2019 July California Bar

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jc9812

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby jc9812 » Mon Aug 05, 2019 1:26 pm

jrpreston wrote:
belmont123 wrote:
perfunctory wrote:so if i put "to: partner" instead of "cecila lenox, esq." they would take points off? but if you say they took points off for uploading late...can't argue with that. damn, surprising and upsetting for an exam where you need every point. going to lose my shit if this is what fails me.



Well, I'm not sure who Cecilia Lenox is, I thought the PT was for Andrew Something.....?


Yes. If I recall the associates name was Andrew Solomark.

Can anyone please confirm this? The name of the associate we were writing to? Was it a male or female...as others have indicated here...

Thank you


I think you all are talking about two separate PTs, the MPT v the CPT.

Bingo_Bongo

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Bingo_Bongo » Mon Aug 05, 2019 1:45 pm

jrpreston wrote: I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start.


Source? It's my understanding that the individual states are in charge of grading the MPTs, so wouldn't each state administering the MPT come up with the appropriate rubrics/deductions for mistakes?

Honestly, I doubt you'd receive anything more than a 10 point deduction off your total scaled score. Why? Because that's the deduction you receive if you fail to upload your essays on time (arguably a way bigger mistake than putting your name on your test). The bar also feels the need to announce the sanction for this mistake on their website, which leads me to believe if they felt a mistake was worth more than that, they'd also put that sanction up there as well.

9xSound wrote:A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


Oh, come on.

jennimarcy

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby jennimarcy » Mon Aug 05, 2019 1:49 pm

For those who took the recent bar exam, how did the actual questions compare to Adaptibar questions?

Caruthers

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Caruthers » Mon Aug 05, 2019 2:48 pm

jc9812 wrote:I did the same thing this person did:

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=302300

And accidentally wrote my name on the CPT.

I did not even think about and I do not recall them saying not to during the instructions, but it seems like an obviously bad idea given that it's blind graded. Can anyone point me to somewhere in the rules that addresses this, or does anyone know if my score will be thrown out? I will be in touch with the bar but I cannot seem to find anything in the rules online.


Shouldn't worry. I know of several cases like this in the past and I think they just redact/cross out. Although we are told (it was part of the announcements) not to identify ourselves, they don't sanction for this

Animal_Activist

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Animal_Activist » Mon Aug 05, 2019 3:12 pm

jennimarcy wrote:For those who took the recent bar exam, how did the actual questions compare to Adaptibar questions?


Honestly, many of the questions Adaptibar gives are similar to the MBE. This does not mean that you will be ready for every question they throw at you by doing Adaptibar. They have some experimental questions and even graded ones that stand out and seem different than Adaptibar or any other bar prep course questions. Overall, Adaptibar felt like it came closest to preparing me for the MBE questions.

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Atmosphere

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Atmosphere » Mon Aug 05, 2019 8:50 pm

As a reference point - I wrote my name on the July 18 PT, my scores were 70/65 (which I thought was fair).

So no, I don’t think they harshly penalize. When I got my essays back after failing, my name was just redacted.

justanotheruser

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby justanotheruser » Tue Aug 06, 2019 2:23 am

jennimarcy wrote:For those who took the recent bar exam, how did the actual questions compare to Adaptibar questions?


Multi-time repeater here who passed the February 2018 exam. MBEs were always my strength and I prepped using only Emanuel S&T + Adaptibar. My adaptibar average (~1800 questions) was 85-86%. The MBEs on the actual exam felt way harder. On Adaptibar, in a 30-question set, I'd be 50-50 on maybe 2-3 of them. On the real thing, it felt like I was 50-50 on at least half the questions.

Bingo_Bongo

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Bingo_Bongo » Wed Aug 07, 2019 1:27 am

Every exam period everybody says the same thing. The MBEs are harder than BARBRI, adapitbar, the NCBE questions, ect. Everyone was saying it after I took the bar several years ago; they were saying it last February; and they're saying it now.

What it is, is you're stressed out more during the actual bar, and you're second guessing yourself more. You're also not getting instantaneous feedback telling you how well you're doing, or feedback at the very end telling you what percentage you got right, ect.

In reality, the questions probably weren't much different that you were using to study with, and you probably got near your most recent simulated exam scores

9xSound

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby 9xSound » Wed Aug 07, 2019 2:13 am

rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
jrpreston wrote:
perfunctory wrote:Would they take points off? It would be not following the exam's instructions, not the instructions of the PT.


I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start. I know it's harsh, and I'm really sorry, but it's the fact of the matter.... Do you by any chance remember the name of the associate you were writing to?


