Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
User avatar
polareagle
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:04 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby polareagle » Tue Oct 11, 2016 2:15 pm

hirudexo wrote:A search of this thread about LRW grading tells me that you can get a DS in LRW. Should I still assume that is the case if my Climenko has written on the syllabus/assignments that class/assignment will be graded on the "standard HLS scale of honors, pass, low pass, fail"? Any clue why they don't mention DS? Also, does anyone know if DS's are given out on assignments (closed memo/open memo) or only for the final grade, e.g. could someone get an H on each memo and at the end of the semester get a DS in the class, or do you need to get a DS on at least one of the memos to have a shot? I understand it is possible that it varies by professor, and if so, any idea on what is most prevalent?


I'm afraid to disappoint you, but as you say, it varies tremendously by Climenko, and it'd be hard for anybody to know what the most prevalent choices are. I'll give my personal experience/opinion. Take it with as much salt as you'd like.

For the grading (on a semesterly basis), I'm sure they all give out DS's. Technically, the "DS" is a prize not a grade. (Indeed, on your transcript, the DS shows up as H* and just below that it notes that you were awarded a dean's scholar prize). Perhaps that explains why it doesn't show up on the syllabus.

As far as your grading on each assignment, you could get an H on both the closed and open memos and get either a DS or an H for the semester. (Unlikely a P.) If you go P,H, still a good shot at an H. P,P, almost certainly a a P. H,P? Tough. But probably a P. P+,P+? Maybe an H. Maybe a P. (Yes, most Climenkos will give out + and - grades on assignments.) There's too many possibilities, and it's not worth trying to game them all out.

I can almost guarantee that a Climenko will not give out a DS on the first assignment. It's worth a comparatively smaller portion of your grade, and it would look bad on the back end if you got DS (open memo), P (closed memo), P (final grade).

In fact, for the most part, I understand Climenkos try to grade the first assignment rather harshly so as to give them more options later on. (If your Climenko is new this year, they're also going to have no idea how to scale the assignments anyway.)

Last year a delightfully naive 1L got upset at me (on here) for suggesting that the LRW course does not operate according to the precise percentages printed on the syllabus. I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but grading writing is a lot more of an amorphous process than that. Your grade will be in large part determined by how you do on the open memo, and the closed memo will make a difference for some people at the margins.

So, the takeaway from this? Try hard on both of them. Not just for the grade (statistically, you reading this will be getting a P). But because writing is one of the most important tools of our trade, and you should take the time to learn legal writing.

Also, please take time to learn the Bluebook. I'm currently clerking, and seeing errors in actual briefs is incredibly frustrating. You have people dedicated to teaching you the Bluebook right now; take advantage of them.

Good luck!

hirudexo
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:58 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby hirudexo » Tue Oct 11, 2016 2:27 pm

polareagle wrote:

Thank you so much for this response; it wasn't disappointing or bad news, because personal experience on the matter was exactly what I was hoping for. Your explanation and examples cleared up exactly what I was wondering about. Thanks again for the info and advice.

thegoat2019
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 6:30 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby thegoat2019 » Mon Oct 17, 2016 5:25 pm

Anyone who's taken the Negotiation Workshop as their 1L Spring Elective have any thoughts on it? Is it worth having 8 hours of class every week, how much of a commitment is it, the substance of the class, etc. Thank you!

User avatar
t-14orbust
Posts: 2066
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 4:43 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Mon Oct 17, 2016 7:51 pm

Can anyone here comment on how competitive/difficult it is to get the Semester at Columbia Public Education Policy and Consulting Clinic?

User avatar
Pneumonia
Posts: 1644
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Pneumonia » Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:53 pm

thegoat2019 wrote:Anyone who's taken the Negotiation Workshop as their 1L Spring Elective have any thoughts on it? Is it worth having 8 hours of class every week, how much of a commitment is it, the substance of the class, etc. Thank you!

I'll give my two cents on this (I took it Spring of 1L and am a 3L now). The short version is that I think it's worth it some circumstances, but not as many as the course organizers would have you believe. And although I'm happy that I took the course while at HLS, I wish that I would have taken something else for my 1L elective.

Course description.

I’ll start by describing the course. You meet twice a week from 5:00–9:00 or some similar time. Those hours will be divided into four roughly-equal increments: one hour of formal lecture, one hour of mock negotiation, one hour of reviewing the negotiation, and one hour of small-group discussion/lecture. It’s usually in that order, but not always. The class has about 140 people, which are further divided into 7 or so “working groups” of twenty people each. Everything except the formal lecture takes place in the small group. You get to know these people well, and I made a few lasting friendships out of mine.

