UVA Law Students Taking Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
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5ky
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby 5ky » Tue Mar 26, 2013 12:57 am

It's worth it to take the Accounting/Corporate finance course, but I've taken almost all of the corporate classes and have yet to determine a difference between regular corporate classes and "law and business" corporate classes.

The "Law and Business" program isn't like an undergrad major, it doesn't really have any special meaning. You can do as much or as little as you'd like.

I'm happy to answer any questions about it, though, and I can answer to the best of my knowledge. I haven't taken any classes at Darden (I don't know anybody who has, other than people doing JD/MBAs). Didn't really ever seem worth pursuing.

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bgdddymtty
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby bgdddymtty » Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:11 am

danitt wrote:
North wrote:
armedwithamind wrote:Is anyone ITT pursuing the Law and Business concentration? The idea of keepingg quantitative skills fresh while in law school is very attractive + I have an interest in finance/econ. How easy is it to take electives in Darden?

Thinking about doing this too, but because I have zero business experience. You guys have any opinions or experiences?

I was just discussing this with my BFF tonight. It looks interesting but I only have a couple international trade courses and nothing else even remotely approaching business under my belt so I'm worried that it might be all too much.

So, there's really no such thing as the Law & Business concentration. The Law School offers a few straight business courses (e.g., a one-semester combo of Corporate Finance and Accounting), a few econ-related courses (it's an esoteric mix, but the last couple of years have featured Quantitative Methods, Intro to Game Theory, and Economic Analysis of Public Law, among others), and specially designated Law & Business sections of doctrinal classes like Corporations and Bankruptcy where the professors feel a little more freedom to use business terms in their lectures without significant explanation. You're not supposed to take any class where you've had significant prior training, generally defined as a college-level course in the subject. This is meant to keep ringers from wrecking the curve for everyone else. You can take electives at Darden (or anywhere else at UVa, if you can prove that the course is substantially related to your legal studies), but I don't know how common that is. While I'd guess that a lot of business-y types gravitate toward these classes, there are also quite a few people with no such background/number-phobes who take these classes in order to make themselves more marketable to firms. At the very least, I think anyone who plans on working with corporate clients should take the Accounting/Finance combo. It's hard to give corporate clients sound advice when you have literally no idea about the resources and constraints with which they operate.

DocT
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby DocT » Tue Mar 26, 2013 2:30 am

danitt wrote:
North wrote:
armedwithamind wrote:Is anyone ITT pursuing the Law and Business concentration? The idea of keepingg quantitative skills fresh while in law school is very attractive + I have an interest in finance/econ. How easy is it to take electives in Darden?

Thinking about doing this too, but because I have zero business experience. You guys have any opinions or experiences?

I was just discussing this with my BFF tonight. It looks interesting but I only have a couple international trade courses and nothing else even remotely approaching business under my belt so I'm worried that it might be all too much.


Acct and Corp Fin are great if you have little to no experience with financials and needs an introduction to relatively basic terminology and concepts. I took it before taking Corp or Tax and it has been a big help for both.

Taking classes at Darden when not a JD/MBA is not easy because Darden's schedule is very different (broken up into shorter terms - I think six a year and they meet weekly in odd combinations that don't fit nicely into a law school schedule). In addition, if you're not a JD/MBA you have to wait until Drop/Add for the term ends in order to see if the class is still open to Law students. Since some terms start in the middle of our semester, that also complicates things. Still, it has been done. And if you do have some existing background - formal or informal, it will be a little easier because you should be able to convince the prof to let you in without prereqs.

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Yardbird
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby Yardbird » Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:21 am

bgdddymtty wrote:So, there's really no such thing as the Law & Business concentration. The Law School offers a few straight business courses (e.g., a one-semester combo of Corporate Finance and Accounting), a few econ-related courses (it's an esoteric mix, but the last couple of years have featured Quantitative Methods, Intro to Game Theory, and Economic Analysis of Public Law, among others), and specially designated Law & Business sections of doctrinal classes like Corporations and Bankruptcy where the professors feel a little more freedom to use business terms in their lectures without significant explanation. You're not supposed to take any class where you've had significant prior training, generally defined as a college-level course in the subject. This is meant to keep ringers from wrecking the curve for everyone else. You can take electives at Darden (or anywhere else at UVa, if you can prove that the course is substantially related to your legal studies), but I don't know how common that is. While I'd guess that a lot of business-y types gravitate toward these classes, there are also quite a few people with no such background/number-phobes who take these classes in order to make themselves more marketable to firms. At the very least, I think anyone who plans on working with corporate clients should take the Accounting/Finance combo. It's hard to give corporate clients sound advice when you have literally no idea about the resources and constraints with which they operate.
Are you specifically barred from taking acct/finance if you have a background? I've taken both as an undergrad but I am now so far removed from the accounting class specifically that I would prefer to take it at the law school (I remember nothing from it!). Also, if you are looking into the JD/MBA I'm guessing you take them at Darden?
Last edited by Yardbird on Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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mindarmed
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby mindarmed » Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:21 am

