Yale 1L taking questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
Gabriel_is_Satan
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby Gabriel_is_Satan » Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:38 am

KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:If I am looking for housing in New Haven, what part of downtown New Haven is generally the safer area?


Downtown New Haven is pretty safe in general, as there is a large police presence, many lights, and constant foot-traffic. I think the New Haven stigma is really overblown. I think it's more that many students go to college at Yale from extremely wealthy backgrounds and were largely insulated from the world. Then they get to New Haven, and for the first time in their life, see poverty, and are terrified. Now, I would not recommend living very south of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, or much further west than Dwight Street. But I would say other than that, New Haven is pretty safe. Even the hill is safe during the day. We get told of crimes, and they invariably involve students (not law students to my knowledge) walking alone at like 3 am in rougher areas.

But a lot of students live in the Novella, 360 State, and The Taft and all are happy with their choices. East Rock is a bit of a further walk, but a lot of people live there as well and like it (and most professors live in that area). I would not live in the Towers, as some students in my class have had some serious issues there.


This is all 100% correct. There are admittedly one or two good reasons to prefer HLS over YLS. New Haven being too unsafe is certainly not one of them.

Just apply Obama's foreign policy mantra ("don't do stupid shit"), and you'll be fine. One caveat is your car: never ever leave anything of value in it. Same applies to anything on your porch that isn't bolted down. But aside from these property crimes, you actually need to seek out trouble, or be really unlucky, for anything to happen to you. Yale has a night shuttle that drives you home btw.

NB: I prefer east rock over downtown, but that's just a personal preferences.

20170322
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby 20170322 » Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:34 am

Currently deciding between Yale and full ride to lower t14 that I really like. Any input? Goals are biglaw and eventually government.

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:08 am

Gabriel_is_Satan wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:If I am looking for housing in New Haven, what part of downtown New Haven is generally the safer area?


Downtown New Haven is pretty safe in general, as there is a large police presence, many lights, and constant foot-traffic. I think the New Haven stigma is really overblown. I think it's more that many students go to college at Yale from extremely wealthy backgrounds and were largely insulated from the world. Then they get to New Haven, and for the first time in their life, see poverty, and are terrified. Now, I would not recommend living very south of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, or much further west than Dwight Street. But I would say other than that, New Haven is pretty safe. Even the hill is safe during the day. We get told of crimes, and they invariably involve students (not law students to my knowledge) walking alone at like 3 am in rougher areas.

But a lot of students live in the Novella, 360 State, and The Taft and all are happy with their choices. East Rock is a bit of a further walk, but a lot of people live there as well and like it (and most professors live in that area). I would not live in the Towers, as some students in my class have had some serious issues there.


This is all 100% correct. There are admittedly one or two good reasons to prefer HLS over YLS. New Haven being too unsafe is certainly not one of them.

Just apply Obama's foreign policy mantra ("don't do stupid shit"), and you'll be fine. One caveat is your car: never ever leave anything of value in it. Same applies to anything on your porch that isn't bolted down. But aside from these property crimes, you actually need to seek out trouble, or be really unlucky, for anything to happen to you. Yale has a night shuttle that drives you home btw.

NB: I prefer east rock over downtown, but that's just a personal preferences.


Yes, I haven't heard of any sort of violent crime against a law student, and I'm not aware of any Yale student being hurt in a crime since Annie Le, and that was obviously a very different sort of thing than a mugging. I walk home through the green, which law revue makes fun of yearly, often at dusk, and have never felt unsafe. And as Gabriel_is_Satan said, being smart about property really cuts down on the chance of those crimes, though you can just be unlucky (but of course, you can be unlucky and have your car broken into anywhere). And I've never taken the shuttle, but that's a really good point Gabriel raised. Past a certain time (maybe 5ish? it gets dark early in New England in the winter), there is a shuttle that waits outside the front door of the building, leaving every 15 minutes and taking students to their front door. I want to say at :00 and :30 of every hour, it goes to the downtown areas, and at :15 and :30, it goes to east rock, but I could have that backwards since I've always just walked.

