Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

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scifiguy
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Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby scifiguy » Fri Aug 23, 2013 2:59 am

I'm curious what opportunities students may have to publish original research and legal analysis in scholarly journals as either a law school student or biglaw associate?

I'm aware that there're school specific journals that students sometimes participate in, but what of the broader professional/academic legal community? Are law students able to submit research articles to professional journals while in law school? And would this work similar to the blind, peer-review processes common in the sciences and humanities?

Once out of law school, how common is it for lawyers - particularly biglaw associates - to publish in journals? (I'm aware from speaking to biglaw personnel in the past that this can be a way to distinguish oneself in a firm for promotion or simply continued employment purposes.) TVM everyone!

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Ludo!
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby Ludo! » Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:38 am

Jesus fuck I thought you were banned

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:56 am

Law review articles are not reviewed blind or peer reviewed.

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pupshaw
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby pupshaw » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:21 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:Law review articles are not reviewed blind or peer reviewed.


That depends on the law review.

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:42 am

cerealdan wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:Law review articles are not reviewed blind or peer reviewed.


That depends on the law review.

Okay, but the vast majority aren't.

maximator
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby maximator » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:34 am

There are two sorts of publications and it's not really clear which you are talking about.

There are "scholarly" articles that are long, theoretical, and intended mainly for academics. These show up in student-run law journals and are usually written by and for professors. Practicing lawyers can and do publish in law reviews, but not nearly as frequently as professors. These usually aren't peer-reviewed--the articles are picked by students.

There are also publications for practicing lawyers. Articles in these tend to be much shorter and much less theoretical (e.g. describing a new type of transaction). These are the sorts of articles that are probably much more likely to be written by biglaw attorneys. Just go to a firm's website and browse some random profiles. Often there will be a place for "publications" and you can take a look at what some lawyers have written.

I really have no idea whether publishing helps advance someone's non-academic career. My best guess is that having multiple publications in a certain area might be a way to demonstrate expertise to clients and so it could help your career in that sense.

badaboom61
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Re: Publishing Scholarly Legal Articles - In Law School & Beyond

Postby badaboom61 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:56 am

Publications that are relevant to your area of practice can help advance a biglaw career by demonstrating knowledge, expertise, and authority. Publications outside of your field in practical law journals won't help you. A groundbreaking article in the Yale Law Review on the postmodernist implications of critical race law and economics basket weaving won't help you.

This means that publishing is generally only useful for someone with a very narrow practice. Niche areas of law, like tax and bankruptcy, lend themselves well to publishing. On the other hand, a general commercial litigator or a general M&A attorney probably would find it a waste of time to try to publish anything.




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