Thank goodness the CBX isn't the UBE because failing someone for a simple error that really doesn't have anything to do with their ability to practice law or write a memo is fantastically ridiculous. As the California Bar has recently shown .......everyone is subject to making bonehead "inadvertent mistakes."

I'd take it with a grain of salt that it's an auto fail for inadvertently writing your name on the memo. I'll Google it later but I'm positive that there are people who have made this mistake and ended up passing.

And it's kinda crazy to say something is the "fact of the matter" if someone has no idea if something applies to the OPs situation at all.


A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


That's an absolutely ridiculous and stupid thing to say. Seriously, how long have you been practicing law and you've never ever made a stupid or careless error? Never? Really? You are perfect all the time and ever even slightly careless in a stressful situation? Because what you say sounds like some nonsensical stupid bullshit some know it all first year law school student would say.

Good attorneys, even excellent attorneys make mistakes all the time, careless or otherwise. Many of them could and would tell you about them.

An unsuspecting public would be terrorized by someone who mistakenly put their name on a PT during the bar exam? GTFOH with that noise. I didn't put my name on my PTs but I would happily say that whoever thinks that THAT is a sign of a bad future attorney can go right ahead and fuck themselves in their own asshole.


LOL! Temper, temper! Do attorneys always talk like that?

Uh, yes. This is the California Bar Exam we're talking about here, right? Hardest in the country, yes? Used to be. It certainly isn't a high school spelling test. It's a competition. The best win. The rest fail. You know that. I've got all the empathy in the world for takers, especially repeaters, but sorry, the Bar Exam just isn't the place to make stupid mistakes. Get real, dude. If I were grading a PT and saw that some candidate had put his or her real name on the test, I'd be rather unforgiving. Better write one hell of a PT to get past it.

9xSound

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby 9xSound » Wed Aug 07, 2019 2:27 am

Bingo_Bongo wrote:
jrpreston wrote: I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start.


Source? It's my understanding that the individual states are in charge of grading the MPTs, so wouldn't each state administering the MPT come up with the appropriate rubrics/deductions for mistakes?

Honestly, I doubt you'd receive anything more than a 10 point deduction off your total scaled score. Why? Because that's the deduction you receive if you fail to upload your essays on time (arguably a way bigger mistake than putting your name on your test). The bar also feels the need to announce the sanction for this mistake on their website, which leads me to believe if they felt a mistake was worth more than that, they'd also put that sanction up there as well.

9xSound wrote:A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


Oh, come on.


I know my remark seems overly severe — and it probably is. But in the real world of litigation, it's a merciless, bloody dogfight. Your opponents will seize and take advantage of you every chance they get. They'll burn you to the ground at all costs. Don't go into this profession hoping to find nice people who will give you a pass. They don't.

cavalier1138

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby cavalier1138 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 7:41 am

9xSound wrote:
Bingo_Bongo wrote:
jrpreston wrote: I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start.


Source? It's my understanding that the individual states are in charge of grading the MPTs, so wouldn't each state administering the MPT come up with the appropriate rubrics/deductions for mistakes?

Honestly, I doubt you'd receive anything more than a 10 point deduction off your total scaled score. Why? Because that's the deduction you receive if you fail to upload your essays on time (arguably a way bigger mistake than putting your name on your test). The bar also feels the need to announce the sanction for this mistake on their website, which leads me to believe if they felt a mistake was worth more than that, they'd also put that sanction up there as well.

9xSound wrote:A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


Oh, come on.


I know my remark seems overly severe — and it probably is. But in the real world of litigation, it's a merciless, bloody dogfight. Your opponents will seize and take advantage of you every chance they get. They'll burn you to the ground at all costs. Don't go into this profession hoping to find nice people who will give you a pass. They don't.


So how's therapy been? Making good progress?

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 10:07 am

9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
jrpreston wrote:
perfunctory wrote:Would they take points off? It would be not following the exam's instructions, not the instructions of the PT.


I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start. I know it's harsh, and I'm really sorry, but it's the fact of the matter.... Do you by any chance remember the name of the associate you were writing to?


Thank goodness the CBX isn't the UBE because failing someone for a simple error that really doesn't have anything to do with their ability to practice law or write a memo is fantastically ridiculous. As the California Bar has recently shown .......everyone is subject to making bonehead "inadvertent mistakes."

I'd take it with a grain of salt that it's an auto fail for inadvertently writing your name on the memo. I'll Google it later but I'm positive that there are people who have made this mistake and ended up passing.