I would pushback a little against a blanket preference for east rock. If you have a family (one YLS poster here does), then East Rock makes perfect sense and is better, as it's more suburban and quiet and your kids can have a yard and ride their bikes. But if you're childless (especially if you're single), I'd highly recommend a downtown apartment. A lot of East Rock students get really frustrated because it's a bit of a walk from the school and downtown. It's not as easy to participate in a ton of the outside social events (since East Rock is so quiet, there's typically only one bar review done near East Rock a year, the rest are a 30 minute+ walk away). There's a lot to be said for being near all the action at the school, and all the bars and restaurants.

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:43 am

SweetTort wrote:Currently deciding between Yale and full ride to lower t14 that I really like. Any input? Goals are biglaw and eventually government.


It's definitely a tough decision. As you can see from my profile, I had to make a very similar decision since I had some full-rides vs admission to YLS (I was STRONGLY considering Columbia). I'd guess almost all students here made a decision re: YLS vs some full ride. If you think you're going to be receiving need-based aid, then I would wait for that and do some serious calculation of prices. Some students receive substantial financial aid packages from YLS, that end up being comparable in total cost of attendance to many of the T14 full-rides. If not, then it's tougher, and I think it largely depends on your individual circumstances. If you definitely want to work in California for the rest of your career, then a full-ride at Berkeley is interesting. Similarly, If you want to work in Atlanta biglaw and then government in the South, then I think a Mordecai could be worth exploring. And of course, if you want just biglaw in NYC or Chicago, then Hamiltons or Rubies are really fantastic (but I'm guessing that you're not talking about those).

In most situations though, students aren't 100% on their goals or where they want to work. In that case, I always think YLS wins, because it gives flexibility in that it excels at everything employment related. You really want a clerkship of any kind? You can get one, even a COA one, though of course the 2nd, 9th, and DC, and a couple other feeders are foreclosed to you without good grades/professor recommendations. You want to go to biglaw but you have all P's, maybe an LP too? You can still land a V10 if you want that, and only Wachtell is really closed to you if you're a decent interviewer. And anyone who really wants government honors or public interest seems to do just fine. Even academia has a really high success rate for those gunning for that, since graduation requires 2 substantial writing assignments done under a professor's supervision (and you can just let the professor know that you want to make them publishable), so YLS students can come out of here with a YLS diploma, 2 published pieces, and several recommendations from the very best in the field, giving a huge leg-up in the job hunt. You can also go work for a start-up, or consulting, or on capital hill as a policy analyst. Or even go to the circus and become a clown and take advantage of COAP. You're buying a huge amount of flexibility at YLS, which 85% of admits here think is worth it.

So it's not a clear answer that depends on your individual goals. You're in a great position that I would say is no-lose. You're going to be successful wherever you choose. If you want to discuss it more in depth and get into yours and my specifics, then I'm happy to help, just PM me.

20170322
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby 20170322 » Sat Feb 25, 2017 1:48 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Currently deciding between Yale and full ride to lower t14 that I really like. Any input? Goals are biglaw and eventually government.


It's definitely a tough decision. As you can see from my profile, I had to make a very similar decision since I had some full-rides vs admission to YLS (I was STRONGLY considering Columbia). I'd guess almost all students here made a decision re: YLS vs some full ride. If you think you're going to be receiving need-based aid, then I would wait for that and do some serious calculation of prices. Some students receive substantial financial aid packages from YLS, that end up being comparable in total cost of attendance to many of the T14 full-rides. If not, then it's tougher, and I think it largely depends on your individual circumstances. If you definitely want to work in California for the rest of your career, then a full-ride at Berkeley is interesting. Similarly, If you want to work in Atlanta biglaw and then government in the South, then I think a Mordecai could be worth exploring. And of course, if you want just biglaw in NYC or Chicago, then Hamiltons or Rubies are really fantastic (but I'm guessing that you're not talking about those).

