Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

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af0890
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby af0890 » Mon Feb 02, 2015 3:31 pm

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Last edited by af0890 on Mon Jun 08, 2015 5:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Thu Feb 05, 2015 10:12 pm

af0890 wrote:Hi,

I know people have asked this before but not on this thread, so I was hoping to get your advice. I'm retaking the LSAT Saturday after taking it in September. I've been airtight on LG and LR for months, but what tripped me up on the September test was the RC. I do very well on old RC sections (before PT 67-ish) but recent ones seem significantly harder to me. Even after retaking I can't get above -3, where I'm at -2 to -0 on older tests. I'm having the most trouble with the most recent comparative passages, especially asking you to characterize the passages and not just their similarities and differences (e.g. PT 73 RC question 27). Also having trouble with the questions asking you to add to the last sentence (e.g. PT 73 RC question 21). These are answers that, to me, are not found easily in the passages themselves, so I don't have time to really look for them. Do you have any tips on these broader inference questions? I'm always getting down to two responses and agonizing over them.

Hey!

I'm going to be totally upfront with you and say that I'm super intimidated by this RC section. In my opinion, it's one of the hardest sections of all time, and you pointed out two of the trickiest questions to boot. If you were in the -3 range on this section, honestly, you're doing really well.

With that said, I'll give you a few general things to think about when you're answering broad inference questions like these ones. Let's start with question 21. This question is tough mostly because the passage has a very complex structure, and it's hard to see exactly where the author stands. But whenever you're answering a question like this, you should essentially be looking for the primary purpose. The hypothetical "last sentence" should sum up the central argument, which in the case of this passage, is subtle and easy to miss. So, start with an analysis of the passage in broad strokes: In the beginning it appears to be just about Marcuse's argument about advertising creating false needs, but then starting in paragraph 3, the author weighs in -- but NOT on the merits of advertising, just on the merits of Marcuse's critique. The author isn't saying Marcuse is wrong about advertising, exactly, but just that Marcuse's critique contains an internal contradiction. That's what makes the primary purpose a little tough to place. So the author leaves open the possibility that Marcuse is correct in saying that advertising is detrimental to society, but because of a certain flaw (i.e., if Marcuse is right about false needs, then we have no idea what our real needs are), Marcuse's critique fails to adequately explain why that's the case. That's what answer choice A says, and that's why it's the correct answer. B and C fail to account for the author's critique of Marcuse's critique (I know, I know), and D and E misconstrue the message. For D, the author doesn't say the social benefits of advertising outweigh the detriments, and for E, the "except" clause misrepresents the Marcusean contradiction which the author identifies.

Property justice comparative, Q27: This one is, again, a question that requires you to consider the passages in very broad strokes. With this type of question, I'd recommend focusing mostly on your elimination process. Because the ACs are phrased abstractly, the correct answer won't necessarily jump out at you, but you will be able to find something concrete in the passages that will definitively eliminate each of the incorrect ACs. When I solved this question for the first time (and I'm quite sure I got it wrong, if it's of any consolation), I was hesitant to choose A because I wasn't sure if passage B "necessarily" endorses the argument it lays out. Of course "necessarily" is a logically loaded word, which is why that clause doesn't invalidate the answer choice. Also, look at line 48--this is just "one" way of thinking about the issue. The author of passage B doesn't necessarily endorse it. But the rest can be definitively eliminated: B is wrong because Passage A never mentions any competing views of property. C is wrong because Passage A makes no policy recommendations. D is wrong because Passage A doesn’t "briefly" state a view. Passage A’s view is the entire passage. And passage A actually doesn’t provide an argument to justify that view. E is wrong because Passage B doesn’t attempt to undermine any views. It just lays out one possible view.

Sorry for the long winded response, but I hope this will help you formulate a general strategy for attacking these types of questions. To recap: For the 'add a final sentence' questions, treat them like primary purpose questions. Look for the answer choice that states the central argument as accurately and broadly as possible. For the abstract 'characterize the approach' questions, rely on your process of elimination. There will be language in every wrong answer choice that very clearly doesn't fit the passage(s). In fact, you should treat these almost like method of reasoning questions in LR. Look at the passage as one long stimulus, and consider the argumentative structure.

Best of luck on Saturday! Let me know if you have any other questions.

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Sat Feb 07, 2015 12:46 am

For the Febbers:

Best of luck tomorrow! I know you'll kill it. To those of you who might be feeling the nerves tonight, just remind yourselves that it's all temporary, and that you'll get through it. I remember feeling like the test was this enormous wall, and I couldn't imagine what life would be like on the other side of it. Well, for me it was pretty much the same, just with a lot more beer.