And it's kinda crazy to say something is the "fact of the matter" if someone has no idea if something applies to the OPs situation at all.


A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


That's an absolutely ridiculous and stupid thing to say. Seriously, how long have you been practicing law and you've never ever made a stupid or careless error? Never? Really? You are perfect all the time and ever even slightly careless in a stressful situation? Because what you say sounds like some nonsensical stupid bullshit some know it all first year law school student would say.

Good attorneys, even excellent attorneys make mistakes all the time, careless or otherwise. Many of them could and would tell you about them.

An unsuspecting public would be terrorized by someone who mistakenly put their name on a PT during the bar exam? GTFOH with that noise. I didn't put my name on my PTs but I would happily say that whoever thinks that THAT is a sign of a bad future attorney can go right ahead and fuck themselves in their own asshole.


LOL! Temper, temper! Do attorneys always talk like that?

Uh, yes. This is the California Bar Exam we're talking about here, right? Hardest in the country, yes? Used to be. It certainly isn't a high school spelling test. It's a competition. The best win. The rest fail. You know that. I've got all the empathy in the world for takers, especially repeaters, but sorry, the Bar Exam just isn't the place to make stupid mistakes. Get real, dude. If I were grading a PT and saw that some candidate had put his or her real name on the test, I'd be rather unforgiving. Better write one hell of a PT to get past it.


Yes, we all talk exactly alike. That's exactly how it works.

If you think "the best" is someone who remembers not to write their name on a PT, you....are a moron. And you will end up walking into traffic if Darwin has anything to say about it.

Placing this much importance on not making what amounts to a clerical error shows that you're probably not best situated to practice law, because your mind can't think beyond format and the type of clerical errors people hire secretarial staff to catch. You'd make a good secretary, and there isn't an exam for that....you should do that. But you're unlikable so try to work for someone who doesn't need you to answer a phone....or talk to clients.

Thank goodness no one is letting you grade anything. As for "getting real" another poster just outlined getting a 75 on a PT in spite writing their name, so apparently the only one being unrealistic is you. Just LOL that a test isn't hard enough because people don't auto fail for writing their name on a PT......GTFOH with that nonsense.

You needn't be concerned about the CBX "slipping" by passing people who write their name on a PT. You need to be much more concerned about the fact that you are the sort of person people barely tolerate, and only when forced to.

But then again maybe you should worry about the CBX if you're under the impression that not writing your name demonstrates some degree of legal skill and acumen.

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 10:16 am

9xSound wrote:
Bingo_Bongo wrote:
jrpreston wrote: I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start.


Source? It's my understanding that the individual states are in charge of grading the MPTs, so wouldn't each state administering the MPT come up with the appropriate rubrics/deductions for mistakes?

Honestly, I doubt you'd receive anything more than a 10 point deduction off your total scaled score. Why? Because that's the deduction you receive if you fail to upload your essays on time (arguably a way bigger mistake than putting your name on your test). The bar also feels the need to announce the sanction for this mistake on their website, which leads me to believe if they felt a mistake was worth more than that, they'd also put that sanction up there as well.

9xSound wrote:A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


Oh, come on.


I know my remark seems overly severe — and it probably is. But in the real world of litigation, it's a merciless, bloody dogfight. Your opponents will seize and take advantage of you every chance they get. They'll burn you to the ground at all costs. Don't go into this profession hoping to find nice people who will give you a pass. They don't.


Yes future attorneys, please know that in the real world opposing counsel will definitely start a war over you writing your name in the wrong place. That is EXACTLY how the profession works. LOL.

Law & Order: Clerical Error Unit

9xSound

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby 9xSound » Wed Aug 07, 2019 11:49 am

rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
jrpreston wrote:
perfunctory wrote:Would they take points off? It would be not following the exam's instructions, not the instructions of the PT.


I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start. I know it's harsh, and I'm really sorry, but it's the fact of the matter.... Do you by any chance remember the name of the associate you were writing to?


Thank goodness the CBX isn't the UBE because failing someone for a simple error that really doesn't have anything to do with their ability to practice law or write a memo is fantastically ridiculous. As the California Bar has recently shown .......everyone is subject to making bonehead "inadvertent mistakes."

I'd take it with a grain of salt that it's an auto fail for inadvertently writing your name on the memo. I'll Google it later but I'm positive that there are people who have made this mistake and ended up passing.

And it's kinda crazy to say something is the "fact of the matter" if someone has no idea if something applies to the OPs situation at all.