In most situations though, students aren't 100% on their goals or where they want to work. In that case, I always think YLS wins, because it gives flexibility in that it excels at everything employment related. You really want a clerkship of any kind? You can get one, even a COA one, though of course the 2nd, 9th, and DC, and a couple other feeders are foreclosed to you without good grades/professor recommendations. You want to go to biglaw but you have all P's, maybe an LP too? You can still land a V10 if you want that, and only Wachtell is really closed to you if you're a decent interviewer. And anyone who really wants government honors or public interest seems to do just fine. Even academia has a really high success rate for those gunning for that, since graduation requires 2 substantial writing assignments done under a professor's supervision (and you can just let the professor know that you want to make them publishable), so YLS students can come out of here with a YLS diploma, 2 published pieces, and several recommendations from the very best in the field, giving a huge leg-up in the job hunt. You can also go work for a start-up, or consulting, or on capital hill as a policy analyst. Or even go to the circus and become a clown and take advantage of COAP. You're buying a huge amount of flexibility at YLS, which 85% of admits here think is worth it.

So it's not a clear answer that depends on your individual goals. You're in a great position that I would say is no-lose. You're going to be successful wherever you choose. If you want to discuss it more in depth and get into yours and my specifics, then I'm happy to help, just PM me.


Bolded is pretty much my situation, but sub Mordecai with Dillard.

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 2:22 pm

SweetTort wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Currently deciding between Yale and full ride to lower t14 that I really like. Any input? Goals are biglaw and eventually government.


It's definitely a tough decision. As you can see from my profile, I had to make a very similar decision since I had some full-rides vs admission to YLS (I was STRONGLY considering Columbia). I'd guess almost all students here made a decision re: YLS vs some full ride. If you think you're going to be receiving need-based aid, then I would wait for that and do some serious calculation of prices. Some students receive substantial financial aid packages from YLS, that end up being comparable in total cost of attendance to many of the T14 full-rides. If not, then it's tougher, and I think it largely depends on your individual circumstances. If you definitely want to work in California for the rest of your career, then a full-ride at Berkeley is interesting. Similarly, If you want to work in Atlanta biglaw and then government in the South, then I think a Mordecai could be worth exploring. And of course, if you want just biglaw in NYC or Chicago, then Hamiltons or Rubies are really fantastic (but I'm guessing that you're not talking about those).

In most situations though, students aren't 100% on their goals or where they want to work. In that case, I always think YLS wins, because it gives flexibility in that it excels at everything employment related. You really want a clerkship of any kind? You can get one, even a COA one, though of course the 2nd, 9th, and DC, and a couple other feeders are foreclosed to you without good grades/professor recommendations. You want to go to biglaw but you have all P's, maybe an LP too? You can still land a V10 if you want that, and only Wachtell is really closed to you if you're a decent interviewer. And anyone who really wants government honors or public interest seems to do just fine. Even academia has a really high success rate for those gunning for that, since graduation requires 2 substantial writing assignments done under a professor's supervision (and you can just let the professor know that you want to make them publishable), so YLS students can come out of here with a YLS diploma, 2 published pieces, and several recommendations from the very best in the field, giving a huge leg-up in the job hunt. You can also go work for a start-up, or consulting, or on capital hill as a policy analyst. Or even go to the circus and become a clown and take advantage of COAP. You're buying a huge amount of flexibility at YLS, which 85% of admits here think is worth it.

So it's not a clear answer that depends on your individual goals. You're in a great position that I would say is no-lose. You're going to be successful wherever you choose. If you want to discuss it more in depth and get into yours and my specifics, then I'm happy to help, just PM me.


Bolded is pretty much my situation, but sub Mordecai with Dillard.


PM me.

pandaaa
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby pandaaa » Sat Feb 25, 2017 3:22 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:
Gabriel_is_Satan wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:If I am looking for housing in New Haven, what part of downtown New Haven is generally the safer area?