The downside of this structure is that you’ll usually only spend about an hour per day doing actual negotiations, frequently much less. That’s not a negative in itself, but it is to the extent that it means the other three hours will be some variation of a lecture. The small group discussions are interactive, but it’s still a lot of material to get through—and it’s very often repetitive or dull. Meeting at night does not help attention levels, not to mention that it can make preparing for your other classes a bit more difficult. It’s essentially two weeknights per week that you’re not going to get much reading done, if any. Four hours is a long time, and even though 9:00 isn’t that late, I was usually too mentally/emotionally drained to meaningful preparation for class after the workshop met. You also have to prepare for the negotiations outside of class time, which takes maybe another hour or so per class. Lastly, although there is reading assigned for each class, I only know one person who ever did it.

The upside of the structure/course is that—due to the long hours—your interpersonal skills really do improve. At least mine did, and I think others from my working group would say the same. I’m not necessarily a better negotiator, but I’m absolutely a better communicator (some would say those are synonymous, but I digress). Another good thing about the course is that it’s fun. The negotiations are engaging and well thought out. The instructors are excellent, and it’s not a legal topic. There are a lot of cross registrants too. My small group featured MIT, HBS, HKS, and two other Harvard grad schools. It can be tough to really engage with those people as a 1L, but even seeing them on a weekly basis reminds you that there’s more to the world than law school.

As far as grading goes, the regular curve applies to 1Ls. You have to submit twice-monthly journal “reflections” of about 2000 words or so. Then there’s a “final journal” (longer length) and a research paper. I think every working-group leader grades differently. For mine, I think that classroom participation and thoughtful journals were a prerequisite for an H, but not a guarantee. In other words, you have to take all aspects of the course seriously in order to get an H.

I’ll also say that I think the people who run the program WAY overhype it to 1Ls. It’s actually not all that tough to get in (I think my year there were <10 1Ls who wanted it but didn’t get it), it’s not universally recognized by employers as a positive signal, and it’s not going to change your life. People for whom it was the best class in law school are in the minority. So don’t get oversold at the pitch meeting.

Having an accurate picture of the course is the first half of your decision. The second half is comparing the course to your other options.

Which 1Ls should take the course?

I think the course makes a lot of sense for transactional types, especially people who are going to focus on deal work. You’ll meet some like-minds, and the course goes a along way towards improving your “bedside manner” with clients and opposing parties. Taking this course is also a no-brainer for HBS dual-degree students and for HLS students who are looking to make the jump to consulting (assuming the B-school doesn’t have a better analog?). I’m not certain, but I think transactional employers recognize it as a good/worthwhile choice.

It should also go without saying that this course makes sense for anyone who wants to take Deals or other offerings for which the Workshop is a prerequisite. For people who are focusing generally on corporate work, it might make more sense to take corporations as your elective depending on which areas of corporate law you are more interested in. It’s probably also a good call for people who don’t know what they want to do.

Which 1Ls should think twice before taking the course?

Would-be litigators and clerks should not take this course as 1Ls. That’s a strong point, but I think it holds. I’m going into litigation. Out of everyone I interviewed with—screeners, callbacks, judges etc.—precisely no one was impressed that I took it. Most people didn’t know what it was, which meant that more than a few times I was left explaining why—upon my first opportunity to choose my coursework—I elected to take a mushy, vaguely transactional-sounding Workshop. It’s not impossible to give a good answer to that question, but you’re better off if it doesn’t arise in the first place, especially for 1L private-sector interviews.

For EIP, it may not matter as much. If you’ve got the grades for litigation, you’re probably going to be ok. But for clerking it’s a different story. Now that all the feeder/fancy judges interview during the summer following 1L, you’ve really only got one slot on your transcript to demonstrate to the judge what kind of student you are and what you’re interested in. Much better to take something like Admin or 14th (subjects that judges are equipped to talk about and interested to quiz you on). I realize this advice only applies to 20% or so of students, but I really can’t emphasize enough how useless it would be to take this class as a 1L for future clerks and litigators. But perhaps others will have a different view.

Closing thoughts.

