Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

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Veil of Ignorance
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Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby Veil of Ignorance » Thu May 11, 2017 7:02 pm

This might be a silly question, I know that. I'm just wondering if any of you think that the format of the "digital law firm" has much potential for the future, or if working remotely will become more possible. My dream would be to build up a little pot of gold in biglaw then start working remotely from some place like Barcelona, if only doing so was possible. Will technology make make this possible someday?

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LAWYER2
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby LAWYER2 » Mon May 15, 2017 2:27 pm

This is my ultimate goal. I'd really like to leave the US for extended period of times and still make money. Once I establish a reputation and client base I'm going for it. They type of law I want to practice, technology/transactional law, I think there is a future in it.

JusticeChuckleNutz
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby JusticeChuckleNutz » Mon May 15, 2017 4:11 pm

Please god let us hope so.

albanach
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby albanach » Wed May 17, 2017 3:30 pm

LAWYER2 wrote:This is my ultimate goal. I'd really like to leave the US for extended period of times and still make money. Once I establish a reputation and client base I'm going for it. They type of law I want to practice, technology/transactional law, I think there is a future in it.


Unless you have the benefit of dual citizenship, there's likely to be immigration hassles alongside the joys of the US worldwide income taxation policy and maybe dual tax to deal with. Also, foreign banks will be a pain to deal with because they often don't want the regulatory pain that comes with offering services to US citizens.

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LAWYER2
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby LAWYER2 » Thu May 18, 2017 4:45 pm

albanach wrote:
LAWYER2 wrote:This is my ultimate goal. I'd really like to leave the US for extended period of times and still make money. Once I establish a reputation and client base I'm going for it. They type of law I want to practice, technology/transactional law, I think there is a future in it.


Unless you have the benefit of dual citizenship, there's likely to be immigration hassles alongside the joys of the US worldwide income taxation policy and maybe dual tax to deal with. Also, foreign banks will be a pain to deal with because they often don't want the regulatory pain that comes with offering services to US citizens.


I'm not entirely sure how this would be an issue if you're on an guest visa. From what I looked up re: Thailand, a multiple-entry visa is valid for 6 months. However, if you leave Thailand and re-enter before it's been 6 months since your initial arrival, you get a stamp for another 60 days, which give you 8 months total.
That's all I'm looking to do, leave for six months at a time and manage all my finances via the internet. Unless some major global crisis breaks out it shouldbn't be a problem.

Npret
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby Npret » Thu May 18, 2017 5:10 pm

LAWYER2 wrote:
albanach wrote:
LAWYER2 wrote:This is my ultimate goal. I'd really like to leave the US for extended period of times and still make money. Once I establish a reputation and client base I'm going for it. They type of law I want to practice, technology/transactional law, I think there is a future in it.


Unless you have the benefit of dual citizenship, there's likely to be immigration hassles alongside the joys of the US worldwide income taxation policy and maybe dual tax to deal with. Also, foreign banks will be a pain to deal with because they often don't want the regulatory pain that comes with offering services to US citizens.


I'm not entirely sure how this would be an issue if you're on an guest visa. From what I looked up re: Thailand, a multiple-entry visa is valid for 6 months. However, if you leave Thailand and re-enter before it's been 6 months since your initial arrival, you get a stamp for another 60 days, which give you 8 months total.
That's all I'm looking to do, leave for six months at a time and manage all my finances via the internet. Unless some major global crisis breaks out it shouldbn't be a problem.

My sister has a house in Guatemala and manages to keep track of her life online when she's there. They don't have the best internet but it works.She has to leave periodically to show she still has no immigrant intent but it's not that often.
She's an anthropologist and an artist though so she isn't trying to maintain a law practice or make a lot of money. She lives on a relatively tiny amount of money a year. She may be just above the US poverty line but she's not concerned with money.
So in theory your plan is doable though I don't know how it would work practically in law.

albanach
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby albanach » Thu May 18, 2017 5:37 pm

LAWYER2 wrote:I'm not entirely sure how this would be an issue if you're on an guest visa.


The terms of most guest visas prohibit working - even if it's teleworking to a location outside the country.

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LAWYER2
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Re: Future of digital law firms/ working remotely?

Postby LAWYER2 » Thu May 18, 2017 5:54 pm

albanach wrote:
LAWYER2 wrote:I'm not entirely sure how this would be an issue if you're on an guest visa.


The terms of most guest visas prohibit working - even if it's teleworking to a location outside the country.



True. I guess one would definitely have to do their homework first. From a cursory look, distinctions can be made for working for an "employer." What if you're working for yourself? Interesting.




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