bgdddymtty wrote:
danitt wrote:
North wrote:
armedwithamind wrote:Is anyone ITT pursuing the Law and Business concentration? The idea of keepingg quantitative skills fresh while in law school is very attractive + I have an interest in finance/econ. How easy is it to take electives in Darden?

Thinking about doing this too, but because I have zero business experience. You guys have any opinions or experiences?

I was just discussing this with my BFF tonight. It looks interesting but I only have a couple international trade courses and nothing else even remotely approaching business under my belt so I'm worried that it might be all too much.

So, there's really no such thing as the Law & Business concentration. The Law School offers a few straight business courses (e.g., a one-semester combo of Corporate Finance and Accounting), a few econ-related courses (it's an esoteric mix, but the last couple of years have featured Quantitative Methods, Intro to Game Theory, and Economic Analysis of Public Law, among others), and specially designated Law & Business sections of doctrinal classes like Corporations and Bankruptcy where the professors feel a little more freedom to use business terms in their lectures without significant explanation. You're not supposed to take any class where you've had significant prior training, generally defined as a college-level course in the subject. This is meant to keep ringers from wrecking the curve for everyone else. You can take electives at Darden (or anywhere else at UVa, if you can prove that the course is substantially related to your legal studies), but I don't know how common that is. While I'd guess that a lot of business-y types gravitate toward these classes, there are also quite a few people with no such background/number-phobes who take these classes in order to make themselves more marketable to firms. At the very least, I think anyone who plans on working with corporate clients should take the Accounting/Finance combo. It's hard to give corporate clients sound advice when you have literally no idea about the resources and constraints with which they operate.


Thanks for that - good insight. I've taken some basic econ courses in UG as well as basic accounting. No corporate finance though, so maybe I'll look at both of those as opportunities for refreshers.

eta: If I wanted to take a language class at the UG college, I'd be able to do that if it was proven to be related to my studies?

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defdef
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby defdef » Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:52 am

For those people who in the past applied for family housing, how early did the association let you know if you got a spot? Right now i'm number 2 for unfurnished 3BRM in Copeley Hill starting in August.. been that way since early January. Just wondering if that means it's relatively assured.

AssumptionRequired wrote:
defdef wrote:I was contacted by a big law alumni and I sent a reply the following day. At the time the person seemed very interested and offered to speak to me over the phone or via email. However, I didn't hear back for about a week and a half so I sent a short follow up email explaining there was no rush but I just wanted to make sure my reply didn't get lost. A week after my follow up, still no reply. Should I contact the alumni office again or should I go out on a limb and directly contact an alumni in the geographic area I'm interested in?


I would definitely not contact that alumni again. You can ask career services for a different contact, just know, they really are not going to be able to tell you anything that you dont already know from this site and other sources (at least from what I have heard about people who contacted alumni last year)


Btw, thanks for your reply. I have contacted them for another alumni. The main reason I wanted to talk with the person was due to geographical reasons that I haven't seen extensively discussed on TLS in the past (San Diego).

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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby mh013 » Tue Mar 26, 2013 12:58 pm

Regarding the school-funded rate, does it seem like people who take advantage of this program were initially interested in public interest work and had a hard time landing a PI job, or does it seem like these people struck out generally (tried for a firm job and failed)?

At ASW they said that these people end up actually getting jobs through the program, so I didn't know if these people genuinely wanted to do PI and this program was just a helpful stepping stone.

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bgdddymtty
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby bgdddymtty » Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:55 pm

mh013 wrote:Regarding the school-funded rate, does it seem like people who take advantage of this program were initially interested in public interest work and had a hard time landing a PI job, or does it seem like these people struck out generally (tried for a firm job and failed)?

At ASW they said that these people end up actually getting jobs through the program, so I didn't know if these people genuinely wanted to do PI and this program was just a helpful stepping stone.

For the Class of 2011 (and 2010, if this program existed then), there was probably a mix of both. For the Classes of 2012 and 2013, it's probably a lot more of the former. I think the typical case is that of another UVa TLSer who knew from day one that he wanted to do public service. Knowing that he had a year's worth of leeway after law school to get a full-time gig, he asked around to find out which agencies were known for hiring their unpaid help for full-time positions within a year. He recently found a state agency in his home state where a friend was hired after six months, and he will be starting there after passing the bar.

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digifly
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby digifly » Tue Mar 26, 2013 2:15 pm

bgdddymtty wrote:
mh013 wrote:Regarding the school-funded rate, does it seem like people who take advantage of this program were initially interested in public interest work and had a hard time landing a PI job, or does it seem like these people struck out generally (tried for a firm job and failed)?

At ASW they said that these people end up actually getting jobs through the program, so I didn't know if these people genuinely wanted to do PI and this program was just a helpful stepping stone.

For the Class of 2011 (and 2010, if this program existed then), there was probably a mix of both. For the Classes of 2012 and 2013, it's probably a lot more of the former. I think the typical case is that of another UVa TLSer who knew from day one that he wanted to do public service. Knowing that he had a year's worth of leeway after law school to get a full-time gig, he asked around to find out which agencies were known for hiring their unpaid help for full-time positions within a year. He recently found a state agency in his home state where a friend was hired after six months, and he will be starting there after passing the bar.


Good info, thanks!

Bree99
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby Bree99 » Tue Mar 26, 2013 4:28 pm

Has anyone here been an RA on main grounds? (resident assistant). I have some questions about the summer training and such. Thanks

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Tom Joad
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby Tom Joad » Tue Mar 26, 2013 4:40 pm

shadowofjazz wrote:
bgdddymtty wrote:So, there's really no such thing as the Law & Business concentration. The Law School offers a few straight business courses (e.g., a one-semester combo of Corporate Finance and Accounting), a few econ-related courses (it's an esoteric mix, but the last couple of years have featured Quantitative Methods, Intro to Game Theory, and Economic Analysis of Public Law, among others), and specially designated Law & Business sections of doctrinal classes like Corporations and Bankruptcy where the professors feel a little more freedom to use business terms in their lectures without significant explanation. You're not supposed to take any class where you've had significant prior training, generally defined as a college-level course in the subject. This is meant to keep ringers from wrecking the curve for everyone else. You can take electives at Darden (or anywhere else at UVa, if you can prove that the course is substantially related to your legal studies), but I don't know how common that is. While I'd guess that a lot of business-y types gravitate toward these classes, there are also quite a few people with no such background/number-phobes who take these classes in order to make themselves more marketable to firms. At the very least, I think anyone who plans on working with corporate clients should take the Accounting/Finance combo. It's hard to give corporate clients sound advice when you have literally no idea about the resources and constraints with which they operate.
Are you specifically barred from taking acct/finance if you have a background? I've taken both as an undergrad but I am now so far removed from the accounting class specifically that I would prefer to take it at the law school (I remember nothing from it!). Also, if you are looking into the JD/MBA I'm guessing you take them at Darden?

I think you would have to get the permission of the instructor before you enroll otherwise I think it is an honor code violation. I don't know if they would let you enroll or not.

albanach
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby albanach » Tue Mar 26, 2013 7:18 pm

shadowofjazz wrote:Are you specifically barred from taking acct/finance if you have a background? I've taken both as an undergrad but I am now so far removed from the accounting class specifically that I would prefer to take it at the law school (I remember nothing from it!). Also, if you are looking into the JD/MBA I'm guessing you take them at Darden?


Here's what the course page says. I think it's pretty self-explanatory, you need permission from the course instructor. I would expect your grade in the undergraduate course and the length of time since you took the course will weigh heavily on whether or not you can take it.

SIS wrote:Students who have completed one or more university level accounting courses or have practical training in accounting are not eligible to enroll in this course unless they obtain instructor permission. Similarly, students who have completed one or more university level corporate finance courses or have practical training in corporate finance are not eligible to enroll in the corporate finance course unless they obtain instructor permission. Once enrolled, students who are not eligible to enroll in either accounting or corporate finance must drop the "completed" course.