Negotiation is a fun class—the most fun that I had at HLS (though nowhere near my favorite class). However, unless you’re really interested in the material or need it as a prereq, I’d think twice about taking it as a 1L. Between the class (8 hours), preparing for negotiations (2 hours), and writing the journals (2 hours), the workshop easily takes more time than a black letter course like Admin or 14th. Even if you slack off, you’ve still gotta be in class 8 hours a week minimum, and you’re not allowed to skip or miss.

For anyone who knows what they want to do, I think the best use of the 1L elective is to get a headstart in understanding your field. For some, the Workshop fits that bill. For the rest, I’d consider taking something else. The workshop isn’t an easy H, it’s not a blow off class, you can’t miss it, and it takes a bunch of time. All of which means that it’s also not the right course for people who are burnt out from 1L Fall and want to pad their schedule.

Finally, I'll add the usually disclaimer that all of this is just my opinion. I’m sure there are divergent views that are equally supportable. The only thing I’d really fight for here is that aspiring clerks/HLR/magna/lit-boutique types should steer clear of this, at least for 1L.

ETA that this post is directed at 1Ls who are considering NW as their spring elective.
Last edited by Pneumonia on Tue Oct 18, 2016 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
radio1nowhere
Posts: 355
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 7:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby radio1nowhere » Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:46 pm

Pneumonia wrote:


I'd like to nominate this as a Good Post™

despina
Posts: 477
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:09 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Tue Oct 18, 2016 5:29 pm

I agree with a lot of the above, but I would highly recommend NW to everyone as a 1L. I've written this before several times in this thread but:

1. It's WAY easier to get in as a 1L. Depending on the year and scheduling conflicts, almost all 1L applicants get in. After 1L, you'll have to rank it #1 and you still may never get in.

2. As Pneumonia says, it will definitely improve your communication skills. I'm a year and a half into real-world practice, and I use stuff I learned in NW pretty much daily (meeting with clients, talking to opposing counsel, figuring out office dynamics, etc).

3. If you take it as a 1L, you have access to the advanced curriculum including dispute systems design, facilitation, the clinic, multiparty negotiation, mediation, etc. If you don't take it as a 1L, you may never get to do those things because you first have to get into NW (it's only offered in winter and spring), and then you have to get into those classes (which are also limited; some are application-only). If you think you have any interest in the advanced curriculum, taking NW as a 1L is the way to go. I did several of these and was VERY glad I did.

I strongly disagree with the statement that "would-be litigators" shouldn't take this class as a 1L. I didn't apply for clerkships or biglaw, so I can't speak to the "will this impress your interviewers" question. But it has definitely made me a better litigator. As I said, as a litigator I use NW skills pretty much daily.

I also disagree with the estimate that you only spend an hour per class in actual mock negotiation. There may have been a few classes where this was true, especially at the beginning, but in a lot of other classes the "actual negotiation" was several hours or the entire period, and there are also mini-negotiations / activities during the small group part of the class. I do agree that the readings and big lectures can be redundant.
Last edited by despina on Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Pneumonia
Posts: 1644
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Pneumonia » Tue Oct 18, 2016 11:14 pm

despina wrote: It's WAY easier to get in as a 1L. Depending on the year and scheduling conflicts, almost all 1L applicants get in. After 1L, you'll have to rank it #1 and you still may never get in.
My experience bears this out as well. And to that extent my post overlooks the reality that, if you want to take the course at all, 1L is the easiest time to do so.

despina wrote: If you take it as a 1L, you have access to the advanced curriculum including dispute systems design, facilitation, the clinic, multiparty negotiation, mediation, etc. If you don't take it as a 1L, you may never get to do those things because you first have to get into NW (it's only offered in winter and spring), and then you have to get into those classes (which are also limited; some are application-only). If you think you have any interest in the advanced curriculum, taking NW as a 1L is the way to go. I did several of these and was VERY glad I did.
100% agree that it makes complete sense to take the course 1L if you're interested in any of these courses.

despina wrote: I strongly disagree with the statement that "would-be litigators" shouldn't take this class as a 1L. I didn't apply for clerkships or biglaw, so I can't speak to the "will this impress your interviewers" question. But it has definitely made me a better litigator. As I said, as a litigator I use NW skills pretty much daily.
I'm still just a student, but I have no trouble believing that NW skills are useful day-to-day as a litigator. I was thinking more of students who are interested in appellate stuff, but I didn't mean to say that the course isn't useful for anyone—only that there are better options for appellate-focused people. I guess one way to characterize the choice would be as between maximizing your chances at a good post law-school outcome by taking 14th or Admin, and maximizing your effectiveness in whatever job you get once you get it. I totally agree that NW is going to pay dividends in pretty much any job. But people will have different ways of weighing which of the two "benefits" is more valuable.