A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


That's an absolutely ridiculous and stupid thing to say. Seriously, how long have you been practicing law and you've never ever made a stupid or careless error? Never? Really? You are perfect all the time and ever even slightly careless in a stressful situation? Because what you say sounds like some nonsensical stupid bullshit some know it all first year law school student would say.

Good attorneys, even excellent attorneys make mistakes all the time, careless or otherwise. Many of them could and would tell you about them.

An unsuspecting public would be terrorized by someone who mistakenly put their name on a PT during the bar exam? GTFOH with that noise. I didn't put my name on my PTs but I would happily say that whoever thinks that THAT is a sign of a bad future attorney can go right ahead and fuck themselves in their own asshole.


LOL! Temper, temper! Do attorneys always talk like that?

Uh, yes. This is the California Bar Exam we're talking about here, right? Hardest in the country, yes? Used to be. It certainly isn't a high school spelling test. It's a competition. The best win. The rest fail. You know that. I've got all the empathy in the world for takers, especially repeaters, but sorry, the Bar Exam just isn't the place to make stupid mistakes. Get real, dude. If I were grading a PT and saw that some candidate had put his or her real name on the test, I'd be rather unforgiving. Better write one hell of a PT to get past it.


Yes, we all talk exactly alike. That's exactly how it works.

If you think "the best" is someone who remembers not to write their name on a PT, you....are a moron. And you will end up walking into traffic if Darwin has anything to say about it.

Placing this much importance on not making what amounts to a clerical error shows that you're probably not best situated to practice law, because your mind can't think beyond format and the type of clerical errors people hire secretarial staff to catch. You'd make a good secretary, and there isn't an exam for that....you should do that. But you're unlikable so try to work for someone who doesn't need you to answer a phone....or talk to clients.

Thank goodness no one is letting you grade anything. As for "getting real" another poster just outlined getting a 75 on a PT in spite writing their name, so apparently the only one being unrealistic is you. Just LOL that a test isn't hard enough because people don't auto fail for writing their name on a PT......GTFOH with that nonsense.

You needn't be concerned about the CBX "slipping" by passing people who write their name on a PT. You need to be much more concerned about the fact that you are the sort of person people barely tolerate, and only when forced to.

But then again maybe you should worry about the CBX if you're under the impression that not writing your name demonstrates some degree of legal skill and acumen.


Dude, with your attitude, I just don't know about this profession. And you think I should read your post and engage you intellectually? Lol. Students, some lawyers, like this guy, think it's fine to call those with whom they have a disagreement "morons." And they'll do it openly and unashamedly. Take note.

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 12:50 pm

9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
jrpreston wrote:
I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start. I know it's harsh, and I'm really sorry, but it's the fact of the matter.... Do you by any c onhance remember the name of the associate you were writing to?


Thank goodness the CBX isn't the UBE because failing someone for a simple error that really doesn't have anything to do with their ability to practice law or write a memo is fantastically ridiculous. As the California Bar h recently shown .......everyone is subject to making bonehead "inadvertent mistakes."

I'd take it with a grain of salt that it's an auto fail for inadvertently writing your name on the memo. I'll Google it later but I'm positive that there are people who have made this mistake and ended up passing.

And it's kinda crazy to say something is the "fact of the matter" if someone has no idea if something applies to the OPs situation at all.


A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


That's an absolutely ridiculous and stupid thing to say. Seriously, how long have you been practicing law and you've never ever made a stupid or careless error? Never? Really? You are perfect all the time and ever even slightly careless in a stressful situation? Because what you say sounds like some nonsensical stupid bullshit some know it all first year law school student would say.

Good attorneys, even excellent attorneys make mistakes all the time, careless or otherwise. Many of them could and would tell you about them.

An unsuspecting public would be terrorized by someone who mistakenly put their name on a PT during the bar exam? GTFOH with that noise. I didn't put my name on my PTs but I would happily say that whoever thinks that THAT is a sign of a bad future attorney can go right ahead and fuck themselves in their own asshole.


LOL! Temper, temper! Do attorneys always talk like that?

Uh, yes. This is the California Bar Exam we're talking about here, right? Hardest in the country, yes? Used to be. It certainly isn't a high school spelling test. It's a competition. The best win. The rest fail. You know that. I've got all the empathy in the world for takers, especially repeaters, but sorry, the Bar Exam just isn't the place to make stupid mistakes. Get real, dude. If I were grading a PT and saw that some candidate had put his or her real name on the test, I'd be rather unforgiving. Better write one hell of a PT to get past it.


