Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
bbsg
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby bbsg » Fri Jun 27, 2014 10:18 am

Zipcar 4 lyfe.

(Edit - 180, woo)

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MyopicVisage
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby MyopicVisage » Fri Jun 27, 2014 12:18 pm

.
Last edited by MyopicVisage on Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

rathgra
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby rathgra » Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:47 pm

despina wrote:
Doorkeeper wrote: I also would've started creating my outlines earlier in the semester. Your outline should be done by the time reading period starts.


Lots of people have said variations on this throughout the thread but it's worth repeating here: just because X study technique works for Y person doesn't mean you should be doing it or that it will necessarily work for you.

Every semester, I've only barely started my outlines before reading period starts. Making outlines is my main method of studying, so by the time my outline is done I'm basically ready for the exam. I'm usually not done with my outline until a day or two before the exam for that class. This has consistently worked for me. The thing that has helped keep my stress level manageable is realizing that if the way I do things works for me, I genuinely don't have to worry that somebody else is using a totally different technique or is on a totally different timeline.


Seconding this - my biggest law school exam advice is to know yourself and trust yourself. You did well in undergrad. There's no need to take up some intense new strategy just because you're at HLS. Trust what you've done before and don't get caught in the echo chamber.

My method of studying (whenever possible) is to spend a full day (10-12 hours) interacting in some way with a pre-existing outline three to four days before the exam. If the class hasn't changed substantially, I just cut it down to a 5-10 pager. If it has, I add my notes. Once I do that, I'm all set to take practice tests. It's an adapted version of how I studied in undergrad and it works quite well - for me. I was at my most stressed both fall/spring when I started comparing myself to other people instead of just focusing on what had worked for me in the past.

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jrf12886
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby jrf12886 » Sun Jun 29, 2014 7:43 pm

rathgra wrote:
despina wrote:
Doorkeeper wrote: I also would've started creating my outlines earlier in the semester. Your outline should be done by the time reading period starts.


Lots of people have said variations on this throughout the thread but it's worth repeating here: just because X study technique works for Y person doesn't mean you should be doing it or that it will necessarily work for you.

Every semester, I've only barely started my outlines before reading period starts. Making outlines is my main method of studying, so by the time my outline is done I'm basically ready for the exam. I'm usually not done with my outline until a day or two before the exam for that class. This has consistently worked for me. The thing that has helped keep my stress level manageable is realizing that if the way I do things works for me, I genuinely don't have to worry that somebody else is using a totally different technique or is on a totally different timeline.


Seconding this - my biggest law school exam advice is to know yourself and trust yourself. You did well in undergrad. There's no need to take up some intense new strategy just because you're at HLS. Trust what you've done before and don't get caught in the echo chamber.

My method of studying (whenever possible) is to spend a full day (10-12 hours) interacting in some way with a pre-existing outline three to four days before the exam. If the class hasn't changed substantially, I just cut it down to a 5-10 pager. If it has, I add my notes. Once I do that, I'm all set to take practice tests. It's an adapted version of how I studied in undergrad and it works quite well - for me. I was at my most stressed both fall/spring when I started comparing myself to other people instead of just focusing on what had worked for me in the past.


Mostly agree with this. Just be aware that studying for a law school exam is very different from studying in college. I never used outlines prepared by other people, and (tried) to make mine steadily throughout the semester. You will figure out what works for you. But for your first semester, I would stick to the traditional methods: read before class and take notes, take notes during lecture, condense those notes into an outline. Study your outline during reading period and do practice exams. You can eliminate steps you feel are unecessary after the first semester based on how you did and what you felt was most useful. You will definitely fall behind at times, but this is a good plan to strive for.

despina
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Sun Jun 29, 2014 10:09 pm

Agreed with the above. I think when people say "just keep doing what worked for you in undergrad," they aren't necessarily referring to specific study techniques so much as overall approach.

If studying in a group never worked for you in undergrad, don't force yourself to do it now. If making yourself a strict schedule for reading period and working out every day kept you focused, do that. If taking verbatim notes on a laptop / taking multicolored notes with twelve different gel pens worked for you, keep doing that.

But yeah, for sure the specifics of law school work are going to be different from undergrad, regardless of what your major was. Agree that some variation on "do most of the reading, go to most of the classes, take good notes, make some kind of outline, take some practice tests" is a good starting point for 1L.

bbsg
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby bbsg » Sun Jun 29, 2014 11:52 pm

MyopicVisage wrote:
bbsg wrote:Zipcar 4 lyfe.

(Edit - 180, woo)


Do zipcars in Cambridge have bike racks? I'm bringing my mountain bike to school.


Some might? (I'm not sure). None that I've ever used have had bike racks to my knowledge. Not that I've ever looked.