The reason I mentioned "impressing interviewers" is that the course organizers pitched that as one of the big reasons to take the course 1L. I think that, like most courses, NW isn't really going to matter for interviews one way or the other. But at the pitch meeting I went to, NW's benefits for interviews were really emphasized. I just wanted to point out that they failed to materialize in my case. The overall point being that, at least for appellate types, having NW on your transcript isn't going to impress anyone (not that much else will, either).

despina wrote: I also disagree with the estimate that you only spend an hour per class in actual mock negotiation. There may have been a few classes where this was true, especially at the beginning, but in a lot of other classes the "actual negotiation" was several hours or the entire period, and there are also mini-negotiations / activities during the small group part of the class. I do agree that the readings and big lectures can be redundant.
Yeah my memory might be a bit hazy on this point. When I wrote "one hour" I actually thought I was being generous, though. In my group, there were a lot of 30–45 minute negotiations, and a few 2+ hour negotiations; the former outnumbered the latter. It wouldn't surprise me if they change it up a bit every year. Also, good point about the small group sessions including some mini-negotiations. That's not something that frequently occurred in my working group, but I heard from others in my year that they did a lot of it. I think it goes to show that the individual working groups can have a good deal of variation depending on instructor.

As a final point I'd like to clarify/reiterate that my post was directed solely at 1Ls considering NW. I'll edit the "who should/shouldn't" portions to reflect that. I 100% agree that it's a helpful course, and Despina is right that it's much easier to get as a 1L than at any other time. Perhaps that will change the calculus for some folks.

despina
Posts: 477
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:09 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:49 am

Pneumonia wrote:I think it goes to show that the individual working groups can have a good deal of variation depending on instructor.


100% agree with this. My working group was amazing, both instructor-wise and student-wise, which I think contributed a lot to my positive experience in the course. I've never heard of someone hating their instructor or saying the working group was worthless, but it's definitely a source of variability in student experience.

Orion311
Posts: 114
Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2014 7:11 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Orion311 » Tue Oct 25, 2016 4:14 pm

Does anyone have info on how much Clark's Corporations waitlist moves? I'm currently 55th on the list and the class has 84 spots. Do I have a shot?

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Wed Oct 26, 2016 2:20 pm

Orion311 wrote:Does anyone have info on how much Clark's Corporations waitlist moves? I'm currently 55th on the list and the class has 84 spots. Do I have a shot?

This is for the spring, right after spring elective preferencing happened but (I think) before results are announced? My guess is that the waitlist is about to move a lot as people get spring electives that conflict with a Corporations class that they chose five or six months ago. You should be able to get this class, unless something weird is going on with the Corps options this year.

That's generally what happens with all but the most sought-after classes (Klarman's 14th Amendment, etc.).

lawlorbust
Posts: 265
Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2014 11:50 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby lawlorbust » Thu Oct 27, 2016 6:44 am

tomwatts wrote:
Orion311 wrote:Does anyone have info on how much Clark's Corporations waitlist moves? I'm currently 55th on the list and the class has 84 spots. Do I have a shot?

This is for the spring, right after spring elective preferencing happened but (I think) before results are announced? My guess is that the waitlist is about to move a lot as people get spring electives that conflict with a Corporations class that they chose five or six months ago. You should be able to get this class, unless something weird is going on with the Corps options this year.

That's generally what happens with all but the most sought-after classes (Klarman's 14th Amendment, etc.).


Yes, you'll probably be able to get into Corps. IIRC, even Klarman went firesale last year.

ETA: Sorry - lazy (or half-asleep) posting. What I meant was that I vaguely recall that Klarman's 14th ended up on the open seats list last year.
Last edited by lawlorbust on Thu Oct 27, 2016 9:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
TripTrip
Posts: 2740
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:52 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby TripTrip » Thu Oct 27, 2016 8:35 am

lawlorbust wrote:
tomwatts wrote:
Orion311 wrote:Does anyone have info on how much Clark's Corporations waitlist moves? I'm currently 55th on the list and the class has 84 spots. Do I have a shot?

This is for the spring, right after spring elective preferencing happened but (I think) before results are announced? My guess is that the waitlist is about to move a lot as people get spring electives that conflict with a Corporations class that they chose five or six months ago. You should be able to get this class, unless something weird is going on with the Corps options this year.