Downtown New Haven is pretty safe in general, as there is a large police presence, many lights, and constant foot-traffic. I think the New Haven stigma is really overblown. I think it's more that many students go to college at Yale from extremely wealthy backgrounds and were largely insulated from the world. Then they get to New Haven, and for the first time in their life, see poverty, and are terrified. Now, I would not recommend living very south of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, or much further west than Dwight Street. But I would say other than that, New Haven is pretty safe. Even the hill is safe during the day. We get told of crimes, and they invariably involve students (not law students to my knowledge) walking alone at like 3 am in rougher areas.

But a lot of students live in the Novella, 360 State, and The Taft and all are happy with their choices. East Rock is a bit of a further walk, but a lot of people live there as well and like it (and most professors live in that area). I would not live in the Towers, as some students in my class have had some serious issues there.


This is all 100% correct. There are admittedly one or two good reasons to prefer HLS over YLS. New Haven being too unsafe is certainly not one of them.

Just apply Obama's foreign policy mantra ("don't do stupid shit"), and you'll be fine. One caveat is your car: never ever leave anything of value in it. Same applies to anything on your porch that isn't bolted down. But aside from these property crimes, you actually need to seek out trouble, or be really unlucky, for anything to happen to you. Yale has a night shuttle that drives you home btw.

NB: I prefer east rock over downtown, but that's just a personal preferences.


Yes, I haven't heard of any sort of violent crime against a law student, and I'm not aware of any Yale student being hurt in a crime since Annie Le, and that was obviously a very different sort of thing than a mugging. I walk home through the green, which law revue makes fun of yearly, often at dusk, and have never felt unsafe. And as Gabriel_is_Satan said, being smart about property really cuts down on the chance of those crimes, though you can just be unlucky (but of course, you can be unlucky and have your car broken into anywhere). And I've never taken the shuttle, but that's a really good point Gabriel raised. Past a certain time (maybe 5ish? it gets dark early in New England in the winter), there is a shuttle that waits outside the front door of the building, leaving every 15 minutes and taking students to their front door. I want to say at :00 and :30 of every hour, it goes to the downtown areas, and at :15 and :30, it goes to east rock, but I could have that backwards since I've always just walked.

I would pushback a little against a blanket preference for east rock. If you have a family (one YLS poster here does), then East Rock makes perfect sense and is better, as it's more suburban and quiet and your kids can have a yard and ride their bikes. But if you're childless (especially if you're single), I'd highly recommend a downtown apartment. A lot of East Rock students get really frustrated because it's a bit of a walk from the school and downtown. It's not as easy to participate in a ton of the outside social events (since East Rock is so quiet, there's typically only one bar review done near East Rock a year, the rest are a 30 minute+ walk away). There's a lot to be said for being near all the action at the school, and all the bars and restaurants.


Thank you! This is all so helpful!!

What's the consensus on graduating housing? The apartments, not the dorms. I'm looking into one of them since I'm moving out from California and don't know too much about the area or have the capacity to go apt-hunting...

Gabriel_is_Satan
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby Gabriel_is_Satan » Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:17 pm

pandaaa wrote:What's the consensus on graduating housing? The apartments, not the dorms. I'm looking into one of them since I'm moving out from California and don't know too much about the area or have the capacity to go apt-hunting...


Coming alone or with a spouse? kids?

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:19 pm

pandaaa wrote:Thank you! This is all so helpful!!

What's the consensus on graduating housing? The apartments, not the dorms. I'm looking into one of them since I'm moving out from California and don't know too much about the area or have the capacity to go apt-hunting...


So, Gabriel made a good point, I'll give my advice for a single student. However, I especially wouldn't use any university housing if you have children.

So, I'm going to also talk about Dorms for others who might be thinking about them, but I'll talk about apartments in the next paragraph. But Dorms are extremely difficult to get as a law student. I think I only know one person who does so, and it's because of very special circumstances. So, the main graduate building is the Hall of Graduate Studies, next door to the law school actually. However, a few years back, because law students were not active in graduate student government, they voted to ban all law students from that building. That's still the case. So if you want to live in dorms, I believe you have to apply for the med school dorms or HHH(which is typically saved for international graduate students), which are a hike away from the school right where the city turns rough, have communal bathrooms, and generally suck (if you can get in there at all).

