Cornell 1L taking questions

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cantexplaingottago
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby cantexplaingottago » Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:32 pm

freekick wrote:How important is getting Understanding Criminal Law by Dressler (the optional book) for Garvey? Should get it or wait to see?


Crim is hands down the easiest, most straightforward law class you will ever have. Supplements are unnecessary.

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freekick
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby freekick » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:09 pm

cantexplaingottago wrote:
freekick wrote:How important is getting Understanding Criminal Law by Dressler (the optional book) for Garvey? Should get it or wait to see?


Crim is hands down the easiest, most straightforward law class you will ever have. Supplements are unnecessary.


Thanks! Some respite for the purse.

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chargers21
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby chargers21 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:39 pm

Any thoughts on:

Contracts - Rachlinski
Constitutional - Dorf
Criminal - Margulies
Civ Pro - Clermont
Lawyering - Freed

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Lavitz
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby Lavitz » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:51 pm

chargers21 wrote:Any thoughts on:

Contracts - Rachlinski
Constitutional - Dorf
Criminal - Margulies
Civ Pro - Clermont
Lawyering - Freed

Only prof I had here in 1L was Clermont. I enjoyed the class, but the subject matter can be difficult to wrap your head around, and it doesn't help that Clermont's pretty eccentric. Our exam essay was literally just an article from Above The Law with the question "what would you do if you were the attorney in this article?" Because the exam is open book but you can only bring in the casebook, rules book, and his black letter outline, I'd advise taking as many notes in the books as possible. This includes the correct answers to the iclicker questions he asks during class and the answers to any of the questions that appear scattered throughout the casebook. You should also tab everything, because the multiple choice part of the exam is essentially a treasure hunt. I think the only supplement I used was Siegel's multiple choice questions, and I read his black letter outline multiple times. I also know people who loved the E&E as well as Freer's CivPro treatise. And, for the first day of class, just know that Sibbach has a dilemma.

I love Dorf and took 3 classes with him, but I didn't have him for ConLaw. All I can say is that, as a 1L, I imagine you'll feel intimidated by both Dorf and the subject matter, but don't worry because nobody else knows what's going on either.

And I hear Rachlinski is fun.

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chargers21
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby chargers21 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:07 pm

Lavitz wrote:
chargers21 wrote:Any thoughts on:

Contracts - Rachlinski
Constitutional - Dorf
Criminal - Margulies
Civ Pro - Clermont
Lawyering - Freed

Only prof I had here in 1L was Clermont. I enjoyed the class, but the subject matter can be difficult to wrap your head around, and it doesn't help that Clermont's pretty eccentric. Our exam essay was literally just an article from Above The Law with the question "what would you do if you were the attorney in this article?" Because the exam is open book but you can only bring in the casebook, rules book, and his black letter outline, I'd advise taking as many notes in the books as possible. This includes the correct answers to the iclicker questions he asks during class and the answers to any of the questions that appear scattered throughout the casebook. You should also tab everything, because the multiple choice part of the exam is essentially a treasure hunt. I think the only supplement I used was Siegel's multiple choice questions, and I read his black letter outline multiple times. I also know people who loved the E&E as well as Freer's CivPro treatise. And, for the first day of class, just know that Sibbach has a dilemma.

I love Dorf and took 3 classes with him, but I didn't have him for ConLaw. All I can say is that, as a 1L, I imagine you'll feel intimidated by both Dorf and the subject matter, but don't worry because nobody else knows what's going on either.

And I hear Rachlinski is fun.

Thanks for the tips! From my casual searches, it seems like I definitely got some very intelligent professors and most certainly not the worst ones possible. Would you recommend the multiple choice guide that you used in Clermont?

Constitutional law is what intially got me interested in law school, and in spite of not planning to do anything down that path anymore, I'm hoping that at least my naive interest in the subject will help with the fact that it'll be completely over my head. I heard Dorf is an absolute genius.

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Lavitz
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby Lavitz » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:47 pm

chargers21 wrote:
Lavitz wrote:
chargers21 wrote:Any thoughts on:

Contracts - Rachlinski
Constitutional - Dorf
Criminal - Margulies
Civ Pro - Clermont
Lawyering - Freed

Only prof I had here in 1L was Clermont. I enjoyed the class, but the subject matter can be difficult to wrap your head around, and it doesn't help that Clermont's pretty eccentric. Our exam essay was literally just an article from Above The Law with the question "what would you do if you were the attorney in this article?" Because the exam is open book but you can only bring in the casebook, rules book, and his black letter outline, I'd advise taking as many notes in the books as possible. This includes the correct answers to the iclicker questions he asks during class and the answers to any of the questions that appear scattered throughout the casebook. You should also tab everything, because the multiple choice part of the exam is essentially a treasure hunt. I think the only supplement I used was Siegel's multiple choice questions, and I read his black letter outline multiple times. I also know people who loved the E&E as well as Freer's CivPro treatise. And, for the first day of class, just know that Sibbach has a dilemma.

I love Dorf and took 3 classes with him, but I didn't have him for ConLaw. All I can say is that, as a 1L, I imagine you'll feel intimidated by both Dorf and the subject matter, but don't worry because nobody else knows what's going on either.

And I hear Rachlinski is fun.

Thanks for the tips! From my casual searches, it seems like I definitely got some very intelligent professors and most certainly not the worst ones possible. Would you recommend the multiple choice guide that you used in Clermont?

Constitutional law is what intially got me interested in law school, and in spite of not planning to do anything down that path anymore, I'm hoping that at least my naive interest in the subject will help with the fact that it'll be completely over my head. I heard Dorf is an absolute genius.

It depends. Different things work for different people, and there are a lot of potential supplements for CivPro, so it's hard to recommend specific ones. I had Clermont in the Spring, so I already knew I wasn't terrible at CivPro before deciding only to use Siegel's and the BLO. And since I only used Siegel's right before finals, I'd definitely hold off and wait to see how you feel about the subject before getting it or anything else. If you decide you need something to use during the semester to clear up any areas of confusion, either the E&E or Freer would be a good choice. If you prefer interacting with the material by writing out answers to example short questions, then maybe grab the E&E. If you don't think that's necessary for you to learn, I'd grab Freer (or something else). There's no need to buy a ton of supplements to have ready on day one. It won't matter in the grand scheme of things if you're unclear about some things at the beginning of the semester. You'll have to go over everything again before finals anyway.

Yes, Dorf is an absolute genius, and he's also great at basketball and pie-eating contests.

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cantexplaingottago
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby cantexplaingottago » Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:50 pm

Lavitz wrote:And I hear Rachlinski is fun.


Had him for Civ Pro 1 and can confirm, he's a madman. His energy reminds me of Robin Williams. Can't speak to how accessible Contracts will be with him, but you'll certainly get some great quotes from it.

eshnunna
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Re: Cornell 1L taking questions

Postby eshnunna » Thu Aug 17, 2017 11:10 am

Rachlinski does short answer exams. He also gives you a ton of past exam questions and their answers so you can just practice those.

He's engaging but can get off track pretty easily.




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