That's generally what happens with all but the most sought-after classes (Klarman's 14th Amendment, etc.).


Yes, you'll probably be able to get into Corps. IIRC, even Klarman went firesale last year.

A firesale only happens when there are too many people on the waitlist to get through them all in 24hr periods before the class starts. If something goes on firesale it's because the waitlist was too long. For most classes, especially Klarman's, you would need to already be on the good side of the waitlist because the Registrar still goes in waitlist order for the firesale.

The benefit of the firesale is that it kicks apathetic students who don't reply to the email off the waitlist.

User avatar
Nonconsecutive
Posts: 2248
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 4:58 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Nonconsecutive » Thu Oct 27, 2016 6:22 pm

TripTrip wrote:The benefit of the firesale is that it kicks apathetic students who don't reply to the email off the waitlist.


Of all my faults, not removing myself from waitlists for courses I'm no longer interested in is not one of them. I think it stems from my UG which had no waitlists and where the registration system crashed without fail every single time registration rolled around. It built my registration empathy by a good deal.

User avatar
SweetTort
Posts: 2444
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby SweetTort » Sat Oct 29, 2016 10:07 am

Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!

User avatar
Dcc617
Posts: 1487
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Dcc617 » Sat Oct 29, 2016 10:11 am

SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


They gyms sort of suck. Hemenway is tiny and too crowded. Malkin has stupid hours and not enough equipment and space.

I'm more into powerlifting stuff though.

User avatar
SweetTort
Posts: 2444
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby SweetTort » Sat Oct 29, 2016 11:00 am

Dcc617 wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


They gyms sort of suck. Hemenway is tiny and too crowded. Malkin has stupid hours and not enough equipment and space.

I'm more into powerlifting stuff though.


I'm into the standard bench/legs/run/basketball sort of gym. Will I have any good options within walking distance?

User avatar
Dcc617
Posts: 1487
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Dcc617 » Sat Oct 29, 2016 11:10 am

SweetTort wrote:
Dcc617 wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


They gyms sort of suck. Hemenway is tiny and too crowded. Malkin has stupid hours and not enough equipment and space.

I'm more into powerlifting stuff though.


I'm into the standard bench/legs/run/basketball sort of gym. Will I have any good options within walking distance?


Malkin has a big basketball court. Hemenway's is always slammed. I haven't been able to check out Murr yet, but it's right over the river.

I don't know about non school ones. I'm getting by on campus, it just irks me sometimes.

ETA So Hemenway has one power rack, one squat rack, two flat barbell benches, one pull-up bar, one dip place, and other stuff. It just has no floor space and is always busy with law students and undergrads. Malkin is similar, except it's less busy (at least when I make it over there).

User avatar
leslieknope
Posts: 1093
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:53 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby leslieknope » Sat Oct 29, 2016 11:31 am

SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


I'm not an RA, but I have some friends who are. From what I can tell it seems like minimal responsibility for a pretty significant perk - getting to live on campus basically for free (I think the dude I know who's RAing for North pays like $300 a year). Your responsibilities are basically helping at move-in and move-out, running hall programming every once in awhile, and responding to lockouts. As far as I can tell, the only significant downside is having to be on campus during J-Term and for a week in August. Regarding competitiveness – of the people I know who applied for it, 3 got it and 2 didn't.

There are two career counselling offices on campus - OCS for private sector careers and judicial clerkships, and OPIA for public interest careers and fellowships. They're both awesome and staffed by super dedicated people who know everything and everyone and are as available as you want them to be. I've taken ample advantage of both OCS and OPIA and they've definitely helped me get to opportunities I would not have had otherwise, and have made otherwise weird and complicated processes a lot smoother. If you have more specific questions about those I'm happy to speak to them.

User avatar
SweetTort
Posts: 2444
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby SweetTort » Sat Oct 29, 2016 11:33 am

leslieknope wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


I'm not an RA, but I have some friends who are. From what I can tell it seems like minimal responsibility for a pretty significant perk - getting to live on campus basically for free (I think the dude I know who's RAing for North pays like $300 a year). Your responsibilities are basically helping at move-in and move-out, running hall programming every once in awhile, and responding to lockouts. As far as I can tell, the only significant downside is having to be on campus during J-Term and for a week in August. Regarding competitiveness – of the people I know who applied for it, 3 got it and 2 didn't.

