Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

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VMeyer4
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Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:57 pm

Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby VMeyer4 » Wed Sep 25, 2013 9:53 am

Hi,

I am a fourth year undergraduate student in Bioengineering (5 year program, as co-op is mandatory). Much of my recent research says that if I want to obtain a position as a biotech patent attorney, I should obtain an advanced degree in Biomedical Engineering, Biotechnology, etc. However, I am looking to work in biomechanics and bioelectronics. According to a patent attorney I recently spoke with, those two areas fall more into the realm of mechanical and electrical, so an advanced degree would not be necessary. What are your thoughts on this?

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chem
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Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby chem » Wed Sep 25, 2013 10:09 am

VMeyer4 wrote:Hi,

I am a fourth year undergraduate student in Bioengineering (5 year program, as co-op is mandatory). Much of my recent research says that if I want to obtain a position as a biotech patent attorney, I should obtain an advanced degree in Biomedical Engineering, Biotechnology, etc. However, I am looking to work in biomechanics and bioelectronics. According to a patent attorney I recently spoke with, those two areas fall more into the realm of mechanical and electrical, so an advanced degree would not be necessary. What are your thoughts on this?


Advanced degree is not necessary in any case, but would be immensely helpful. If there is that much overlap, I'd see what kind of investment a Masters would be in EE, and then you would be all set

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typ3
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Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby typ3 » Wed Sep 25, 2013 1:57 pm

Biomechanics / Bioelectronics is over specialized for patent law in this area. You're not going to work at a firm doing enough biotech patents to keep yourself busy without doing other EE / ME patents from clients. Plus there is a glut of biotech attorneys at the moment. Only get an advanced bioengineering degree if you plan on working in industry before going to law school and you know you will be doing biotech work in industry. Normally, even if you were going to do biotech / bioengineering EE/ME is a better route. I don't know what your career services / admissions has been advising you on.

TLDR: Get an advanced ME or EE not an advanced biotech / bioengineering for patent work.

Anonymous Associate
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Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby Anonymous Associate » Thu Sep 26, 2013 11:00 pm

Yeah, like other said, your area is too specific.

Do you want litigation, prosecution, or some hybrid?

VMeyer4
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:57 pm

Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby VMeyer4 » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:54 am

Anonymous Associate wrote:Yeah, like other said, your area is too specific.

Do you want litigation, prosecution, or some hybrid?


I am probably going to do a hybrid of litigation and prosecution. One reason I was concerned is I am looking at a lot of law firms that deal in IP law and Patent law and there are not very many who got their undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering. However, I remembered that a large amount of biomedical engineers prefer medical school to law school. In addition, I looked into my future schedule. I am going to be taking signal processing and biomedical electronics, and I have the opportunity to at least take 3 or 4 courses to gain a better understanding of biomechanics, so I think I'll be okay. These courses should give me a solid background for mechanical and electrical engineering. Plus, it seems to me that most biotech jobs are the ones that involve more biology, biochemistry, etc. Thus, it makes sense that an M.S. or Ph.D would be more necessary for biotech. Thank you guys for all your help!

Mizz
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:51 am

Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby Mizz » Tue Oct 01, 2013 12:55 am

VMeyer4 wrote:
Anonymous Associate wrote:Yeah, like other said, your area is too specific.

Do you want litigation, prosecution, or some hybrid?


I am probably going to do a hybrid of litigation and prosecution. One reason I was concerned is I am looking at a lot of law firms that deal in IP law and Patent law and there are not very many who got their undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering. However, I remembered that a large amount of biomedical engineers prefer medical school to law school. In addition, I looked into my future schedule. I am going to be taking signal processing and biomedical electronics, and I have the opportunity to at least take 3 or 4 courses to gain a better understanding of biomechanics, so I think I'll be okay. These courses should give me a solid background for mechanical and electrical engineering. Plus, it seems to me that most biotech jobs are the ones that involve more biology, biochemistry, etc. Thus, it makes sense that an M.S. or Ph.D would be more necessary for biotech. Thank you guys for all your help!



I think it's a good idea to realize that most people don't end up doing a hybrid. If you're at an IP boutique, you may grab some work in pros if you're mostly lit or vice versa, but I'd really start to think about which one you'd want to be the majority of your practice. If you think lit is preferable, then the advanced degree is not necessary, especially if you're interested in big GP firms. If you want to do prosecution, particularly at a prosecution boutique, then it will help.

I'd also consider the market. NYC firms in general seems more relaxed on the advanced degrees, whereas in a city like Boston for example, an advanced degree is nearly mandatory for pros.

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rinkrat19
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Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 01, 2013 12:59 am

Look up firms that do the sort of work you're interested in and see what degrees their attorneys have.

VMeyer4
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:57 pm

Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby VMeyer4 » Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:31 am

rinkrat19 wrote:Look up firms that do the sort of work you're interested in and see what degrees their attorneys have.


I looked up three big firms that have all types of practice (I am looking to get into Big Law). Two were based in Boston, the other, Atlanta. It's pretty much a mixed bag, as there is a good amount of people with advanced degrees and a good amount of people without. The associates at one firm in Boston (4 of them), had advanced degrees, while a couple at the other firm in Boston did not. At the one in Atlanta, there was a mix. These firms all practice patent prsoecution and litigation as far as I could tell.

Anonymous Associate
Posts: 159
Joined: Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:54 pm

Re: Biomechanics/Bioelectronics Patent Attorney

Postby Anonymous Associate » Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:54 pm

Mizz wrote:
VMeyer4 wrote:
Anonymous Associate wrote:Yeah, like other said, your area is too specific.

Do you want litigation, prosecution, or some hybrid?


I am probably going to do a hybrid of litigation and prosecution. One reason I was concerned is I am looking at a lot of law firms that deal in IP law and Patent law and there are not very many who got their undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering. However, I remembered that a large amount of biomedical engineers prefer medical school to law school. In addition, I looked into my future schedule. I am going to be taking signal processing and biomedical electronics, and I have the opportunity to at least take 3 or 4 courses to gain a better understanding of biomechanics, so I think I'll be okay. These courses should give me a solid background for mechanical and electrical engineering. Plus, it seems to me that most biotech jobs are the ones that involve more biology, biochemistry, etc. Thus, it makes sense that an M.S. or Ph.D would be more necessary for biotech. Thank you guys for all your help!



I think it's a good idea to realize that most people don't end up doing a hybrid. If you're at an IP boutique, you may grab some work in pros if you're mostly lit or vice versa, but I'd really start to think about which one you'd want to be the majority of your practice. If you think lit is preferable, then the advanced degree is not necessary, especially if you're interested in big GP firms. If you want to do prosecution, particularly at a prosecution boutique, then it will help.

I'd also consider the market. NYC firms in general seems more relaxed on the advanced degrees, whereas in a city like Boston for example, an advanced degree is nearly mandatory for pros.


This is correct. One thing litigators often do is to work on post-issuance proceedings, which I find an interesting complement to my litigation practice.




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