--LinkRemoved--

DocT
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby DocT » Wed Mar 27, 2013 1:21 am

albanach wrote:
shadowofjazz wrote:Are you specifically barred from taking acct/finance if you have a background? I've taken both as an undergrad but I am now so far removed from the accounting class specifically that I would prefer to take it at the law school (I remember nothing from it!). Also, if you are looking into the JD/MBA I'm guessing you take them at Darden?


Here's what the course page says. I think it's pretty self-explanatory, you need permission from the course instructor. I would expect your grade in the undergraduate course and the length of time since you took the course will weigh heavily on whether or not you can take it.

SIS wrote:Students who have completed one or more university level accounting courses or have practical training in accounting are not eligible to enroll in this course unless they obtain instructor permission. Similarly, students who have completed one or more university level corporate finance courses or have practical training in corporate finance are not eligible to enroll in the corporate finance course unless they obtain instructor permission. Once enrolled, students who are not eligible to enroll in either accounting or corporate finance must drop the "completed" course.


--LinkRemoved--


All of this is true, but SRO has admitted that they have no way to police this requirement and it seems every semester that some people are in one or both of the classes who seem like they shouldn't be. No idea whether they had instructor approval or what the criteria are to get approval. The one case I do know of someone getting instructor approval enabled them to take Corp Fin, but they had to drop Acct.

For the person who asked about language courses - setting aside informal audits (which are presumably at the instructors discretion), taking a language course on Main Grounds is going to present problems. We are not supposed to take UG courses. Don't know of anyone who has tried to get that waived for languages. Since they would complete their registration before us, there might not be any spaces available when we can register if the language is in high demand. There would also be logistical issues - getting to Main Grounds as well as the fact that many language classes meet daily - that might also make it more trouble than it's worth, even if one could get permission.

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5ky
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby 5ky » Wed Mar 27, 2013 1:59 am

DocT wrote:All of this is true, but SRO has admitted that they have no way to police this requirement and it seems every semester that some people are in one or both of the classes who seem like they shouldn't be. No idea whether they had instructor approval or what the criteria are to get approval. The one case I do know of someone getting instructor approval enabled them to take Corp Fin, but they had to drop Acct.


I've heard people say this a number of times, but I really don't think there's some endemic of ringers taking accounting or corporate finance when they know they'd be expelled if found out.

Particularly with Corporate Finance, I think anybody with any sort of Math/Econ background would find that course somewhat intuitive, perhaps making it appear they had more knowledge of the actual subject than they actually did. Even if there's no actual overlap in the material, the style of thinking required is similar and structurally the course is very similar as well -- and much different than most law school courses.

scc1986
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby scc1986 » Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:13 am

Prospective 0L here. What percent of the class enters UVA wanting a DC firm job? Would you say the DC placement of UVA is one of the best in the country? I want a firm job there and am deciding between Virginia, Duke, and Georgetown.

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Yardbird
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby Yardbird » Wed Mar 27, 2013 9:23 am

5ky wrote:
DocT wrote:All of this is true, but SRO has admitted that they have no way to police this requirement and it seems every semester that some people are in one or both of the classes who seem like they shouldn't be. No idea whether they had instructor approval or what the criteria are to get approval. The one case I do know of someone getting instructor approval enabled them to take Corp Fin, but they had to drop Acct.


I've heard people say this a number of times, but I really don't think there's some endemic of ringers taking accounting or corporate finance when they know they'd be expelled if found out.

Particularly with Corporate Finance, I think anybody with any sort of Math/Econ background would find that course somewhat intuitive, perhaps making it appear they had more knowledge of the actual subject than they actually did. Even if there's no actual overlap in the material, the style of thinking required is similar and structurally the course is very similar as well -- and much different than most law school courses.
I'll probably play it safe and ask for permission. I anticipate not being able to take corporate finance since I did well in it just last semester in undergrad, but accounting was a while ago and is up in the air as to whether they would let me take it at UVA (I did meh in it here and remember nothing of it).

All this being said, is there a big difference between the regular sections and the law and business sections of classes? Is it in general easier/harder to do better or is there no difference other than going more in depth into the material?

