2015 February California Bar Exam

cndounda1985
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2014 2:31 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby cndounda1985 » Sun Jan 25, 2015 6:21 pm

This question is directly to a male human, I'm currently hitting about 61% on my MBE topics and about 66% when I do mixed MBEs although it varies, some days I'm a bit lower. Am I at a good point for MBEs right now a month before bar exam or should i already be hitting 70% right now? I've focused a bit more on essays since I'm a repeater, but doing the MBEs has also helped me retain and learn a lot of the smaller nuances especially for Ks. I just want to make sure I'm on the right track.

This time last year when I took the Feb 2014 exam, I was in the low 40%-50% around this time.

Thanks for any input!

User avatar
a male human
Posts: 1685
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:42 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby a male human » Sun Jan 25, 2015 7:04 pm

cndounda1985 wrote:This question is directly to a male human, I'm currently hitting about 61% on my MBE topics and about 66% when I do mixed MBEs although it varies, some days I'm a bit lower. Am I at a good point for MBEs right now a month before bar exam or should i already be hitting 70% right now? I've focused a bit more on essays since I'm a repeater, but doing the MBEs has also helped me retain and learn a lot of the smaller nuances especially for Ks. I just want to make sure I'm on the right track.

This time last year when I took the Feb 2014 exam, I was in the low 40%-50% around this time.

Thanks for any input!

Gosh, putting the pressure on me!

I'm a bit unclear on what you mean by 61% on MBE topics (your weak topics?) and 66% mixed. If you're 66% mixed right now you're doing just fine. I was ~130/200 around this time when I took the midterm at the back of Emanuel's Strategies & Tactics Vol. 1.

So keep it up every day. If you know your weak topics (good job tracking it btw), I would shift more of your practice drilling those subjects or even topics within that subject. For example, I was horrible at crim pro in generally and specifically negligence within torts, so I studied more of those.

I think if you hit 65-70% by end of Feb then you know your subjects decently well and you probably won't freak out on the real MBE.

cndounda1985
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2014 2:31 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby cndounda1985 » Sun Jan 25, 2015 7:43 pm

Lol sorry didn't mean to put too much pressure on you. I've just used a lot of your tips (as well as the Feb 14 CBX thread) and they've been really helpful this time around. Yea, strict liability is killing me in torts and Crim pro which is crazy since I worked as a PD should be doing well on crim pro. Thanks for your quick reply.

redblueyellow
Posts: 465
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:50 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby redblueyellow » Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:25 pm

a male human wrote:You're not doing anything wrong. It's natural to feel familiar with something yet not be able to reproduce it. However, mere familiarity is not enough. This is why you should start using the material in action so that you can do the same on game day. Just the process of recall or attempting to recall will harden that connection in your brain and further solidify in whatever you were trying to recall. http://www.barexamtoolbox.com/memorizat ... ple-1-2-3/

What is causing your overwhelm?
- If it's the sheer volume, break it down into subjects. Even if you start now, you have about 2 days a subject. Take one day to review and one day to practice essays (if you're taking this route, you still should do MBEs every day and maybe a PT a weekend).
- If you don't have enough time to practice essays, don't do whole essays but just identify the issues and write out the rules, ideally after you have a few whole essays under your belt for each subject. You will see which issues are more frequently tested and automatically weigh the importance of those issues and rules thereof as you practice.


Thank you. I took at a look at the link and compared it your comments. I think I'm feeling overwhelmed due to the quantity of information. For example, I'm reading through Kaplan's memorization book for Contracts today. It's around 50 pages. From that, how am I supposed to 1. discern (accurately) what to memorize and 2. of most importance, to what depth? Then I can spend a few hours just rote memorizing after having reviewed a few essays and sample answers on Kaplan's site (or on baressays.com). Good, then I'm good for those couple topics/essays that I had time to look at. Then it's on the next subject, and at the end of the day, I've ran out of time to go back to Con law which I had reviewed a few weeks ago.