Yes, we all talk exactly alike. That's exactly how it works.

If you think "the best" is someone who remembers not to write their name on a PT, you....are a moron. And you will end up walking into traffic if Darwin has anything to say about it.

Placing this much importance on not making what amounts to a clerical error shows that you're probably not best situated to practice law, because your mind can't think beyond format and the type of clerical errors people hire secretarial staff to catch. You'd make a good secretary, and there isn't an exam for that....you should do that. But you're unlikable so try to work for someone who doesn't need you to answer a phone....or talk to clients.

Thank goodness no one is letting you grade anything. As for "getting real" another poster just outlined getting a 75 on a PT in spite writing their name, so apparently the only one being unrealistic is you. Just LOL that a test isn't hard enough because people don't auto fail for writing their name on a PT......GTFOH with that nonsense.

You needn't be concerned about the CBX "slipping" by passing people who write their name on a PT. You need to be much more concerned about the fact that you are the sort of person people barely tolerate, and only when forced to.

But then again maybe you should worry about the CBX if you're under the impression that not writing your name demonstrates some degree of legal skill and acumen.


Dude, with your attitude, I just don't know about this profession. And you think I should read your post and engage you intellectually? Lol. Students, some lawyers, like this guy, think it's fine to call those with whom they have a disagreement "morons." And they'll do it openly and unashamedly. Take note.


Trust me when I tell you that this is what everyone is saying about you behind your back on a regular basis. You don't even have an intellectual point to engage on because what you're saying makes no sense.

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 12:50 pm

9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:
rcharter1978 wrote:
jrpreston wrote:
I can all but guarantee they will take off points. And judging by the way they grade, it won't be a little amount. I know that for the UBE's MPT they will start you off at 50% from the start. I know it's harsh, and I'm really sorry, but it's the fact of the matter.... Do you by any c onhance remember the name of the associate you were writing to?


Thank goodness the CBX isn't the UBE because failing someone for a simple error that really doesn't have anything to do with their ability to practice law or write a memo is fantastically ridiculous. As the California Bar h recently shown .......everyone is subject to making bonehead "inadvertent mistakes."

I'd take it with a grain of salt that it's an auto fail for inadvertently writing your name on the memo. I'll Google it later but I'm positive that there are people who have made this mistake and ended up passing.

And it's kinda crazy to say something is the "fact of the matter" if someone has no idea if something applies to the OPs situation at all.


A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


That's an absolutely ridiculous and stupid thing to say. Seriously, how long have you been practicing law and you've never ever made a stupid or careless error? Never? Really? You are perfect all the time and ever even slightly careless in a stressful situation? Because what you say sounds like some nonsensical stupid bullshit some know it all first year law school student would say.

Good attorneys, even excellent attorneys make mistakes all the time, careless or otherwise. Many of them could and would tell you about them.

An unsuspecting public would be terrorized by someone who mistakenly put their name on a PT during the bar exam? GTFOH with that noise. I didn't put my name on my PTs but I would happily say that whoever thinks that THAT is a sign of a bad future attorney can go right ahead and fuck themselves in their own asshole.


LOL! Temper, temper! Do attorneys always talk like that?

Uh, yes. This is the California Bar Exam we're talking about here, right? Hardest in the country, yes? Used to be. It certainly isn't a high school spelling test. It's a competition. The best win. The rest fail. You know that. I've got all the empathy in the world for takers, especially repeaters, but sorry, the Bar Exam just isn't the place to make stupid mistakes. Get real, dude. If I were grading a PT and saw that some candidate had put his or her real name on the test, I'd be rather unforgiving. Better write one hell of a PT to get past it.


Yes, we all talk exactly alike. That's exactly how it works.

If you think "the best" is someone who remembers not to write their name on a PT, you....are a moron. And you will end up walking into traffic if Darwin has anything to say about it.

Placing this much importance on not making what amounts to a clerical error shows that you're probably not best situated to practice law, because your mind can't think beyond format and the type of clerical errors people hire secretarial staff to catch. You'd make a good secretary, and there isn't an exam for that....you should do that. But you're unlikable so try to work for someone who doesn't need you to answer a phone....or talk to clients.

Thank goodness no one is letting you grade anything. As for "getting real" another poster just outlined getting a 75 on a PT in spite writing their name, so apparently the only one being unrealistic is you. Just LOL that a test isn't hard enough because people don't auto fail for writing their name on a PT......GTFOH with that nonsense.

You needn't be concerned about the CBX "slipping" by passing people who write their name on a PT. You need to be much more concerned about the fact that you are the sort of person people barely tolerate, and only when forced to.

