Yale score on LST

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supersplittysplitter
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Yale score on LST

Postby supersplittysplitter » Tue Dec 02, 2014 2:47 am

I have a very simple question- why does Yale have such a low score on law school transparency (78.8 %)? Does that number not include federal clerkships or something? I've spent a fair amount of time on LST and this is something that I've aways been curious about.

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banjo
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Re: Yale score on LST

Postby banjo » Tue Dec 02, 2014 3:51 am

That 78.8% figure includes full-time, long-term, JD-required jobs. It doesn't include the many unicorn jobs that YLS students routinely choose over traditional legal work.

You can read the school's take here: http://www.law.yale.edu/studentlife/cdo ... usnews.htm

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reasonable person
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Re: Yale score on LST

Postby reasonable person » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:50 am

banjo wrote:That 78.8% figure includes full-time, long-term, JD-required jobs. It doesn't include the many unicorn jobs that YLS students routinely choose over traditional legal work.

You can read the school's take here: http://www.law.yale.edu/studentlife/cdo ... usnews.htm


TITCR
Yale Law students are too good for fed clerkships/biglaw.

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jbagelboy
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Re: Yale score on LST

Postby jbagelboy » Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:13 am

LST includes federal clerkships, which I would remind you are one year or very occasionally 2 year commitments. It also includes those who start immediately with their firm, as a government attorney (e.g., DOJ or state AG/PD), or at a legal public interest organization full time.

It does not include some "short term" non-school funded legal fellowships, those who return immediately to another graduate program, journalism fellowships, jd-preferred business roles, think tanks, political staffers and policy analysts, and some other state or federal gov't positions that do not require the bar. Yale's generous loan repayment provides for non-legal in addition to legal positions, which definitely helps students explore these kinds of opportunities in other sectors.

And, believe it or not, there are even at Yale a handful of students who can't find the job they want when they graduate and show up as unemployed on ABA. But I really wouldn't worry about that.

TheNextAmendment
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Re: Yale score on LST

Postby TheNextAmendment » Tue Dec 02, 2014 12:17 pm

jbagelboy wrote:LST includes federal clerkships, which I would remind you are one year or very occasionally 2 year commitments. It also includes those who start immediately with their firm, as a government attorney (e.g., DOJ or state AG/PD), or at a legal public interest organization full time.

It does not include some "short term" non-school funded legal fellowships, those who return immediately to another graduate program, journalism fellowships, jd-preferred business roles, think tanks, political staffers and policy analysts, and some other state or federal gov't positions that do not require the bar. Yale's generous loan repayment provides for non-legal in addition to legal positions, which definitely helps students explore these kinds of opportunities in other sectors.

And, believe it or not, there are even at Yale a handful of students who can't find the job they want when they graduate and show up as unemployed on ABA. But I really wouldn't worry about that.


This. The LST employment algorithm accurately assesses the employment opportunities for all of the law schools listed except Yale. In other words, Yale is above LST.

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Elston Gunn
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Re: Yale score on LST

Postby Elston Gunn » Tue Dec 02, 2014 12:26 pm

jbagelboy wrote:LST includes federal clerkships, which I would remind you are one year or very occasionally 2 year commitments. It also includes those who start immediately with their firm, as a government attorney (e.g., DOJ or state AG/PD), or at a legal public interest organization full time.

It does not include some "short term" non-school funded legal fellowships, those who return immediately to another graduate program, journalism fellowships, jd-preferred business roles, think tanks, political staffers and policy analysts, and some other state or federal gov't positions that do not require the bar. Yale's generous loan repayment provides for non-legal in addition to legal positions, which definitely helps students explore these kinds of opportunities in other sectors.

And, believe it or not, there are even at Yale a handful of students who can't find the job they want when they graduate and show up as unemployed on ABA. But I really wouldn't worry about that.


This is pretty much it.

Certainly it's true that Yale's LST score does not reflect it's relative placement power of the school--it's not unreasonable to guess (though even we students can't ever really know how many people miss out) that all but 1 or 2 people per class that want big law get it, for instance.

I think the biggest thing the LST reflects is how often people who go to law school find out they don't actually want to be lawyers. For a number of reasons, having to do likely more with student background than the school (though the LRAP helps), Yale students are much more able to leave the law entirely or limit themselves only to the legal jobs that actually interest them.




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