I get that answering essays for the bar is not like finals from law school. Namely, we don't have outlines/book/open notes for the bar, but the ascertaining correct depth is also challenging. For example, in law school, generally, more is better (only if it's relevant+accurate). For the bar, it seems that quantity (in issues) and accuracy are important, but not depth. But how deep? On one of the Kaplan model essays for an evidence question ("discuss if a,b,c,x,y,z can be admitted") there were multiple reasons why those pieces could non-hearsay. However, the model essay picked only one potential hearsay exception for each point and then moved on.

On the Winnin' Time book and some of the essays from baressays.com, the author/student will mention legal/logical relevance for each call of the question. For the Kaplan model essays, that happens only in the first call of the question and disregards for the other points. Which one do I need to do? Which one is right?

How am I supposed to remember all the elements for CL+UCC in contracts, FRE+CA in evidence, Fed Civ Pro+CA, Corp+CA, and keep them all straight in my head? I can barely remember just the CL, just the FRE, so forth.

This exam isn't about testing legal ability, it's nothing more than a memorization exercise.

User avatar
a male human
Posts: 1685
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:42 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby a male human » Tue Jan 27, 2015 2:36 am

redblueyellow wrote:
a male human wrote:You're not doing anything wrong. It's natural to feel familiar with something yet not be able to reproduce it. However, mere familiarity is not enough. This is why you should start using the material in action so that you can do the same on game day. Just the process of recall or attempting to recall will harden that connection in your brain and further solidify in whatever you were trying to recall. http://www.barexamtoolbox.com/memorizat ... ple-1-2-3/

What is causing your overwhelm?
- If it's the sheer volume, break it down into subjects. Even if you start now, you have about 2 days a subject. Take one day to review and one day to practice essays (if you're taking this route, you still should do MBEs every day and maybe a PT a weekend).
- If you don't have enough time to practice essays, don't do whole essays but just identify the issues and write out the rules, ideally after you have a few whole essays under your belt for each subject. You will see which issues are more frequently tested and automatically weigh the importance of those issues and rules thereof as you practice.


Thank you. I took at a look at the link and compared it your comments. I think I'm feeling overwhelmed due to the quantity of information. For example, I'm reading through Kaplan's memorization book for Contracts today. It's around 50 pages. From that, how am I supposed to 1. discern (accurately) what to memorize and 2. of most importance, to what depth? Then I can spend a few hours just rote memorizing after having reviewed a few essays and sample answers on Kaplan's site (or on baressays.com). Good, then I'm good for those couple topics/essays that I had time to look at. Then it's on the next subject, and at the end of the day, I've ran out of time to go back to Con law which I had reviewed a few weeks ago.

I get that answering essays for the bar is not like finals from law school. Namely, we don't have outlines/book/open notes for the bar, but the ascertaining correct depth is also challenging. For example, in law school, generally, more is better (only if it's relevant+accurate). For the bar, it seems that quantity (in issues) and accuracy are important, but not depth. But how deep? On one of the Kaplan model essays for an evidence question ("discuss if a,b,c,x,y,z can be admitted") there were multiple reasons why those pieces could non-hearsay. However, the model essay picked only one potential hearsay exception for each point and then moved on.

On the Winnin' Time book and some of the essays from baressays.com, the author/student will mention legal/logical relevance for each call of the question. For the Kaplan model essays, that happens only in the first call of the question and disregards for the other points. Which one do I need to do? Which one is right?

How am I supposed to remember all the elements for CL+UCC in contracts, FRE+CA in evidence, Fed Civ Pro+CA, Corp+CA, and keep them all straight in my head? I can barely remember just the CL, just the FRE, so forth.

This exam isn't about testing legal ability, it's nothing more than a memorization exercise.

I should clarify the brief answer I gave earlier here:
a male human wrote:1. Test yourself in actual application (practice essays and MBEs).
2. Understand the concepts and know how to paraphrase the concepts into succinct and accurate statements.
3. Rote memorize the outline. As you practice, you can see which issues are important; focus on those first.


You can't memorize all 50 pages of contracts, let alone 700 pages for all the subjects. You shouldn't try to memorize the rules word for word. There isn't one true way to recite the rules.

