Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

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cho8583

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Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby cho8583 » Wed May 24, 2017 12:10 am

Hi,

Just out of curiosity, is there any online prep course just for essay parts of the exam? There are many MBE prep courses with questions, but I never saw the course just for essays.. just wondering.

Anyone? :)

jtom195

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby jtom195 » Fri May 26, 2017 7:48 am

Yeah, there's a lot out there for the MBE, not as much for the MEE. I'm looking for a prep course for the MEE or some good supplemental study guides for the MEE? Any suggestions?

justwanttobealawyer

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby justwanttobealawyer » Fri May 26, 2017 10:16 am

jtom195 wrote:Yeah, there's a lot out there for the MBE, not as much for the MEE. I'm looking for a prep course for the MEE or some good supplemental study guides for the MEE? Any suggestions?


Seperac is great. He produces an MEE Master Outline which compiles all the MEE essays and a sample answer. It's a wonderful resource.

Lawyerinwaiting89

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby Lawyerinwaiting89 » Sun May 28, 2017 6:08 pm

jtom195 wrote:Yeah, there's a lot out there for the MBE, not as much for the MEE. I'm looking for a prep course for the MEE or some good supplemental study guides for the MEE? Any suggestions?


Also take a look at JD Advising. They have a lot of UBE course options, some expensive and some less expensive. They have a number of tailored choices depending on what your weaknesses are and how much prep and/or tutoring you would like. There are full courses, but I took the MEE Seminar, which is a one day course where they send you MEE materials ahead of time. Instead of standard commercial outlines, they broke the topics down by issues of highly tested to lesser tested issues and indicated the tests that the issued showed up on. It was pretty helpful. https://www.excellenceinlawschool.com/

squiggle

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby squiggle » Sun May 28, 2017 6:22 pm

justwanttobealawyer wrote:
jtom195 wrote:Yeah, there's a lot out there for the MBE, not as much for the MEE. I'm looking for a prep course for the MEE or some good supplemental study guides for the MEE? Any suggestions?


Seperac is great. He produces an MEE Master Outline which compiles all the MEE essays and a sample answer. It's a wonderful resource.


I second this; Seperac is awesome. I've taken three different states, and it used it for all of them.

JoeSeperac

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby JoeSeperac » Mon May 29, 2017 10:29 am

I have separate MEE materials for issue spotting and reviewing past MEEs (there is no better way to learn the exam than the exam itself).

In regards to black letter law, the MBE and MEE are too intertwined to be studied for separately. For example, MBE issues are tested on the MEE and MEE issues are tested on the MBE (especially with Civil Procedure). Furthermore, the MBE subjects often represent the majority of MEE questions. For example, on the July 2016 UBE exam, 68% of an examinee's MEE score (which is 30% of the total UBE score) came from MBE subjects (meaning 70% of an examinee’s total UBE score came from the 7 MBE subjects). On the Feb 2017 UBE exam, these percentages flip-flopped and 33% of an examinee's MEE score came from MBE subjects (meaning 60% of an examinee’s total UBE score came from the 7 MBE subjects). I expect NCBE’s testing of the MEE specific subjects on the MEE to wax and wane from exam to exam – on some exams a majority of the MEE will be based on the MEE specific subjects whereas other MEE exams will consist mainly of MBE subjects. However, if you attempt to study black letter law for the MEE separately, you are likely to duplicate your efforts and inefficiently over-study.