So keep your eye on the prize, stay aggressive, but be sure to keep it all in perspective. It's just another Saturday where you get out of bed and take an LSAT--just like basically every other Saturday in the last few months. You can do this. You've done it countless times before. Tomorrow is just another PT. No different from any of the others you've seen. Trust in your preparation, and settle into that sweet state of flow which you all know so well.

This is it, guys. Go claim what you've already earned.

See you on the other side!

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Sat Feb 07, 2015 6:05 pm

CONGRATS! The February LSAT has been conquered -- or, at the very least, survived. You did it!

Feel free to post your thoughts about the test on the Blueprint "Instant Recap" thread on the LSAT blog.

Here's the link.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Mon Feb 09, 2015 4:54 pm

Febbers, colleagues, countrymen, silence your fears.

The waiting period--the period we've all been waiting for--is finally here. 'Tis the season for hand wringing, restless pacing, stress baking, head scratching, and ceaseless pangs of doubt: "Did I misread a rule?" "Did I forget to turn the page after the 23rd LR?" "Did I bubble Bs when I meant to bubble Cs?" "Did I miss the test altogether, and my entire muddled memory of D Day was actually just a lucid stress dream?"

Shh. There there. It's all going to be okay.

The best way to deal with the waiting period, in my experience, is to simply not wait. You know when to start refreshing your emails. It isn't any time soon. (I'm putting my money on Feb 27.) So unless you're considering cancelling--which I almost never recommend, since your high score is your only score--you have nothing to gain from analyzing your stress-induced hallucinations and blurred recollections of test day. You have no decisions to make about retakes or applications or anything of the sort until you have your actual scores in hand. So go do something else. Live large. Run! Skip! Jump for joy! Celebrate your newfound freedom by doing all of the things you couldn't do when you were holed up in your prep dungeon suffocated by rational thinking, studies about bacteria, and dancing honeybees.

If you need emotional support in this truly trying time, feel free to come post in this thread. And I will tell you to go do some yoga, have a beer (probably not at the same time), and stop worrying about the LSAT. It's all out of your hands now. To paraphrase Roosevelt, there are four fundamental freedoms that Febbers all over the world ought to enjoy:

Freedom of speech, freedom from want, freedom from fear, and freedom from LSAT.

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Smallville
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Smallville » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:11 pm

BP Ben wrote: "Did I forget to turn the page after the 23rd LR?"

if they thought the 23rd problem in LR was the last one then they may have a bigger problem than just waiting... also
BP Ben wrote: (I'm putting my money on Feb 27.)

How much money?
BP Ben wrote:If you need emotional support in this truly trying time, feel free to come post in this thread.

You trying to replace the waiter's thread....?
Image

eta: jk nice post Mr. Ben

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Tue Feb 10, 2015 5:11 pm

Smallville wrote:if they thought the 23rd problem in LR was the last one then they may have a bigger problem than just waiting...

Honestly--and I'm a little ashamed to say it--this happened to me once on a PT. Finished Q23 at around 31:00, figured that was a good place to stop, and totally neglected to turn the page. It was the last section, so I didn't even find out until I reviewed the test.

also
BP Ben wrote: (I'm putting my money on Feb 27.)

How much money?

$10. You in?

You trying to replace the waiter's thread....?

No, no. You guys seem to be doing a great job of blowing off steam over there already. Plus, I have exactly 0 interest in knowing how much space 1/4 of a cow takes up in my freezer.

(I kind of regret posting in there, tbh.)

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Shakawkaw
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Shakawkaw » Tue Feb 10, 2015 5:14 pm

BP Ben wrote:(I kind of regret posting in there, tbh.)


J'accuse!!!

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Thu Feb 12, 2015 12:49 pm

LSAT words of wisdom: Slow down to speed up

Don't underestimate the positive impact of untimed drilling. I think nearly everyone agrees that going slowly is useful in the beginning, but I believe it's important to continue doing untimed drills throughout your prep period. Whether your skill level is in the 140s or the 170s, you will always stand to benefit from eliminating the time pressure and allowing yourself to sink into the complexities of a difficult question without being compelled to cut corners. Untimed practice allows you to do that, and it will improve your timing significantly in the long run.

It's true that you can't go -0 quickly until you can go -0 slowly. But beyond that, I think you're doing yourself a disservice to focus on timing at all until you've mastered the fundamentals completely. And that's mostly because timing on the LSAT isn't a function of speed. It's a function of efficiency. Strengthening your pattern recognition and your ability to immediately locate the relevant parts of a stimulus, make deductions in a game, and visualize the reasoning structure of a passage will enable you to move through the section at lightning speed, without ever feeling like you're rushing. It may seem counter-intuitive, but in my experience, eliminating time pressure helps students become more efficient in their process by allowing them to find their way to the crucial bits of a stim/setup/passage, and really internalize the patterns they encounter. The outcome: If you spend a ton of time on an unfamiliar or challenging question, the next time you see something like it, you'll remember the pattern and be able to solve it almost immediately.