But you should know certain issues that will cue you to remember the things that are associated with that cue. If you understand a concept and make it make sense to you, it will become easier to remember and recite it (this is #2 on my previous post).

This is still a shitload of material. As you say, how do you know which ones to you should know? Some issues are tested more than others. Those might be worth investigating further.

How do you know which ones are tested more than others? Do practice essays (#1) that are on the State Bar website, or you can look at Kaplan's frequency chart on the website.

Some things still need to be rote memorized (#3). I remember that for torts negligence, I liked this one particular way to open the discussion. It had all the elements in a readable way before I honed in on each element (duty, breach, etc.). I had a particularly hard time remembering the rule for organizational standing in con law; there wasn't a connection of cues that made sense to me, just a series of three requirements. I kept repeating the rule until I remembered it.

And yes, there are important jurisdictional distinctions, but honestly, you don't need to know all the rules and distinctions perfectly. Unless there are critical elements that will change your whole analysis, it's enough to just have a decent accuracy. I'm sure there are people who don't really distinguish MR and CA rules on PR and still pass. CA civ pro is another subject you can half ass (there aren't too many big topics to know anyway--anti-SLAPP, small/unlimited/limited, some terminology and I think there were differences in venue). FRE was based on CEC, so there are also few distinctions there. It probably makes sense to study the broad jurisdiction first and then study the few distinctions.

As for keeping track of what you studied recently, you can take notes, make and/or use a condensed outline (easier to handle than flipping through tomes and searching for the right tab and ripping them because the book is too goddamn heavy).

So that's WHAT to memorize. How much in depth? You can tell how important an issue is by how many facts there are that trigger rule elements associated with the issue. The facts fit around the issues tested. That is, the examiners have certain issues in mind and intentionally craft the facts around them. I don't see any other way because the facts have to be carefully presented; they're supposed to be the ideal statement of facts. If they did it the other way around (draft facts and decide what the issues are), there would be no consistent way to grade, no consistent way to test issues they want to test. The more facts there are to discuss, the more you should include them. They are lost children, waiting for you to corral them under the appropriate issue heading.

By the way, Kaplan's model essays fucking suck, so don't copy those. Their rule paragraphs are gigantic and not succinct at all. They don't discuss all the relevant issues.

If you want to be better at essays, I would recommend studying 65+ and 65- essays on BarEssays (is there anyone who still doesn't have a subscription?), looking at Barbri's essay materials, or even reading sample answers from the State Bar. Incidentally, the sample answers are great for a primer on topics you don't understand.

redblueyellow
Posts: 465
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:50 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby redblueyellow » Tue Jan 27, 2015 3:08 am

a male human wrote:You can't memorize all 50 pages of contracts, let alone 700 pages for all the subjects. You shouldn't try to memorize the rules word for word. There isn't one true way to recite the rules.


Thank you, again. That post definitely reduced my anxiety--at least for a little bit.

Kaplan's frequency chart was definitely helpful last time. I prioritized subjects that show up more often. However, with the new Civ Pro addition, I'm thinking that Civ Pro/Cal Civ Pro will have a more prominent role this exam (essays), which means that it's going to throw off Kaplan's statistics for an exam period.

Right, torts/evidence seem to be "easy" subjects for rote memorization, in that there's a definite layout that once can learn if they just write and write and write over and over again. I plan on doing that. You hit the nail on the head for con law; I did well in school, but that was because of being able to have an outline. Con law is easy with an outline, though.

With regards to the jurisdictional distinctions, how about something like the UCC? There are some UCC rules that if applied, are either sufficiently distinct from the common law to where a grader would raise their eye brows if I missed it, or they're the opposite of CL to where I'd have an incorrect answer. That scares me a lot. If the call asks "answer with UCC" or it's a goods question, I'm basically screwed. How would you handle that?

I'm REALLY glad you told me that Kaplan's essays are over the top. In terms of professional models, I've only had access to Kaplan; I did purchase a baressays.com sub, but I was cautious of relying on it too much (even the higher scores) because those were student answers. The model answers from baressays seem just as convoluted as the ones from Kaplan (and often arrive at a different conclusion which is a bit confusing). I don't have a means of obtaining barbri essays, but I'll place more of an emphasis on baressays/state bar answers (although the state bar answers can be quite lengthy at times too!).

User avatar
Elms
Posts: 180
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2008 2:06 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby Elms » Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:27 pm

I'm finding that reading through sample essays and just extremely basic issue spotting (writing down a one sentence rule per issue, basically... or even just listing the elements of a tort I spot or something like that) is helping tremendously with memorizing the law. Then I read sample answers to see how similarly/differently the issues I found were to the sample answers.

I don't think you should do this at the expense of writing out an essay or two in full, to make sure you understand how you respond in timed conditions. But the sets of facts have really helped me contextualize the black letter law. If I do a few Wills essays, for example, then a week later I do another Wills essay, I remember, "Oh, this is similar to the facts on the XYZ essay I issue spotted last week." It has been much more effective at memorization for me than flash cards or rote memorization from an outline.

And it's definitely true that the more past essays you read, the more you start to see and recognize the same issues over and over. This really solidifies them in your mind, I think.

adonai
Posts: 1033
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2007 9:09 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby adonai » Tue Jan 27, 2015 6:13 pm

The sample answers for July 2014 are now up on the calbar website http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/Examina ... Exams.aspx

User avatar
a male human
Posts: 1685
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:42 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby a male human » Tue Jan 27, 2015 7:33 pm

redblueyellow wrote:
a male human wrote:You can't memorize all 50 pages of contracts, let alone 700 pages for all the subjects. You shouldn't try to memorize the rules word for word. There isn't one true way to recite the rules.


Thank you, again. That post definitely reduced my anxiety--at least for a little bit.

Kaplan's frequency chart was definitely helpful last time. I prioritized subjects that show up more often. However, with the new Civ Pro addition, I'm thinking that Civ Pro/Cal Civ Pro will have a more prominent role this exam (essays), which means that it's going to throw off Kaplan's statistics for an exam period.

Right, torts/evidence seem to be "easy" subjects for rote memorization, in that there's a definite layout that once can learn if they just write and write and write over and over again. I plan on doing that. You hit the nail on the head for con law; I did well in school, but that was because of being able to have an outline. Con law is easy with an outline, though.

With regards to the jurisdictional distinctions, how about something like the UCC? There are some UCC rules that if applied, are either sufficiently distinct from the common law to where a grader would raise their eye brows if I missed it, or they're the opposite of CL to where I'd have an incorrect answer. That scares me a lot. If the call asks "answer with UCC" or it's a goods question, I'm basically screwed. How would you handle that?

I'm REALLY glad you told me that Kaplan's essays are over the top. In terms of professional models, I've only had access to Kaplan; I did purchase a baressays.com sub, but I was cautious of relying on it too much (even the higher scores) because those were student answers. The model answers from baressays seem just as convoluted as the ones from Kaplan (and often arrive at a different conclusion which is a bit confusing). I don't have a means of obtaining barbri essays, but I'll place more of an emphasis on baressays/state bar answers (although the state bar answers can be quite lengthy at times too!).


UCC vs. CL: These are just different rules based on whether there's a sale of goods. The fact that there are goods should trigger a cascade of thoughts that lead you to the right rules that make sense given that there are goods or not. Not sure if that makes sense. For example, you get a sense that CL rules shouldn't discuss quantity or battle of forms. There aren't too many UCC/CL distinctions either.

Speaking of CA civ pro, this applies to everyone: Generally, I would recommend NOT trying to predict subjects. That is a bigger gamble than you think, and you're better off just knowing the stuff. Of course, if you can loot the questions somehow, by all means please share the questions here :)

However, I don't think studying CACP in depth is a good use of your time. Yes, it is a hot potato and strange things have happened on recent bars, but there don't freak out over the few distinctions and special issues it comes with (anti-SLAPP for example).

Elms wrote:I'm finding that reading through sample essays and just extremely basic issue spotting (writing down a one sentence rule per issue, basically... or even just listing the elements of a tort I spot or something like that) is helping tremendously with memorizing the law. Then I read sample answers to see how similarly/differently the issues I found were to the sample answers.

I don't think you should do this at the expense of writing out an essay or two in full, to make sure you understand how you respond in timed conditions. But the sets of facts have really helped me contextualize the black letter law. If I do a few Wills essays, for example, then a week later I do another Wills essay, I remember, "Oh, this is similar to the facts on the XYZ essay I issue spotted last week." It has been much more effective at memorization for me than flash cards or rote memorization from an outline.

And it's definitely true that the more past essays you read, the more you start to see and recognize the same issues over and over. This really solidifies them in your mind, I think.

Well said. There are only a limited set of ways they can test you. The fact patterns are what they are--patterns. You will get a better idea of which issues and elements are tested more frequently by just doing or reading the essays.

hyc9598
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2013 1:15 pm

Postby hyc9598 » Tue Jan 27, 2015 8:27 pm

:mrgreen:
Last edited by hyc9598 on Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:28 pm, edited 3 times in total.

s1m4
Posts: 202
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:04 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby s1m4 » Wed Jan 28, 2015 1:16 am

^ Ive been using CMR for civ pro and I think its enough.

At this point I think its the Cali topics that are out to get us :/ no MBE questions to practice with :(

lawladylaw
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Nov 19, 2014 3:20 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby lawladylaw » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:35 pm

I have to say, I initially scoffed at the Kaplan suggestion of making "one sheets," but it turns out I am finding it very helpful! Might be useful for some of you who are having trouble memorizing.

melvinIII
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2014 8:55 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby melvinIII » Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:49 am

Elms wrote:I'm finding that reading through sample essays and just extremely basic issue spotting (writing down a one sentence rule per issue, basically... or even just listing the elements of a tort I spot or something like that) is helping tremendously with memorizing the law. Then I read sample answers to see how similarly/differently the issues I found were to the sample answers.

I don't think you should do this at the expense of writing out an essay or two in full, to make sure you understand how you respond in timed conditions. But the sets of facts have really helped me contextualize the black letter law. If I do a few Wills essays, for example, then a week later I do another Wills essay, I remember, "Oh, this is similar to the facts on the XYZ essay I issue spotted last week." It has been much more effective at memorization for me than flash cards or rote memorization from an outline.

And it's definitely true that the more past essays you read, the more you start to see and recognize the same issues over and over. This really solidifies them in your mind, I think.


I agree that practicing lots of essays is a tremendously useful way to learn the law. Actively learning by outlining essay answers over and over is much more effective for me than staring at an outline or listening to lectures. For the most part, I'm not doing full one-hour timed essays but so far I've gone through 25 essays from 2003-2005 trying to spot as many issues as possible and writing the best rule statements I can.

Last July I remember feeling pretty blindsided by some of the essays and just scrambling for points but I highly doubt that will happen this time because I will have at least read through every essay from 2003-2014 by the time we take the test. I remember walking out of both essay sessions in July knowing I completely made up parts of many of my rule statements and my essay scores reflected that. This time I am determined to present to the bar graders the most flawless rule statements they have ever laid their eyes on.

Also, going through the past essays in order has the added benefit of keeping you focused on the most important issues because you are naturally spending the most time on the issues that are tested most frequently.

User avatar
Elms
Posts: 180
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2008 2:06 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby Elms » Thu Jan 29, 2015 2:32 pm

Guise, I'm officially moral according to the state of California, woohoo!!! :mrgreen:

Now just the small matter of passing the bar exam...

CourtneyElizabeth
Posts: 310
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 12:22 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby CourtneyElizabeth » Thu Jan 29, 2015 5:39 pm

Someone throw a list at me of ways to challenge a will (in an essay answer ha)

User avatar
a male human
Posts: 1685
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:42 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby a male human » Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:10 pm

CourtneyElizabeth wrote:Someone throw a list at me of ways to challenge a will (in an essay answer ha)