Furthermore, there are fewer “repeat” topics on the MEE as compared to the pre-UBE NY essays, necessitating the need for a broader/denser overall outline. In categorizing every single topic tested on the MEE since 1995, I determined that out of the 798 individual topics tested on the past 44 MEE exams, 519 of these topics were tested just once (65%) while 279 of these topics were tested more than once (35%). Thus, if you used an outline based solely on previously tested MEE topics, it would directly cover only about 35% of an upcoming MEE exam (looking at specific topics only). For example, following is my breakdown of the specific MEE topics on the F17 MEE. Of the 45 individual topics where you could have picked up points, only 20 were directly answerable from the law in past MEE questions going back to 1995. Taking into account topics that may be indirectly answered from past MEE questions, there would probably still be a void for 40% of the topics:

[+] Spoiler
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _1_Actual_authority
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _2_Disclosed_principal_a._Outside_scope
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _2_Disclosed_principal_b._Implied_warranty_of_authority
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _3_Partially_disclosed_principal_a._Outside_scope
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _3_Partially_disclosed_principal_b._Ratification
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_A._Authority: _4_Undisclosed_principal
BAP_Cat_II_Power_of_agent_to_bind_principal_B._Apparent_authority: _2_Outside_scope
BCL_Cat_IX_Shareholder_and_member_litigation_direct_derivative_and_class_litigation_B._Derivative_litigation: _1_Dismissal
BCL_Cat_V_Management_and_control_A._Shareholders: _4_Inspection_rights
BCL_Cat_V_Management_and_control_A._Shareholders: _4_Inspection_rights_b._Inspecting_corporate_books
BCL_Cat_VI_Fiduciary_duties_A._Directors_officers_and_shareholders: _1_Director_Duty_of_Care
BCL_Cat_VI_Fiduciary_duties_A._Directors_officers_and_shareholders: _1_Director_Duty_of_Care_a._Good_Faith_Standard
BCL_Cat_VI_Fiduciary_duties_A._Directors_officers_and_shareholders: _3_Business_Judgment_Rule
BCL_Cat_VI_Fiduciary_duties_A._Directors_officers_and_shareholders: _3_Business_Judgment_Rule_c._Illegal_acts
CFL_Cat_III_Choice_of_law_C._Application_in_specific_areas: _5_Family_law_b._Marriage
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_b._Scope_ii._UCC
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_c._Offer_i._Firm_Offer_Rule
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_c._Offer_i._Option_contract
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_c._Offer_i._Reliance
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_c._Offer_i._Revocability
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_A._Mutual_assent: _1_Offer_and_acceptance_e._Revocation
CTR_Cat_I_Formation_of_contracts_B._Consideration: _1_Types_a._Bargain_and_exchange_and_substitutes_for_bargain
FAM_Cat_I_Getting_married_B._Limitations_on_who_may_marry: _1_Bigamy
FAM_Cat_I_Getting_married_E._Common_law_marriage_and_other_curative_or_mitigative_doctrines
FAM_Cat_III_Separation_divorce_dissolution_and_annulment_D._Division_of_property: _1_Marital_property
FAM_Cat_III_Separation_divorce_dissolution_and_annulment_D._Division_of_property: _3_Factors_relevant_to_property_distribution
FAM_Cat_III_Separation_divorce_dissolution_and_annulment_D._Division_of_property: _4_Putative_spouse_doctrine
FAM_Cat_IV_Child_custody_B._Visitation: _1_Third_parties
FAM_Cat_V_Rights_of_unmarried_cohabitants_A._Rights_of_cohabitants_inter_se: _1_Right_to_assets
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _3_Assignment_and_subletting_a._Assignment_i._Restrictions_on_Assignments
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _3_Assignment_and_subletting_a._Assignment_ii._Witholding_consent
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _4_Termination_surrender_mitigation_of_damages_and_anticipatory_breach_b._Surrender
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _4_Termination_surrender_mitigation_of_damages_and_anticipatory_breach_c._Abandonment
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _4_Termination_surrender_mitigation_of_damages_and_anticipatory_breach_d._Mitigation_of_damages_i._No_mitigation_rule
RLP_Cat_I_Ownership_C._The_law_of_landlord_and_tenant: _4_Termination_surrender_mitigation_of_damages_and_anticipatory_breach_d._Mitigation_of_damages_ii._Duty_to_mitigate
TFI_Cat_I_Trusts_C._Types_of_trusts: _1_Revocable_b._Elective_Share
TFI_Cat_I_Trusts_C._Types_of_trusts: _1_Revocable_c._Illusory_transfer_doctrine
TFI_Cat_I_Trusts_C._Types_of_trusts: _1_Revocable_d._Fraudulent_transfer_doctrine
TFI_Cat_I_Trusts_G._Modification
TFI_Cat_II_Future_interests_D._Powers_of_appointment
TFI_Cat_II_Future_interests_D._Powers_of_appointment: _2_exercise_of_power
TFI_Cat_II_Future_interests_D._Powers_of_appointment: _4_Invalid_appointments

