Patent lawyer with a masters in science?

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
dwighthoward786
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:24 am

Patent lawyer with a masters in science?

Postby dwighthoward786 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:57 pm

Can't seem to find much information on this but, if i have a bachelors in sociology and a masters in biomedical sciences. Is it possible to become a patent attorney?

User avatar
UVA2B
Posts: 2639
Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 10:48 pm

Re: Patent lawyer with a masters in science?

Postby UVA2B » Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:48 pm

The degree itself won't make you eligible for the patent bar, but the underlying course work you've done might get you there (if you're looking to do patent prosecution. If you want litigation or tech transactions, you won't technically need the patent bar, although it's generally preferred to do any sort of patent practice). You would have to qualify as a Category B eligible applicant. The relevant part of the USPTO guideline states:

B. CATEGORY B: Bachelor's Degree in Another Subject. An applicant with a Bachelor's degree in a subject other than one of those listed in Category A, must establish to the satisfaction of the OED Director that he or she possesses scientific and technical training equivalent to that received at an accredited U.S. college or university for a Bachelor's degree in one of the subjects listed in Category A. To establish such equivalence to the satisfaction of the OED Director, an applicant can satisfy one of the following four options, other training, or other education listed below. The applicant must submit the necessary documentation and objective evidence showing satisfaction of one of the options or other means of qualifying.
i. Option 1: 24 semester hours in physics. Only physics courses for physics majors will be accepted.
ii. Option 2: 32 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and 24 semester hours in biology, botany, microbiology, or molecular biology.
The 8 semester hours in chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential courses, each course including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted.
iii. Option 3: 30 semester hours in chemistry. Only chemistry courses for chemistry majors will be accepted.
iv. Option 4: 40 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
32 semester hours of chemistry, physics, biology, botany, microbiology, molecular biology, or engineering. (For Computer Science, see other acceptable course work.)
The 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential courses, each course including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted. For Computer Science, see other "Other Acceptable Course Work."
All acceptable coursework for Options 2 and 4 must be for science or engineering majors.




Return to “Ask a Law Student / Graduate”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: greenjuicecleanse, LSstudent, Zero Hedge and 7 guests