 Do the facts say the will is valid? Mention validity of will, quick or no discussion of elements
o If not, determine testator’s testamentary capacity and testamentary intent (may be negated by
undue influence, fraud, mistake, sham will, conditional will)
o A valid will requires formalities depending on the type of will (attested/holographic)
 Is there a codicil to existing will? Valid codicil (attested/holographic) requires same formalities
 Is there a related document? Incorporation by reference, revocation by subsequent instrument
o If the 2nd document is revoked, discuss revival by republication by codicil
o Is there a related trust? Check for pour-over provision
 Did something happen to the will? Revocation by physical act, lost will
 If the will was changed or revoked improperly, was it a mistake? Dependent relative revocation
 Check if decedent has advanced a testamentary gift: ademption by satisfaction
 If property has changed, distribution of property may change as well: abatement, ademption by extinction
 If a beneficiary predeceases testator, the gift lapses or is passed to a substitute by anti-lapse statute
o If intended beneficiary dies simultaneously (w/in 120 hours), treat as if predeceased testator
 Was will executed before birth of surviving issue or marriage w/ surviving spouse? Omitted child/spouse

It's not formatted pretty; deal with it

redblueyellow
Posts: 465
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:50 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby redblueyellow » Thu Jan 29, 2015 7:39 pm

Is anyone placing extra emphasis on the CA Civ Pro portion than they would have normally considering there might be some weirdness on the test with Civ Pro being added to the MBE?

Also, a male human, thanks for your comments above to my questions. Never got a chance to address them directly, but I do appreciate it!

morescotchplease
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2015 12:46 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby morescotchplease » Fri Jan 30, 2015 12:48 am

I love studying for this bar exam!- said no one ever.

ringdabell
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2010 6:43 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby ringdabell » Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:37 am

HI. Could someone please confirm if CA has any state-specific distinctions as it relates to the MBE subjects (other than civ pro and evidence)?
Thanks!!!

s1m4
Posts: 202
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:04 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby s1m4 » Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:44 am

Anyone have a good cheat sheet for the trickier subjects in CP? (like lucas, anti-lucas, married widow presumption, etc)

thank you. :|

s1m4
Posts: 202
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:04 pm

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby s1m4 » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:35 am

I made an excel sheet where you can enter your scores from last July and see whether you would have passed or not based on their scaling info:

dl @
http://www.filedropper.com/bargrading

damn PT :((

EZ as AsDf
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:54 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby EZ as AsDf » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:35 pm

EZ back up in this Biiiz. Thanks for the support throughout these past two years taking the exam. Thanks Male Human for those sheets you posted earlier in the thread.

I will pass this time. Promise. Work hard, I'll be seeing some of you soon.

EZ as AsDf
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:54 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby EZ as AsDf » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:45 pm

I'll be reading through all the comments tonight to gather the best advice for me. For now, I wanted to ask you guys this:

How will the addition of Civil Procedure change the level of difficulty for each subject on the MBE? The number of questions is now 27 per subject (with the exception of Contracts). In a given subject will they reduce the amount of questions by topic equally, all around? Also, where do you guys find the questions to be more difficult? Is it within a specific topic or can any question be made very difficult?

EZ as AsDf
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:54 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby EZ as AsDf » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:51 pm

One more thing on MBE strategy:

I score in the lower percentage of MBE takers, the lowest or second to lowest tier. *Tear* When reading through the questions at such a high speed, I fail to understand the question at all and have to re-read, sometimes repetitively. I want to skip the long columned questions just because it is hard for me to get through all the questions. One of my fears is that this long question I skip, will end up being a very easy question.

Any advice for improving the speed at which you answer the MBE questions? How about skipping long questions to maximize time on other questions? Which questions do you guys find take the most time to sort out the details? And lastly, which questions do you find tend to be more difficult than others?

Thanks.

EZ as AsDf
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:54 am

Re: 2015 February California Bar Exam

Postby EZ as AsDf » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:57 pm

s1m4 wrote:I made an excel sheet where you can enter your scores from last July and see whether you would have passed or not based on their scaling info:

dl @
http://www.filedropper.com/bargrading

damn PT :((


Is this the general pattern for those that failed? I see that the areas where you scored low on relative to your other essays, are the same areas that I scored lower on relative to my other essay grades.




Return to “Bar Exam Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: stupidcool and 4 guests