Timing pressure just mucks up that whole process. Your focus shifts to the peripheral things like reading speed, rushing quickly through your diagrams and hypos, looking for the right answers and skimming over the rest. Those are shortcuts, not strategies. That sort of thing might help you finish a section under time, but it won't measurably improve your scoring capacity.

The takeaway: Timing is a matter of efficiency, rather than speed. So if you want to improve your timing, do lots of untimed drilling, and focus entirely on perfecting your process and internalizing patterns.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:02 pm

LSAT words of wisdom: Leisure time

I'm a huge fan of rest days. In fact, when I was studying for the LSAT, I used a technique that I like to call "threshold training." Stay tuned for a post devoted entirely to this technique, but basically it's about scheduling strategic (and long) rests into your prep period so that they kick in right when you need them. For me, it was 3 weeks of steadily increasing intensity--approaching burnout in week 3--and then a whole week of doing nothing LSAT related. After pushing myself beyond my limitations of focus and stamina, that recovery week always left me in amazing shape when I started studying again. I learned that recovery time is a critical component of any effective prep schedule. That's the week when you make your major breakthroughs.

But here's a question that people often neglect to consider: What should I be doing with my off days?

The obvious answer is that you should be doing something relaxing. But there's a important caveat: You should make a point to avoid demotivating sources of leisure. What I mean is that you need to stay away from things that might become habit forming, and might seep into your prep time when you start studying intensely again. Biggest demotivating leisure activity, IMO: streaming internet TV. The last thing you want to do is start watching Netflix all night during your rest period, and then have the urge to finish your shows when the prep period starts up again. All of that inertia will be tough to overcome, and it might have a lasting impact on your level of motivation.

So try to stay productive, even on your off days. Fill your LSAT time with pleasure reading, playing music, exercising--anything that won't render you couchridden and sedentary. Trust me, you'll be in a much better position to ramp up the intensity if you're not recovering from a Netflix hangover.

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Wed Feb 18, 2015 2:01 pm

LSAT words of wisdom: "How much time should I be studying per week?"

This is a question I get asked all the time. Let me just come out and say it: Prepping for the LSAT is not a situation in which the phrase "less is more" applies. More is more. You should be studying as much as you can handle (unless you're on a scheduled recovery period). So, if you find yourself with a good deal of downtime, your schedule is probably way too light.

I was working full time while I was studying for the LSAT, but at the height of my prep, I scheduled 2-4 hours per day during the week (drills and review), and 5-8 hours per day on the weekends (PTs). On a typical day, I got up at 6:00 to go for a run and do a couple of timed sections before work, and then I spent at least 1-2 hours drilling and another hour reviewing after work.

On the weekends, I took PTs. You should plan to spend 5-8 hours on each PT you take. 3 hours and 10 minutes for a 5 section test (always add at least one experimental section, and tack on a few more if you're working on your endurance), and then another 3-5 hours combing through the entire test untimed without checking your answers, breaking down all of the arguments/setups/passages, and deciding whether you want to change any of your answers. This is process is called "blind review" (I believe credit is due to 7Sage for the name). Everyone should do this, every time they take a PT. It's horribly painstaking and tedious, but it's the best thing you can do for your prep.

So, adding it all up: When you're at the height of your prep, you should be looking at about 10-20 hours of prep during the week, and another 10-16 hours of PTing and reviewing on the weekends. If that seems like a lot, that's because it is. But if you keep a schedule like that, you're bound to make serious progress.

clee920
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby clee920 » Wed Feb 18, 2015 7:51 pm

Question 7 on PT 6 (october 1992); Section 2 - High- Technology medicine....

I'm really confused. I am using the Cambridge packets and this question is included in the Must Be True packet. The answer key indicates C but on the Manhattan forum of explanations, it's shown as a Causation question and indicates the answer is E. Can someone help me with this?

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:21 pm

clee920 wrote:Question 7 on PT 6 (october 1992); Section 2 - High- Technology medicine....

I'm really confused. I am using the Cambridge packets and this question is included in the Must Be True packet. The answer key indicates C but on the Manhattan forum of explanations, it's shown as a Causation question and indicates the answer is E. Can someone help me with this?

Hey clee!