But then again maybe you should worry about the CBX if you're under the impression that not writing your name demonstrates some degree of legal skill and acumen.


Dude, with your attitude, I just don't know about this profession. And you think I should read your post and engage you intellectually? Lol. Students, some lawyers, like this guy, think it's fine to call those with whom they have a disagreement "morons." And they'll do it openly and unashamedly. Take note.


Trust me when I tell you that this is what everyone is saying about you behind your back on a regular basis. You don't even have an intellectual point to engage on because what you're saying makes no sense.

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 12:59 pm

9xSound wrote:Over the last 20 years, I have had a cup of coffee every single morning of my life except maybe four or five times. Unbelievably, the morning of the February 2015 CBX was one of those times. I had gotten a hotel and as I headed to the exam site, I could not find a convenient coffee outlet anywhere. And God forbid that I should try asking somebody. As a result, I went into the test the first morning feeling mentally numb, not sharp and wide awake from my usual caffeine jolt. That was disaster No. 1. Okay, not a "disaster," but definitely bad news.

Secondly, the third essay that morning was civ pro with 7th Amendment and physician-patient issues. I completely bombed this essay. This time, the word disaster fits. I forgot that there is no physician-patient privilege under the FRCP, and I simply didn't know the applicable rules regarding when the right to a jury trial must be exercised before it's waived. I analyzed logical and legal relevance like it was an evidence essay. I mean, everything I wrote was so far out in left field on the issues and rules compared to the model answers that I could only have gotten a 50. I had to make up rules based on reasonableness. The fact is, I wrote a sack of total crap, hitting non-issues and using made up rules. And yet I passed. The overall pass rate for that exam was only 39.5%.

The takeaway is that passing doesn't require perfection. If you bomb an essay, it isn't necessarily fatal, especially if you do well on the MBE — which I think I did. If you feel like you blew it on an essay or PT, don't kill yourself over it. You're not out of the running so long as you did okay on the rest of the exam.


I'd just like to point out the hypocrisy here.

Because apparently you fucked up doing legal analysis which is what the bar is designed to test and is more reflective of a skillset for a good attorney, yet you think it's reasonable that you passed and are among "the best". Then you would sincerely argue that someone who left their name off a PT....a petty clerical error at best and having nothing to do with legal analysis should fail the bar because they can't possibly be amongst "the best" because they made an error that has nothing to do with legal application and acumen.

But your failure to properly apply the law....that's not an error worthy of failing the bar, because that's not nearly as bad as an applicant writing their name on the PT.

GTFOH with that noise.

9xSound

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby 9xSound » Wed Aug 07, 2019 3:00 pm

rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:Over the last 20 years, I have had a cup of coffee every single morning of my life except maybe four or five times. Unbelievably, the morning of the February 2015 CBX was one of those times. I had gotten a hotel and as I headed to the exam site, I could not find a convenient coffee outlet anywhere. And God forbid that I should try asking somebody. As a result, I went into the test the first morning feeling mentally numb, not sharp and wide awake from my usual caffeine jolt. That was disaster No. 1. Okay, not a "disaster," but definitely bad news.

Secondly, the third essay that morning was civ pro with 7th Amendment and physician-patient issues. I completely bombed this essay. This time, the word disaster fits. I forgot that there is no physician-patient privilege under the FRCP, and I simply didn't know the applicable rules regarding when the right to a jury trial must be exercised before it's waived. I analyzed logical and legal relevance like it was an evidence essay. I mean, everything I wrote was so far out in left field on the issues and rules compared to the model answers that I could only have gotten a 50. I had to make up rules based on reasonableness. The fact is, I wrote a sack of total crap, hitting non-issues and using made up rules. And yet I passed. The overall pass rate for that exam was only 39.5%.

The takeaway is that passing doesn't require perfection. If you bomb an essay, it isn't necessarily fatal, especially if you do well on the MBE — which I think I did. If you feel like you blew it on an essay or PT, don't kill yourself over it. You're not out of the running so long as you did okay on the rest of the exam.


I'd just like to point out the hypocrisy here.

Because apparently you fucked up doing legal analysis which is what the bar is designed to test and is more reflective of a skillset for a good attorney, yet you think it's reasonable that you passed and are among "the best". Then you would sincerely argue that someone who left their name off a PT....a petty clerical error at best and having nothing to do with legal analysis should fail the bar because they can't possibly be amongst "the best" because they made an error that has nothing to do with legal application and acumen.