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mindarmed
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby mindarmed » Wed Mar 27, 2013 10:12 am

shadowofjazz wrote:
5ky wrote:
DocT wrote:All of this is true, but SRO has admitted that they have no way to police this requirement and it seems every semester that some people are in one or both of the classes who seem like they shouldn't be. No idea whether they had instructor approval or what the criteria are to get approval. The one case I do know of someone getting instructor approval enabled them to take Corp Fin, but they had to drop Acct.


I've heard people say this a number of times, but I really don't think there's some endemic of ringers taking accounting or corporate finance when they know they'd be expelled if found out.

Particularly with Corporate Finance, I think anybody with any sort of Math/Econ background would find that course somewhat intuitive, perhaps making it appear they had more knowledge of the actual subject than they actually did. Even if there's no actual overlap in the material, the style of thinking required is similar and structurally the course is very similar as well -- and much different than most law school courses.
I'll probably play it safe and ask for permission. I anticipate not being able to take corporate finance since I did well in it just last semester in undergrad, but accounting was a while ago and is up in the air as to whether they would let me take it at UVA (I did meh in it here and remember nothing of it).

All this being said, is there a big difference between the regular sections and the law and business sections of classes? Is it in general easier/harder to do better or is there no difference other than going more in depth into the material?


Piggybacking off this, so the law and business sections of classes do not include math or econ and are essentially the same as non law and business sections?

envisciguy
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby envisciguy » Wed Mar 27, 2013 1:18 pm

scc1986 wrote:Prospective 0L here. What percent of the class enters UVA wanting a DC firm job? Would you say the DC placement of UVA is one of the best in the country? I want a firm job there and am deciding between Virginia, Duke, and Georgetown.


Employment is better in general for UVA than Georgetown and I believe it places better in DC than Duke does. Someone who's already been through the hiring process might know more though.

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pjo
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby pjo » Wed Mar 27, 2013 1:23 pm

armedwithamind wrote:
shadowofjazz wrote:
5ky wrote:
DocT wrote:All of this is true, but SRO has admitted that they have no way to police this requirement and it seems every semester that some people are in one or both of the classes who seem like they shouldn't be. No idea whether they had instructor approval or what the criteria are to get approval. The one case I do know of someone getting instructor approval enabled them to take Corp Fin, but they had to drop Acct.


I've heard people say this a number of times, but I really don't think there's some endemic of ringers taking accounting or corporate finance when they know they'd be expelled if found out.

Particularly with Corporate Finance, I think anybody with any sort of Math/Econ background would find that course somewhat intuitive, perhaps making it appear they had more knowledge of the actual subject than they actually did. Even if there's no actual overlap in the material, the style of thinking required is similar and structurally the course is very similar as well -- and much different than most law school courses.
I'll probably play it safe and ask for permission. I anticipate not being able to take corporate finance since I did well in it just last semester in undergrad, but accounting was a while ago and is up in the air as to whether they would let me take it at UVA (I did meh in it here and remember nothing of it).

All this being said, is there a big difference between the regular sections and the law and business sections of classes? Is it in general easier/harder to do better or is there no difference other than going more in depth into the material?


Piggybacking off this, so the law and business sections of classes do not include math or econ and are essentially the same as non law and business sections?


I actually think it depends a lot on what professor is teaching the law and business section. Hines used to each Econ at W&M, so he still loves to incorporate econ stuff into lectures when possible. I've never taken a law and business tailored class with him, but he has stated in other classes that he would go into more detail regarding the econ/math aspects of a certain concept we were studying if it were a law and business designated class. On the flip-side, I've taken a law and business class with Walt (strictly because it fit into my schedule well, not because it was labeled L&B) and there was no extra math stuff, but then again, Walt's background is in Philosophy. Then you have Morley, who will go into math/calculus/spread sheets whether or not it's an L&B class, because that's how he rolls.

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5ky
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby 5ky » Wed Mar 27, 2013 2:03 pm

I haven't noticed any difference in material between regular corporate classes and their "law and business" counterparts, including Hynes.

Part of it is just that accounting/corp finance aren't really super relevant to secured transactions, bankruptcy, corporations, etc. there's not a ton of overlap in material there, so it's hard for professors to incorporate it without deviating from teaching the material of the actual class.

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mindarmed
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby mindarmed » Wed Mar 27, 2013 5:41 pm

5ky wrote:I haven't noticed any difference in material between regular corporate classes and their "law and business" counterparts, including Hynes.

Part of it is just that accounting/corp finance aren't really super relevant to secured transactions, bankruptcy, corporations, etc. there's not a ton of overlap in material there, so it's hard for professors to incorporate it without deviating from teaching the material of the actual class.


thanks brother. you've been immensely helpful in this process

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North
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby North » Thu Mar 28, 2013 9:55 am

I don't know too much about how clerkships work yet, but the Supreme Alums reception got me thinking. Everyone there had clerked for pretty conservative judges. Does UVA funnel its grads well only to clerkships with conservative and not liberal judges? If I'm relatively interested in clerking (assuming it's an option grade-wise), will I be at a disadvantage if I'm a dirty libruhl? Or do the political distinctions I have in my 0L head not really apply to clerkship hiring?

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Tim0thy222
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby Tim0thy222 » Thu Mar 28, 2013 11:46 am

North wrote:I don't know too much about how clerkships work yet, but the Supreme Alums reception got me thinking. Everyone there had clerked for pretty conservative judges. Does UVA funnel its grads well only to clerkships with conservative and not liberal judges? If I'm relatively interested in clerking (assuming it's an option grade-wise), will I be at a disadvantage if I'm a dirty libruhl? Or do the political distinctions I have in my 0L head not really apply to clerkship hiring?


The woman at the clerkship employment panel was asked this. She said that the most liberal and most conservative judges care, but like the middle 80% don't.

Also, I talked to a guy who clerked for a really conservative judge, and he got by volunteering for all the cases that wouldn't be too controversial.

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bgdddymtty
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby bgdddymtty » Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:10 pm

North wrote:I don't know too much about how clerkships work yet, but the Supreme Alums reception got me thinking. Everyone there had clerked for pretty conservative judges. Does UVA funnel its grads well only to clerkships with conservative and not liberal judges? If I'm relatively interested in clerking (assuming it's an option grade-wise), will I be at a disadvantage if I'm a dirty libruhl? Or do the political distinctions I have in my 0L head not really apply to clerkship hiring?

I think it matters more the higher up the food chain you go. If you clerk for a federal appeals court or on the Supreme Court, you're very likely to clerk for someone with whom you are ideologically well-aligned. Virginia has a reputation as being more conservative than other T14's (Chicago and Northwestern being the only possible exceptions), but given that both the law and academia are fields dominated by liberals, it's still, on balance, left of the American political center.

For curiosity's sake, I looked up with whom we have placed Supreme Court clerks in the last ten years. Here's the list:
Cons:
Alito - 2
Rehnquist - 2
Roberts - 5
Scalia - 4

Libs:
Breyer - 0
Ginsberg - 1
Kagan - 0 (HYS only, to this point)
Sotomayor - 1
Souter - 2
Stevens - 1

Centrists:
Kennedy - 2
O'Connor - 0

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North
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Re: UVA Law Students Taking Questions

Postby North » Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:36 pm

bgdddymtty wrote:
North wrote:I don't know too much about how clerkships work yet, but the Supreme Alums reception got me thinking. Everyone there had clerked for pretty conservative judges. Does UVA funnel its grads well only to clerkships with conservative and not liberal judges? If I'm relatively interested in clerking (assuming it's an option grade-wise), will I be at a disadvantage if I'm a dirty libruhl? Or do the political distinctions I have in my 0L head not really apply to clerkship hiring?

I think it matters more the higher up the food chain you go. If you clerk for a federal appeals court or on the Supreme Court, you're very likely to clerk for someone with whom you are ideologically well-aligned. Virginia has a reputation as being more conservative than other T14's (Chicago and Northwestern being the only possible exceptions), but given that both the law and academia are fields dominated by liberals, it's still, on balance, left of the American political center.

For curiosity's sake, I looked up with whom we have placed Supreme Court clerks in the last ten years. Here's the list:
Cons:
Alito - 2
Rehnquist - 2
Roberts - 5
Scalia - 4

Libs:
Breyer - 0
Ginsberg - 1
Kagan - 0 (HYS only, to this point)
Sotomayor - 1
Souter - 2
Stevens - 1

Centrists:
Kennedy - 2
O'Connor - 0

TYFT, this is great information. Looks like you're right, so I guess it's good that I have about a 0% chance of SCOTUS clerking. Roberts seems to like us, though, and that's pretty cool. Maybe I could learn to be a con while I'm up there.

Thanks again.




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