I just consulted my copy of the Cambridge MBT packet and the answer sheet to PT6, and it looks like the Cambridge answer sheet is wrong. The correct answer to PT6 Sec2 Q7 is E. I think the problem was that the MBT packet mistakenly credited the high tech medicine question as Q6, but it was actually Q7 in the PT. The answer to Q6 (not at MBT question) is C. So therein lies the confusion.

The Manhattan explanation is right; the Cambridge answer key is wrong.

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Deleterious
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Deleterious » Fri Feb 20, 2015 6:11 am

Hi there. When does BP roll out their yearly curriculum refresh? I'm considering taking BP The Movie, but I want to get the latest materials. Thanks in advance.

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North
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby North » Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:07 pm

Hey Blueprint people. If you guys are interested in offering a prize for this year's rankings prediction contest, shoot me a PM. Here's this year's thread: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=243939. This is the third year I've put it on, and I'd like to continue the tradition of expanding the available prizes. In return for putting up prizes, you’ll get some pretty good exposure for your company in what is a perennially popular thread on TLS (last year’s thread had more than 25,150 page views – that’s more than almost any thread in the Professional’s forum) and also the goodwill of TLSers (I’ve been on this site for about 5 years, and people here love it when the people they ask for advice do this kind of stuff).

PM me if you're interested or have any questions.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:37 pm

Deleterious wrote:Hi there. When does BP roll out their yearly curriculum refresh? I'm considering taking BP The Movie, but I want to get the latest materials. Thanks in advance.

Hey Deleterious,

We update our course every December. The update for December 2014 was to the practice exams to make sure that the six spaced throughout the course are the most recent available. We now use the following exams:

Dec 2012 (PT68)
Jun 2013 (PT 69)
Oct 2013 (PT70)
Dec 2013 (PT 71)
Jun 2014 (PT72)
Sept 2014 (PT 73)

These are the exams that are included in the online course calendar so that students can get a baseline score (exam 1), then track their progress and how well they’re internalizing concepts throughout the course (exams 2-4), then work on timing (exams 5,6).

There are also fifteen additional PTs available online for students to take should they need/want more practice. We’ll also make the December 2014 (PT 74) exam available as soon as we receive it and format it from LSAC.

Let me know if you need any more info!

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Tue Feb 24, 2015 12:13 pm

LSAT Words of Wisdom: "What if I run out of materials?!"

Dear future LSAT masters, this is a Public Service Announcement:

There is no such thing as running out of materials.

Seriously. It's not possible. Even if you've solved every question from every released test in the history of the LSAT, you have not run out of materials. Instead, you've given yourself a gift: The gift of being able to solve every question from every released test in the history of the LSAT twice, three times, ten times if you have to. The questions don't lose their value after you've solved them once. In fact, the more times you do a drill/section/PT, the more value it holds in the development of your skill set.

Too many people make the mistaken assumption that they should be preserving the sanctity/innocence of their PTs by keeping them "fresh." Honestly, this doesn't matter at all. The more times you solve a question, the better you are at solving that type of question. Period. Even if your PT scores end up being inflated a little bit, it's not going to hurt you as long as you keep your head down and continue doing the work. The fact is that it's so much better to have done a drill/section/PT multiple times than it is to have done it only once.

So stop worrying about "saving" your materials (for marriage? Who knows). Retaking PTs is really freaking good for you. I promise. Why, you ask? Because getting better at this test is all about pattern recognition. The more times you solve these questions correctly, the better equipped you will be to find the right answers on test day. If you've done every question in the history of the LSAT multiple times over, there is no way that you will be thrown off by anything "novel" on test day. Novelty on the LSAT doesn't exist. It's an illusion caused by under-preparation. Every question you see on your LSAT will have tens, perhaps hundreds, of structurally equivalent predecessors on previous tests. It's basically the same exercise every. single. time.

So, don't save materials. Save yourself--from the illusion of "novelty." Retake, retake, retake. Internalize patterns. Score 180. Profit.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Dr. Nefario » Tue Feb 24, 2015 1:39 pm

This was asked in the waiters thread but I was curious from an instructors point of view, what is your favorite LG that has been on a test?

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:00 pm

RaiderRed wrote:This was asked in the waiters thread but I was curious from an instructors point of view, what is your favorite LG that has been on a test?

Hey Raider! Good question. So hard to choose.

I'm a huge formal logic nerd, so I always loved in/out games more than life itself. Obviously the clichés classics of mauve dinos and CDs are at the top of my list.

But my fav game of all time is PT 34 G4 with the doctors in two clinics, since the conditional rules combine to form a contradiction, and you had to permanently negate the sufficient to make sure the chain was never triggered. (Something like, if L is in, then P had to be both in and out, so L always has to be out.) I'm pretty sure that's the only game where that sort of thing has happened. A stunning specimen of LOLSAT trickery.