I have a friend in Yale apartments. I will say that there are not an unlimited number of these things, so most hook up with an older student already living in one as a roommate. But they do exist, I think they're okay, and they're comparably priced. That said, I really disagree with getting one just for the convenience. Many students who come here do not know about the area or go apartment hunting. They do it online or use word of mouth. I see no reason you can't research it as well and see what you think, I listed some of the more used landlords up above, but there are dozens. And you're probably jumping the gun. I know it's natural to think you need to go ahead and secure housing, but if I were you, I'd hang back for a few months. There should be a housing spreadsheet distributed on the facebook class page for you to find roommates, and there will be a TON of vacancies in May, meaning rent prices will go down. Also, if you used a roommate, there's a good chance they will be ASW, and so will probably do apartment hunting themselves, and you can just jump on board with them. Just a thought.

Gabriel_is_Satan
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby Gabriel_is_Satan » Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:22 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:You're buying a huge amount of flexibility at YLS, which 85% of admits here think is worth it.


Really curious now. 15% regret choosing YLS? Why? They regret turning down a full scholarship at CCN or something? or HLS? (and again: why?)

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:31 pm

Gabriel_is_Satan wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:You're buying a huge amount of flexibility at YLS, which 85% of admits here think is worth it.


Really curious now. 15% regret choosing YLS? Why? They regret turning down a full scholarship at CCN or something? or HLS? (and again: why?)


Oh, sorry Gabriel. I was referring to the typical retention rate. It's more like 82-83%, but it's easier to round. I was saying that of all the YLS admits, like 85% choose YLS, and the majority are going to have a full-ride somewhere in the T14 (though not necessarily to CCN). Only like 35 people each year choose not to come, and that encompasses those that are from Cali and choose Stanford, people who choose HLS, those that decide not to attend law school, and those that decide to take the money elsewhere. I do know a couple people who feel law wasn't for them, but they still think YLS is the best option. I was talking to someone in the know last month, who said they weren't aware of a single person transferring out to another school in the past 20 years.

pandaaa
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby pandaaa » Sat Feb 25, 2017 7:12 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:Thank you! This is all so helpful!!

What's the consensus on graduating housing? The apartments, not the dorms. I'm looking into one of them since I'm moving out from California and don't know too much about the area or have the capacity to go apt-hunting...


So, Gabriel made a good point, I'll give my advice for a single student. However, I especially wouldn't use any university housing if you have children.

So, I'm going to also talk about Dorms for others who might be thinking about them, but I'll talk about apartments in the next paragraph. But Dorms are extremely difficult to get as a law student. I think I only know one person who does so, and it's because of very special circumstances. So, the main graduate building is the Hall of Graduate Studies, next door to the law school actually. However, a few years back, because law students were not active in graduate student government, they voted to ban all law students from that building. That's still the case. So if you want to live in dorms, I believe you have to apply for the med school dorms or HHH(which is typically saved for international graduate students), which are a hike away from the school right where the city turns rough, have communal bathrooms, and generally suck (if you can get in there at all).

I have a friend in Yale apartments. I will say that there are not an unlimited number of these things, so most hook up with an older student already living in one as a roommate. But they do exist, I think they're okay, and they're comparably priced. That said, I really disagree with getting one just for the convenience. Many students who come here do not know about the area or go apartment hunting. They do it online or use word of mouth. I see no reason you can't research it as well and see what you think, I listed some of the more used landlords up above, but there are dozens. And you're probably jumping the gun. I know it's natural to think you need to go ahead and secure housing, but if I were you, I'd hang back for a few months. There should be a housing spreadsheet distributed on the facebook class page for you to find roommates, and there will be a TON of vacancies in May, meaning rent prices will go down. Also, if you used a roommate, there's a good chance they will be ASW, and so will probably do apartment hunting themselves, and you can just jump on board with them. Just a thought.