cho8583

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby cho8583 » Mon May 29, 2017 8:13 pm

Thanks guys for the input! I do know some companies provides MEE subjects outlines and sample essays like Studicata and Seperac, but I was just wondering whether there is a company which does essay grading on top of the usual stuff, just for the essay portion.

JoeSeperac wrote:I have separate MEE materials for issue spotting and reviewing past MEEs (there is no better way to learn the exam than the exam itself).


Joe, I've heard so much about you, but does your program have essay grading too?

JoeSeperac

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby JoeSeperac » Tue May 30, 2017 5:36 pm

No, I don’t grade essays. Joe Seperac’s subjective opinion of your essay might be a little better than Joe Schmoe’s, but it’s still a subjective opinion. According to NCBE, the reliability of the MBE scaled score is 0.90. NCBE found that for the essays to have a reliability of 0.90, they needed to be 16 hours long with 32 different essay questions. NCBE found that for the MPT to have a reliability of 0.90, it needed to be 33 hours long with 22 different MPT items. see The Bar Examiner: Volume 77, Number 3, August 2008. Unreliability in essay scoring means that you can have a very high essay score on one exam and then a very low essay score on another exam even though your level of knowledge has not changed (or even improved). Thus, answering only 6 essays and 2 MPTs make unreliability in essay scoring guaranteed. Unreliability in high-stakes exams makes it harder to distinguish applicants sufficiently to determine who is qualified versus unqualified (which is why the written scores are scaled to the MBE).

So how does unreliability in essay scoring occur? Let me give you an example. Take a look at the following essay grading analysis I made of a sample of J14 essays. You will need to Zoom in on this PDF to read the material (I try to put a number of essays on one page so it can be visually compared).
http://seperac.com/pdf/J14-Essay%20Anal ... ay%201.pdf

This PDF is a small sample of 15 answers from Essay 1 from the July 2014 exam. It contains obvious and serious mistakes in grading. As part of an essay analysis I conducted on the pre-UBE essays, I tried to determine the weight of each issue and calculate each examinee’s score for each issue (for example, PROF-RES: Solicitation/Referral Fees (Seperac Est. score of 2/10)). The final result was the “Seperac Estimated Score.” Bar graders have neither the time or the interest in putting similarly scored essays side by side to see if the grading is indeed accurate. However, when you do this, grading inaccuracies often come to light. For example, if you look at the 5th essay (Jul2014-Essay-001-ID 002-Typed-Score 38.66), this “Examinee J” received a score of 38.66. If you compare this essay to the other essays that scored around 38.66, you will see that this essay is far superior. I feel this essay score was severely discounted – just compare this essay to the released Model Answers and you will see what I mean. How this essay is not a passing essay is a complete mystery to me. Now let’s suppose that you studied heavily for this exam and put effort into the essays and you were the examinee that wrote the above essay in question. You would have written what was objectively a good essay that should have been well above passing, but instead would have received a terrible score. This is what no one can assess – the unreliability of subjective essay grading.

Luckily, the MEE questions are less prone to such unreliability because they are shorter and there is a grading rubric. Thus, if you have the released MEE questions, you can essentially grade yourself by comparing your answers to the NCBE answer analyses. According to the maker of the MEE: “NCBE’s grader training and materials also assign weights to subparts in a question. So an examinee who performs well on one subpart of an MEE question worth 25% of the total score that could be awarded for that question is not assured a 6 unless he performs well on the other parts of the question, too, in comparison with other examinees. In other words, there is a weighting framework for assigning points, which helps to keep graders calibrated and consistent.” see the March 2015 NCBE Testing Column: Judith A. Gundersen, The Testing Column, Essay Grading Fundamentals, The Bar Examiner (March 2015). This differs from pre-UBE essay grading where it appeared the graders reviewed the essays more holistically (i.e. looking at the overall answer and then assigning a score). On the MEE, the graders are somewhat constrained by the grading weights, meaning that a well written answer with good reasoning that misses issues will probably score lower than a poorly written answer with basic analysis that correctly identifies all the issues.

On the subscription site, I have comparisons that let you compare graded essays/MPTs. For example, following are small samples of the February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/

If you are willing to self-evaluate, you can write an answer to a comparison question and then compare your answer to other graded answers (one day I will have a automated way of doing this). For example, you can download the Feb 2010 MPT from NCBE’s website, answer the State of Franklin vs McLain MPT and then compare your answer to the graded ones in the comparison:
http://www.ncbex.org/pdfviewer/?file=%2 ... ment%2F178

If this is too much effort, you can simply look at passing and above-passing essays/MPTs. For example, one subscriber told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” Put simply, good essays/MPTs look like other good essays/MPTs.

jtom195

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby jtom195 » Wed May 31, 2017 1:21 pm

JoeSeperac wrote:No, I don’t grade essays. Joe Seperac’s subjective opinion of your essay might be a little better than Joe Schmoe’s, but it’s still a subjective opinion. According to NCBE, the reliability of the MBE scaled score is 0.90. NCBE found that for the essays to have a reliability of 0.90, they needed to be 16 hours long with 32 different essay questions. NCBE found that for the MPT to have a reliability of 0.90, it needed to be 33 hours long with 22 different MPT items. see The Bar Examiner: Volume 77, Number 3, August 2008. Unreliability in essay scoring means that you can have a very high essay score on one exam and then a very low essay score on another exam even though your level of knowledge has not changed (or even improved). Thus, answering only 6 essays and 2 MPTs make unreliability in essay scoring guaranteed. Unreliability in high-stakes exams makes it harder to distinguish applicants sufficiently to determine who is qualified versus unqualified (which is why the written scores are scaled to the MBE).

So how does unreliability in essay scoring occur? Let me give you an example. Take a look at the following essay grading analysis I made of a sample of J14 essays. You will need to Zoom in on this PDF to read the material (I try to put a number of essays on one page so it can be visually compared).
http://seperac.com/pdf/J14-Essay%20Anal ... ay%201.pdf

This PDF is a small sample of 15 answers from Essay 1 from the July 2014 exam. It contains obvious and serious mistakes in grading. As part of an essay analysis I conducted on the pre-UBE essays, I tried to determine the weight of each issue and calculate each examinee’s score for each issue (for example, PROF-RES: Solicitation/Referral Fees (Seperac Est. score of 2/10)). The final result was the “Seperac Estimated Score.” Bar graders have neither the time or the interest in putting similarly scored essays side by side to see if the grading is indeed accurate. However, when you do this, grading inaccuracies often come to light. For example, if you look at the 5th essay (Jul2014-Essay-001-ID 002-Typed-Score 38.66), this “Examinee J” received a score of 38.66. If you compare this essay to the other essays that scored around 38.66, you will see that this essay is far superior. I feel this essay score was severely discounted – just compare this essay to the released Model Answers and you will see what I mean. How this essay is not a passing essay is a complete mystery to me. Now let’s suppose that you studied heavily for this exam and put effort into the essays and you were the examinee that wrote the above essay in question. You would have written what was objectively a good essay that should have been well above passing, but instead would have received a terrible score. This is what no one can assess – the unreliability of subjective essay grading.

Luckily, the MEE questions are less prone to such unreliability because they are shorter and there is a grading rubric. Thus, if you have the released MEE questions, you can essentially grade yourself by comparing your answers to the NCBE answer analyses. According to the maker of the MEE: “NCBE’s grader training and materials also assign weights to subparts in a question. So an examinee who performs well on one subpart of an MEE question worth 25% of the total score that could be awarded for that question is not assured a 6 unless he performs well on the other parts of the question, too, in comparison with other examinees. In other words, there is a weighting framework for assigning points, which helps to keep graders calibrated and consistent.” see the March 2015 NCBE Testing Column: Judith A. Gundersen, The Testing Column, Essay Grading Fundamentals, The Bar Examiner (March 2015). This differs from pre-UBE essay grading where it appeared the graders reviewed the essays more holistically (i.e. looking at the overall answer and then assigning a score). On the MEE, the graders are somewhat constrained by the grading weights, meaning that a well written answer with good reasoning that misses issues will probably score lower than a poorly written answer with basic analysis that correctly identifies all the issues.

On the subscription site, I have comparisons that let you compare graded essays/MPTs. For example, following are small samples of the February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/

If you are willing to self-evaluate, you can write an answer to a comparison question and then compare your answer to other graded answers (one day I will have a automated way of doing this). For example, you can download the Feb 2010 MPT from NCBE’s website, answer the State of Franklin vs McLain MPT and then compare your answer to the graded ones in the comparison:
http://www.ncbex.org/pdfviewer/?file=%2 ... ment%2F178

If this is too much effort, you can simply look at passing and above-passing essays/MPTs. For example, one subscriber told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” Put simply, good essays/MPTs look like other good essays/MPTs.


Hey Joe!

Thanks for the information, this all sounds really good. Couple questions. Do we have to subscribe to your site to see the "good" and "bad" essay examples for comparison purposes? Are these different from the model answers released by the NCBE?

Thank you!

JoeSeperac

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby JoeSeperac » Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:44 pm

jtom195 wrote:
Hey Joe!

Thanks for the information, this all sounds really good. Couple questions. Do we have to subscribe to your site to see the "good" and "bad" essay examples for comparison purposes? Are these different from the model answers released by the NCBE?

Thank you!



The MEE and MPT Comparisons (which are based on graded examinee essays) are accessible by subscribers or non-subscribers who submit their essays to me for that exam. This is how it works:

1) If you fail the UBE exam and have a copy of your essays, you email them to me.
2) I transcribe your essays and statistically analyze them.
3) Once I have a large enough sample of essays (usually 20-30 examinees for a February exam or 50-60 examinees for a July exam), I create the MEE/MPT Analysis for that exam.
4) I then email you a free 37+ page essay analysis that statistically compares your MEE/MPT answers to everyone else who sent me their essays. A sample of the J16 Analysis (37 pages) is here:
http://www.seperac.com/pdf/Sample-Essay ... 202016.pdf
This MEE/MPT Analysis is confidential – I don't share your essays with anyone and no one else sees them. All I do is transcribe your essays and make the report once I have a large enough sample. NOTE: I plan to start comparing the MEE essays to the point sheets so the MEE section of the analysis will be similar to the MPT section of the analysis, giving you even more insight into your MEE/MPT answers.
5) When I send you the MEE/MPT Analysis, I ask you if you want to participate in the MEE/MPT Comparison. If you say No, nothing else happens with your essays and no one ever sees them except me. If you say Yes, I include your essays in the MEE/MPT Comparison which lets you see your answers compared to everyone else's side-by-side. Following are very small samples of my February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/
This Comparison is viewable by everyone who participates in it and also by subscribers. In the Comparison, everything is redacted (I even check your MPTs to make sure you didn't mention your name by mistake) so there is nothing to identify you. The majority of examinees decide to participate once they see their Analysis (out of the 500+ examinees that have sent me their essays for the Analysis, only 7 have opted out of the Comparison). I have been doing these Comparisons since 2010 and never has an examinee told me their confidentiality was compromised in any way.
6) If you participate in the Comparison, I give you a $40 coupon code if you decide to later subscribe to the full subscription site (where you can view the Comparisons for other exams).