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Post removed.

Postby schmelling » Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:35 pm

Post removed.
Last edited by schmelling on Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:41 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Shakawkaw
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Shakawkaw » Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:42 pm

BP Ben wrote:
RaiderRed wrote:This was asked in the waiters thread but I was curious from an instructors point of view, what is your favorite LG that has been on a test?

Hey Raider! Good question. So hard to choose.

I'm a huge formal logic nerd, so I always loved in/out games more than life itself. Obviously the clichés classics of mauve dinos and CDs are at the top of my list.

But my fav game of all time is PT 34 G4 with the doctors in two clinics, since the conditional rules combine to form a contradiction, and you had to permanently negate the sufficient to make sure the chain was never triggered. (Something like, if L is in, then P had to be both in and out, so L always has to be out.) I'm pretty sure that's the only game where that sort of thing has happened. A stunning specimen of LOLSAT trickery.


It was my question. Thanks for the credit, Raider. :roll:

Also, in/out games are my favorite, too! I experience great joy when I link contrapositives and conditionals.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:47 pm

schmelling wrote:Ben, with all this time spent on the LSAT, how do you have time to stay in such great shape?

:lol: Good question, schmelling. I will say, it hasn't been easy. But it's common knowledge in the prep community that you can't score in the 99th percentile on the LSAT unless you have well-defined, 99th percentile abs and pecs. As a successful tutor yourself, I'm sure you know this to be true.

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby Blueprint Ben » Thu Feb 26, 2015 5:56 pm

LSAT Words of Wisdom: Preparing for the worst

I took the LSAT twice. I studied for over a year for my first take. I was pretty confident, going in, that I had done everything I could have possibly done to prepare for this monstrosity. I read all the prep books, drilled like a raving lunatic, took 22 PTs timed with a fifth (and for the last month, sixth) section added. For the weeks leading up to the test, I woke up at the same time every day, ate healthy foods, exercised daily, tapered off to avoid burnout, and got myself into optimal test taking condition. And somehow (why, gods, why?!) I scored a full 5 points lower than my practice average on test day.

How does this happen? So many people deal with this same kind of disappointment. It's frustrating, debilitating, and it makes us want to just give up and settle for a lower score.

I can't speak for everyone, but I can say for sure why it happened to me. The mistake I made the first time through was that I, without even realizing it, had been preparing for the best possible outcome. I tried to control every aspect of my life so that I was in the perfect frame of mind every time I took a practice test. And my skill level was such that even at my best, I was only averaging right at my retake threshold (171). At the time, I honestly thought that would be enough. To just be averaging the score I wanted, and plan to perform at my best on test day. HUGE mistake.

Reality check: More than likely, you will not be functioning at your best on test day. You just won't. If you've ever been nervous for anything in your life, you will be nervous for the LSAT. It's a big deal. It's as important as it is challenging, and it's literally impossible to over-prepare. Even if you're averaging 179, you'll likely have some doubts about your ability to perform.

So don't plan on being at your best. Plan on being at your worst. Prepare with the goal in mind that even if you have a crippling nervous breakdown, you'll be able to score at or above your target.

When I was gearing up for my retake, I tested this theory out. The second time around, I made an effort to study at the least opportune times and in the worst possible conditions. I took PTs on little to no sleep. I took PTs back to back, fighting extreme fatigue through the last few sections. I took PTs in loud diners and in coffee shops with little kids screaming and kicking the legs of my chair. When I was feeling "under the weather," I didn't take the day off. I pushed even harder, since I wanted to be able to do this in sickness as well as in health.

By the time I sat for my retake, I was ready for anything. And just as I expected, the morning of test day was a nightmare. The car service I arranged forgot to show up. I got soaked in the rain trying to hail a cab. I rushed to the test center and sat down, only to find that I wasn't allowed to relieve the pee I had been holding for the last half hour. But I prepared for the worst, so none of it phased me in the slightest. It was just a regular PT. That day, I bested my first take by over 10 points.

Moral of the story: Prepare for the worst, because that's probably what you'll face on test day.

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leslieknope
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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby leslieknope » Thu Feb 26, 2015 6:00 pm

BP Ben, you'll tell us when you guys know when scores are coming out, right?

Love, TeamFeb

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Re: Blueprint LSAT Prep's ongoing ask-an-instructor extravaganza

Postby nlee10 » Thu Feb 26, 2015 6:01 pm

leslieknope wrote:BP Ben, you'll tell us when you guys know when scores are coming out, right?

Love, TeamFeb


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