There are two career counselling offices on campus - OCS for private sector careers and judicial clerkships, and OPIA for public interest careers and fellowships. They're both awesome and staffed by super dedicated people who know everything and everyone and are as available as you want them to be. I've taken ample advantage of both OCS and OPIA and they've definitely helped me get to opportunities I would not have had otherwise, and have made otherwise weird and complicated processes a lot smoother. If you have more specific questions about those I'm happy to speak to them.



Thanks so much for the feedback!

This is a bit embarrassing, but by counseling I was referring to psychology/psychiatry rather than career counseling. Though it's nice to know those options are available as well!

o0o0o0o
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:44 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby o0o0o0o » Sun Oct 30, 2016 12:24 am

SweetTort wrote:
leslieknope wrote:
SweetTort wrote:Hey, all! Thanks for answering questions.

So, I submitted my H app a week or two ago, and I'm seriously considering biting the debt bullet and going. I had a few questions regarding student QOL though.

1) Is there a gym on campus? Specifically, is there a decent gym within walking distance from Groupius?
2) I know that for the residence halls, there's a way for 2L's and 3L's to make money by being an RA/mentor or something. Can someone speak to this, and how competitive it is?
3) Is there a counseling center on campus and, if so, how is it? I've significantly benefitted from counseling in UG and I'd love to continue talking to someone in law school.

Thanks for your help!


I'm not an RA, but I have some friends who are. From what I can tell it seems like minimal responsibility for a pretty significant perk - getting to live on campus basically for free (I think the dude I know who's RAing for North pays like $300 a year). Your responsibilities are basically helping at move-in and move-out, running hall programming every once in awhile, and responding to lockouts. As far as I can tell, the only significant downside is having to be on campus during J-Term and for a week in August. Regarding competitiveness – of the people I know who applied for it, 3 got it and 2 didn't.

There are two career counselling offices on campus - OCS for private sector careers and judicial clerkships, and OPIA for public interest careers and fellowships. They're both awesome and staffed by super dedicated people who know everything and everyone and are as available as you want them to be. I've taken ample advantage of both OCS and OPIA and they've definitely helped me get to opportunities I would not have had otherwise, and have made otherwise weird and complicated processes a lot smoother. If you have more specific questions about those I'm happy to speak to them.



Thanks so much for the feedback!

This is a bit embarrassing, but by counseling I was referring to psychology/psychiatry rather than career counseling. Though it's nice to know those options are available as well!


Not embarrassing at all. That is also available with no copay as part of the HUHS health plan. There's a location within the law school although demand is high relative to supply so you may find more availability walking to the Harvard Square HUHS location

thegoat2019
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 6:30 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby thegoat2019 » Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:07 am

Is it normal to feel like you have absolutely no idea what the hell is going on in CivPro at this point in the sem? I can probs go back and look things up to try to come up with an answer (that's prob not complete and most likely wrong), but really hard to keep some concepts straight and worried that I won't know what to do once the exam comes around....

User avatar
TripTrip
Posts: 2740
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:52 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby TripTrip » Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:20 am

thegoat2019 wrote:Is it normal to feel like you have absolutely no idea what the hell is going on in CivPro at this point in the sem? I can probs go back and look things up to try to come up with an answer (that's prob not complete and most likely wrong), but really hard to keep some concepts straight and worried that I won't know what to do once the exam comes around....

Yeah. I still don't know what the hell is going on in Civ Pro.

despina
Posts: 477
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:09 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:50 am

TripTrip wrote:
thegoat2019 wrote:Is it normal to feel like you have absolutely no idea what the hell is going on in CivPro at this point in the sem? I can probs go back and look things up to try to come up with an answer (that's prob not complete and most likely wrong), but really hard to keep some concepts straight and worried that I won't know what to do once the exam comes around....

Yeah. I still don't know what the hell is going on in Civ Pro.


Yes, second this. I didn't really understand CivPro until I actually did some federal civil litigation after law school. Studying for the exam I figured out all the individual rules, but it didn't really "click" for me until I was actually working on a case and saw how it all fit together for my client.

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Mon Nov 07, 2016 12:37 pm

It clicked for me a few days before the exam. I also got a DS. This is not a representative experience. For most people, it doesn't click until after law school.

I worked through a good deal of Glannon before I felt like I had a good sense of Civ Pro. I hear that a lot of other people have a similar experience. Jurisdiction is messy and International Shoe's standard is way too open-ended. The other stuff — preclusion and the like — is really complicated and abstract but makes sense when you see what it's trying to do.




Return to “Ask a Law Student / Graduate”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest