).

What I simply meant was that, in terms of thinking about "is this a subject that could have been mentioned but I missed it somehow?" a big part of what shapes my instincts is the reasoning structure that is built around the main points -- if I can see it playing some part in this structure, I feel there is a better chance that it might be in there and I missed it; if I can't see it being relevant to this reasoning structure (as in the case of "farm owners" -- where, I really don't know what that would relate to), I'm far more likely to expect that something won't be there.

Again, sorry I wasn't clear, or even correct -- hope this clarifies things a bit more -- Mike

roranoa
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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby roranoa » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:40 am

Thanks for the clarification on my follow up question.

I guess you did it on a somewhat instinctive level when you made that judgement about whether which answer choice was relevant to the reasoning structure or not.

I'll work on that.


Thanks.

fumagalli
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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby fumagalli » Wed Sep 18, 2013 2:35 am

Why did you decide to make your website name "thelsattrainer" instead of just "lsattrainer"? Why didn't you lose the "the". Like Zuckerberg did.

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The LSAT Trainer
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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:03 pm

fumagalli wrote:Why did you decide to make your website name "thelsattrainer" instead of just "lsattrainer"? Why didn't you lose the "the". Like Zuckerberg did.


I actually wanted, and would have preferred, just "lsattrainer," but one of those website squatter companies (leeches) owns the name, and I would have had to pay them a lot of $ to get it.

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PourMeTea
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Postby PourMeTea » Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:26 am

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Frozinite
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Re: Mike, author of the LSAT Trainer, answering questions

Postby Frozinite » Sat Sep 21, 2013 12:16 pm

The LSAT Trainer wrote:3) Starting about three hours ago, a freshened up version of the trainer is now available on Amazon -- thanks again to all those who helped find those final typos.



Noo! I ordered mine last week and got the old version - definitely lots of typos :lol: . I bought it due to amazing reviews from others from the October thread and I just finished it two days ago. Probably the best prep book that I've read - helped a lot with the thought process and super quick identifying 80+% of the correct/incorrect answers. I'm already seeing an improvement, but not as much as I had hoped (average 169/170 -> 173/174), but I only just started working with the new techniques.

I really love that you spend so much time describing why answers are right/wrong for every single question. Manhattan does this too, but only for a couple questions here and there. This is very useful!

Only gripe - line numbers in passages! It really doesn't bother except for the 3-4 questions where you need it, then its actually a little annoying and throws off the groove.

Either way, great resource - Keep up the good work!


P.S. The book was shipped at the same zip code as where I live and I got it same day - are you located in the LA area?


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