But your failure to properly apply the law....that's not an error worthy of failing the bar, because that's not nearly as bad as an applicant writing their name on the PT.

GTFOH with that noise.



LOL!! Didn''t you pass the bar some time ago? You're assuming facts not in evidence, my man. Look it up.

Bingo_Bongo

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Bingo_Bongo » Wed Aug 07, 2019 3:07 pm

My motto is don't be a dick just because everyone else is a dick. Be a dick because YOU want to be a dick. You have to own it.

P.S. I'm a dick. But not because other people are.

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perfunctory

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby perfunctory » Wed Aug 07, 2019 3:10 pm

Dude, the Cal Bar said it was a non-issue and they said it's fine.

cavalier1138

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby cavalier1138 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 4:43 pm

9xSound wrote:LOL!! Didn''t you pass the bar some time ago? You're assuming facts not in evidence, my man. Look it up.


We all know that the best lawyers needlessly insert legal jargon into their writing when discussing things in a non-legal context. Otherwise, how would anyone know that you're a lawyer?

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rcharter1978

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby rcharter1978 » Wed Aug 07, 2019 6:11 pm

9xSound wrote:Over the last 20 years, I have had a cup of coffee every single morning of my life except maybe four or five times. Unbelievably, the morning of the February 2015 CBX was one of those times. I had gotten a hotel and as I headed to the exam site, I could not find a convenient coffee outlet anywhere. And God forbid that I should try asking somebody. As a result, I went into the test the first morning feeling mentally numb, not sharp and wide awake from my usual caffeine jolt. That was disaster No. 1. Okay, not a "disaster," but definitely bad news.

Secondly, the third essay that morning was civ pro with 7th Amendment and physician-patient issues. I completely bombed this essay. This time, the word disaster fits. I forgot that there is no physician-patient privilege under the FRCP, and I simply didn't know the applicable rules regarding when the right to a jury trial must be exercised before it's waived. I analyzed logical and legal relevance like it was an evidence essay. I mean, everything I wrote was so far out in left field on the issues and rules compared to the model answers that I could only have gotten a 50. I had to make up rules based on reasonableness. The fact is, I wrote a sack of total crap, hitting non-issues and using made up rules. And yet I passed. The overall pass rate for that exam was only 39.5%.

The takeaway is that passing doesn't require perfection. If you bomb an essay, it isn't necessarily fatal, especially if you do well on the MBE — which I think I did. If you feel like you blew it on an essay or PT, don't kill yourself over it. You're not out of the running so long as you did okay on the rest of the exam.


9xSound wrote:
A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


9xSound wrote:
LOL!! Didn''t you pass the bar some time ago? You're assuming facts not in evidence, my man. Look it up.


First, I'm not a man, so you probably shouldnt assume facts not in evidence.

And by way of summary, you substantively fucked up an essay and think you deserve a legal license but someone who makes a clerical error by writing their name on a PT doesn't deserve a legal license.

Even though only your fuck up arguably has anything to do with demonstrating the substantive legal knowledge, ability and acumen.

Frankly, I don't think either error renders someone unworthy of a license, but if I had to pick the more egregious and relevant error, fucking up an essay question is way worse than forgetting to not write your name on a PT.

And the level of absolute assholery and gleeful fearmongering to come on this forum with people who are stressed over the bar and proclaim that someone doesn't deserve to pass because of a simple clerical error when you fucked up an entire essay and feel like you should have been granted a license is ridiculous.

Animal_Activist

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Animal_Activist » Wed Aug 07, 2019 7:28 pm

rcharter1978 wrote:
9xSound wrote:Over the last 20 years, I have had a cup of coffee every single morning of my life except maybe four or five times. Unbelievably, the morning of the February 2015 CBX was one of those times. I had gotten a hotel and as I headed to the exam site, I could not find a convenient coffee outlet anywhere. And God forbid that I should try asking somebody. As a result, I went into the test the first morning feeling mentally numb, not sharp and wide awake from my usual caffeine jolt. That was disaster No. 1. Okay, not a "disaster," but definitely bad news.

Secondly, the third essay that morning was civ pro with 7th Amendment and physician-patient issues. I completely bombed this essay. This time, the word disaster fits. I forgot that there is no physician-patient privilege under the FRCP, and I simply didn't know the applicable rules regarding when the right to a jury trial must be exercised before it's waived. I analyzed logical and legal relevance like it was an evidence essay. I mean, everything I wrote was so far out in left field on the issues and rules compared to the model answers that I could only have gotten a 50. I had to make up rules based on reasonableness. The fact is, I wrote a sack of total crap, hitting non-issues and using made up rules. And yet I passed. The overall pass rate for that exam was only 39.5%.