Both the Analysis and the Comparison are great ways to get some useful insights into your MEEs/MPTs. For example, one of the more useful aspects of the MEE/MPT Analysis is a “Top 20 Words” analysis that reports the top 20 words the above average answers used that you did not. Through this “Top 20 Words” list, I find that failing examinees sometimes fail to use IRAC phrases such as “whether”, “here”, “therefore”, or “however.” This tells me the examinee’s essay is probably not as organized as it could be. Other times the examinees fail to use analysis words such as “because”, “since” , or “as.” In an IRAC analysis, “because” is the single most important word to use when analyzing the facts in the question. The failure to use words such as "because", "since" and "as" will negatively affect the analysis portion of your essay and can only hurt your score. Lastly, examinees often fail to use the legal terminology associated with a particular essay topic. I refer to these terms as “buzz-words.” I believe that graders do not spend a lot of time reviewing an essay, so the failure to use buzz-words (to signal to the grader that you understand the topic) can hurt your essay score. Put simply, absence of such words indicates the examinee may not be discussing things he/she needs to discuss.

The MEE/MPT Comparison is a fantastic way to visually identify what you did wrong on the MEE/MPT by looking at your essays side by side against others. You can look at exactly passing answers to see how much (or how little) is required for an exactly passing score. When you look at the text comparison, you start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. The PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side) let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers). For example, one examinee (non-subscriber) who failed F15 told me: "I did much better on my essays this time due in large part to your comparison tool. I found that to be extremely helpful." For the F15 exam, this examinee's 5-Essay average was 53.74 (a passing essay average for the Feb 2015 exam was 51.43). Based on 196 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 9/196 (this means the examinee had a 5-Essay average better than 95.4% of the examinees that sent me their Feb 2015 score information). In July 2014, this examinee had a 5-Essay average was 45.22 (a passing essay average for the July 2014 exam was 47.83). Based on 315 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 131/315 (which was better than 58.4% of the examinees that sent me their July 2014 scores).

Thus, with the MEE/MPT Analysis you can statistically compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs while with the MEE/MPT Comparison, you can visually compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs. On the subscription site, I have Comparisons for the last 15 MPT exams but only the J16 MEE since NY only switched in J16 (F17 to follow soon). For example, with the July 2015 MPT Comparison (Opinion Letter), you can examine 63 graded MPTs (for a total of 1,800+ comparisons). For the July 2016 MEE Comparison, for each of the six MEE questions, there are 741 comparisons based on 33 examinee essays.

jtom195

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Re: Essay (MEE+MPT) Prep Course?

Postby jtom195 » Sun Jun 04, 2017 2:20 pm

JoeSeperac wrote:
jtom195 wrote:
Hey Joe!

Thanks for the information, this all sounds really good. Couple questions. Do we have to subscribe to your site to see the "good" and "bad" essay examples for comparison purposes? Are these different from the model answers released by the NCBE?

Thank you!



The MEE and MPT Comparisons (which are based on graded examinee essays) are accessible by subscribers or non-subscribers who submit their essays to me for that exam. This is how it works:

1) If you fail the UBE exam and have a copy of your essays, you email them to me.
2) I transcribe your essays and statistically analyze them.
3) Once I have a large enough sample of essays (usually 20-30 examinees for a February exam or 50-60 examinees for a July exam), I create the MEE/MPT Analysis for that exam.
4) I then email you a free 37+ page essay analysis that statistically compares your MEE/MPT answers to everyone else who sent me their essays. A sample of the J16 Analysis (37 pages) is here:
http://www.seperac.com/pdf/Sample-Essay ... 202016.pdf
This MEE/MPT Analysis is confidential – I don't share your essays with anyone and no one else sees them. All I do is transcribe your essays and make the report once I have a large enough sample. NOTE: I plan to start comparing the MEE essays to the point sheets so the MEE section of the analysis will be similar to the MPT section of the analysis, giving you even more insight into your MEE/MPT answers.
5) When I send you the MEE/MPT Analysis, I ask you if you want to participate in the MEE/MPT Comparison. If you say No, nothing else happens with your essays and no one ever sees them except me. If you say Yes, I include your essays in the MEE/MPT Comparison which lets you see your answers compared to everyone else's side-by-side. Following are very small samples of my February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/
This Comparison is viewable by everyone who participates in it and also by subscribers. In the Comparison, everything is redacted (I even check your MPTs to make sure you didn't mention your name by mistake) so there is nothing to identify you. The majority of examinees decide to participate once they see their Analysis (out of the 500+ examinees that have sent me their essays for the Analysis, only 7 have opted out of the Comparison). I have been doing these Comparisons since 2010 and never has an examinee told me their confidentiality was compromised in any way.
6) If you participate in the Comparison, I give you a $40 coupon code if you decide to later subscribe to the full subscription site (where you can view the Comparisons for other exams).

Both the Analysis and the Comparison are great ways to get some useful insights into your MEEs/MPTs. For example, one of the more useful aspects of the MEE/MPT Analysis is a “Top 20 Words” analysis that reports the top 20 words the above average answers used that you did not. Through this “Top 20 Words” list, I find that failing examinees sometimes fail to use IRAC phrases such as “whether”, “here”, “therefore”, or “however.” This tells me the examinee’s essay is probably not as organized as it could be. Other times the examinees fail to use analysis words such as “because”, “since” , or “as.” In an IRAC analysis, “because” is the single most important word to use when analyzing the facts in the question. The failure to use words such as "because", "since" and "as" will negatively affect the analysis portion of your essay and can only hurt your score. Lastly, examinees often fail to use the legal terminology associated with a particular essay topic. I refer to these terms as “buzz-words.” I believe that graders do not spend a lot of time reviewing an essay, so the failure to use buzz-words (to signal to the grader that you understand the topic) can hurt your essay score. Put simply, absence of such words indicates the examinee may not be discussing things he/she needs to discuss.

The MEE/MPT Comparison is a fantastic way to visually identify what you did wrong on the MEE/MPT by looking at your essays side by side against others. You can look at exactly passing answers to see how much (or how little) is required for an exactly passing score. When you look at the text comparison, you start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. The PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side) let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers). For example, one examinee (non-subscriber) who failed F15 told me: "I did much better on my essays this time due in large part to your comparison tool. I found that to be extremely helpful." For the F15 exam, this examinee's 5-Essay average was 53.74 (a passing essay average for the Feb 2015 exam was 51.43). Based on 196 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 9/196 (this means the examinee had a 5-Essay average better than 95.4% of the examinees that sent me their Feb 2015 score information). In July 2014, this examinee had a 5-Essay average was 45.22 (a passing essay average for the July 2014 exam was 47.83). Based on 315 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 131/315 (which was better than 58.4% of the examinees that sent me their July 2014 scores).

Thus, with the MEE/MPT Analysis you can statistically compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs while with the MEE/MPT Comparison, you can visually compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs. On the subscription site, I have Comparisons for the last 15 MPT exams but only the J16 MEE since NY only switched in J16 (F17 to follow soon). For example, with the July 2015 MPT Comparison (Opinion Letter), you can examine 63 graded MPTs (for a total of 1,800+ comparisons). For the July 2016 MEE Comparison, for each of the six MEE questions, there are 741 comparisons based on 33 examinee essays.


This is awesome! Thank you. I'm actually a first-time taker, but this definitely sounds like a great service for me to look into as I currently have very little to compare my practice essays to.



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