I'm single, and I would want a studio. I don't intend on living with others. It is a personal preference. How easy it is to come by a studio or even a 1 bedroom?

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KissMyAxe
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:36 pm

pandaaa wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:Thank you! This is all so helpful!!

What's the consensus on graduating housing? The apartments, not the dorms. I'm looking into one of them since I'm moving out from California and don't know too much about the area or have the capacity to go apt-hunting...


So, Gabriel made a good point, I'll give my advice for a single student. However, I especially wouldn't use any university housing if you have children.

So, I'm going to also talk about Dorms for others who might be thinking about them, but I'll talk about apartments in the next paragraph. But Dorms are extremely difficult to get as a law student. I think I only know one person who does so, and it's because of very special circumstances. So, the main graduate building is the Hall of Graduate Studies, next door to the law school actually. However, a few years back, because law students were not active in graduate student government, they voted to ban all law students from that building. That's still the case. So if you want to live in dorms, I believe you have to apply for the med school dorms or HHH(which is typically saved for international graduate students), which are a hike away from the school right where the city turns rough, have communal bathrooms, and generally suck (if you can get in there at all).

I have a friend in Yale apartments. I will say that there are not an unlimited number of these things, so most hook up with an older student already living in one as a roommate. But they do exist, I think they're okay, and they're comparably priced. That said, I really disagree with getting one just for the convenience. Many students who come here do not know about the area or go apartment hunting. They do it online or use word of mouth. I see no reason you can't research it as well and see what you think, I listed some of the more used landlords up above, but there are dozens. And you're probably jumping the gun. I know it's natural to think you need to go ahead and secure housing, but if I were you, I'd hang back for a few months. There should be a housing spreadsheet distributed on the facebook class page for you to find roommates, and there will be a TON of vacancies in May, meaning rent prices will go down. Also, if you used a roommate, there's a good chance they will be ASW, and so will probably do apartment hunting themselves, and you can just jump on board with them. Just a thought.


I'm single, and I would want a studio. I don't intend on living with others. It is a personal preference. How easy it is to come by a studio or even a 1 bedroom?


Extremely easy, I'm alone in a 1 bedroom, many of my friends are in studios or 1 bedrooms. Come May, when tons of Yale University students are leaving, there will be hundreds of availabilities.

Gabriel_is_Satan
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby Gabriel_is_Satan » Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:13 am

KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:
I'm single, and I would want a studio. I don't intend on living with others. It is a personal preference. How easy it is to come by a studio or even a 1 bedroom?


Extremely easy, I'm alone in a 1 bedroom, many of my friends are in studios or 1 bedrooms. Come May, when tons of Yale University students are leaving, there will be hundreds of availabilities.


It's one of the upsides of New Haven. Being a student living off debt makes you a good candidate on the rental market :lol:.

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pawneeron
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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby pawneeron » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:21 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:If I am looking for housing in New Haven, what part of downtown New Haven is generally the safer area?


But a lot of students live in the Novella, 360 State, and The Taft and all are happy with their choices. East Rock is a bit of a further walk, but a lot of people live there as well and like it (and most professors live in that area). I would not live in the Towers, as some students in my class have had some serious issues there.


A little late to the boat here, but could you elaborate on what types of issues students have had with the Towers?

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Re: Yale 1L taking questions

Postby KissMyAxe » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:28 pm

pawneeron wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:
pandaaa wrote:If I am looking for housing in New Haven, what part of downtown New Haven is generally the safer area?


But a lot of students live in the Novella, 360 State, and The Taft and all are happy with their choices. East Rock is a bit of a further walk, but a lot of people live there as well and like it (and most professors live in that area). I would not live in the Towers, as some students in my class have had some serious issues there.


A little late to the boat here, but could you elaborate on what types of issues students have had with the Towers?


PM me.




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