The takeaway is that passing doesn't require perfection. If you bomb an essay, it isn't necessarily fatal, especially if you do well on the MBE — which I think I did. If you feel like you blew it on an essay or PT, don't kill yourself over it. You're not out of the running so long as you did okay on the rest of the exam.


9xSound wrote:
A large component of the bar exam is whether the candidate demonstrates sufficient attention to detail that he or she can be safely turned loose with a license to practice law on an unsuspecting public. A candidate who so carelessly — or just plain stupidly — writes his or her real name on any portion of the test doesn't deserve a law license.


9xSound wrote:
LOL!! Didn''t you pass the bar some time ago? You're assuming facts not in evidence, my man. Look it up.


First, I'm not a man, so you probably shouldnt assume facts not in evidence.

And by way of summary, you substantively fucked up an essay and think you deserve a legal license but someone who makes a clerical error by writing their name on a PT doesn't deserve a legal license.

Even though only your fuck up arguably has anything to do with demonstrating the substantive legal knowledge, ability and acumen.

Frankly, I don't think either error renders someone unworthy of a license, but if I had to pick the more egregious and relevant error, fucking up an essay question is way worse than forgetting to not write your name on a PT.

And the level of absolute assholery and gleeful fearmongering to come on this forum with people who are stressed over the bar and proclaim that someone doesn't deserve to pass because of a simple clerical error when you fucked up an entire essay and feel like you should have been granted a license is ridiculous.



I absolutely agree. Something tells me that the people who are responding harshly on this forum are in their 20s. The older you get the more wiser you become and the more you realize that what they scare you with in your 1L year is not even realistic. I talked to attorneys about how much I need to know regarding ethical rules and they laugh and say that no one even remembers all those rules. I have also seen many documents submitted to courts with misspellings and names placed one line lower and no court decided to sanction the lawyer lol. Furthermore, I have realized that this test is not representative of your skills as a lawyer. It is just an exam and once you figure out how to beat it, you move on with your life.

So to your point, I am shocked that anyone would even say you fail just because you wrote your name when all they have to do is redact it and send it to another grader. I took this exam and had that same fear for a second that I might have put my name on the PT. Any grader that fails a person for that should be prohibited from ever grading another essay.

Bingo_Bongo

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Bingo_Bongo » Thu Aug 08, 2019 3:27 am

Animal_Activist wrote:I talked to attorneys about how much I need to know regarding ethical rules and they laugh and say that no one even remembers all those rules. I have also seen many documents submitted to courts with misspellings and names placed one line lower and no court decided to sanction the lawyer lol. Furthermore, I have realized that this test is not representative of your skills as a lawyer. It is just an exam and once you figure out how to beat it, you move on with your life.


Okay, I agree that putting your name on the PT should definitely not be grounds for failing it (or getting a huge chunk of your score auto knocked off), but you just made a really good argument AGAINST your point by bringing up all the really bad legal practices you witness.

Look, don't strive to be those attorneys. California does NOT need more shitty attorneys running around.

If you ask me, you should absolutely be proficient with your state's ethics rules. The fact that those guys laughed and said that "no one even remembers all those rules" is, for one thing, actually false. (I, along with most attorneys who actually give a darn about competently representing the people who pay us good money to represent them, certainly know California's Code of Professional Responsibility well enough that red flags will be raised when situations arise to implicate them). And number two, their conscious ignorance is the reason why you see so many incompetent attorneys in California making appearances in the bar discipline blotters for really stupid things. The state's PR rules regulate YOU. You should know them just as you would know the tax code if you represented clients on tax matters, or how you would know the SEC regs if you represented clients on corporate law matters.

And yes, really bad pleadings get filed with the courts all the time. Why? Because there are a ton of shitty attorneys running around who have absolutely no business representing people for money. If you work for a decent firm, they WILL care about typos in court pleadings. But even if you go solo, or work for a small firm that doesn't care about such things, don't be sloppy. If people are paying you money to take care of their problems for them, they deserve better.

I have realized that this test is not representative of your skills as a lawyer.


Unpopular opinion: it is. The bar directly tests your ability to understand a large volume of law, and apply it to complex fact patterns. That's exactly what being a lawyer is, and not everyone is cut out for it.

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Atmosphere

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Re: 2019 July California Bar

Postby Atmosphere » Thu Aug 08, 2019 9:21 am

As a name-writer, I feel personally attacked



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