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BlakcMajikc
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby BlakcMajikc » Mon Jun 30, 2014 3:02 pm

MyopicVisage wrote:What's the consensus on bringing a car to campus? Not recommended?
Has anyone brought his/her car to school and doesn't regret doing it? For what reason?

Thanks!


despina wrote:The short answer:

Cars are expensive to park, totally unnecessary for daily life in Cambridge / Boston, and impossible for a commute to the law school. Most HLS students don't have cars on campus.

However, it's very nice to have one for grocery shopping and weekend trips. Many who have cars are people whose spouse / partner is not a law student.


I didnt want to sell my car, parents live in upstate ny, and i snowboard.
Brought a car to Cambridge, switched my plates/insurance to mass., use the Cambridge street parking pass.
Best decision i've ever made at HLS, and glad i spent the hour at the dmv and $25 per YEAR.

There's tons of street parking near the law school, but you have to have the Cambridge resident parking pass.
If you live on campus in the dorms, then having a car is tougher because you have to live off campus to get the pass. But if you live in the dorms, I have other thoughts previously articulated in this thread.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Mon Jun 30, 2014 5:21 pm

Thanks for clarifying BlakcMajikc. At this point I don't really remember how much of this has been discussed before in the thread so I guess I'll just go for it...

Yes, street parking is cheap if you get a Cambridge resident permit (although I'm sure somewhere on the thread people have talked about the pain of figuring out how / where to move your car for street cleaning days). When I talked about parking being expensive, I meant more if you want a law school parking spot (either in the dorms, or under Wasserstein) -- those are mad expensive.

If you live in Cambridge, though, then the benefit of commuting to school and parking on the street are marginal -- especially if you need to drive during rush hour, you'll likely waste more time in traffic and looking for spaces than you would have just walking or taking a bus. So driving is impractical.

And if you come from outside of Cambridge, then you might as well take public transit, because otherwise you'll be looking for a metered space (depending on the day / hour can be few and far between, and not cheap, and a huge pain to come back every few hours to add coins), or you'll need to pay for a campus parking permit. Plus you have the same problem with traffic as Cambridge residents, if not more.

Someone correct me please if I'm missing something, but I just can't see how it could possibly make sense for anybody to plan to drive to school every day unless you have a lot of extra money to throw on a Wasserstein lot permit?

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Mon Jun 30, 2014 5:27 pm

despina wrote:Thanks for clarifying BlakcMajikc. At this point I don't really remember how much of this has been discussed before in the thread so I guess I'll just go for it...

Yes, street parking is cheap if you get a Cambridge resident permit (although I'm sure somewhere on the thread people have talked about the pain of figuring out how / where to move your car for street cleaning days). When I talked about parking being expensive, I meant more if you want a law school parking spot (either in the dorms, or under Wasserstein) -- those are mad expensive.

If you live in Cambridge, though, then the benefit of commuting to school and parking on the street are marginal -- especially if you need to drive during rush hour, you'll likely waste more time in traffic and looking for spaces than you would have just walking or taking a bus. So driving is impractical.

And if you come from outside of Cambridge, then you might as well take public transit, because otherwise you'll be looking for a metered space (depending on the day / hour can be few and far between, and not cheap, and a huge pain to come back every few hours to add coins), or you'll need to pay for a campus parking permit. Plus you have the same problem with traffic as Cambridge residents, if not more.

Someone correct me please if I'm missing something, but I just can't see how it could possibly make sense for anybody to plan to drive to school every day unless you have a lot of extra money to throw on a Wasserstein lot permit?


If you live a ways away, you can drive to a bus stop and then take the bus the last little bit, too.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Mon Jun 30, 2014 5:51 pm

ph14 wrote:If you live a ways away, you can drive to a bus stop and then take the bus the last little bit, too.


True, but that seems impractical / not worth it to me. You would have to figure out how to park at a bus / T stop and likely pay to park your car all day. I don't see why anyone would want to live that far away, except to save money, and I'm not sure whether you'd be able to save enough in rent to make up for the price of parking plus the extra time spent on transit. For example, parking at the Alewife T station costs $7 / day.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Mon Jun 30, 2014 5:56 pm

despina wrote:
ph14 wrote:If you live a ways away, you can drive to a bus stop and then take the bus the last little bit, too.


True, but that seems impractical / not worth it to me. You would have to figure out how to park at a bus / T stop and likely pay to park your car all day. I don't see why anyone would want to live that far away, except to save money, and I'm not sure whether you'd be able to save enough in rent to make up for the price of parking plus the extra time spent on transit. For example, parking at the Alewife T station costs $7 / day.


I know people who did it and they said it worked for them. I don't think they pay for parking at the bus stop.

despina
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:11 pm

ph14 wrote:
despina wrote:
ph14 wrote:If you live a ways away, you can drive to a bus stop and then take the bus the last little bit, too.


True, but that seems impractical / not worth it to me. You would have to figure out how to park at a bus / T stop and likely pay to park your car all day. I don't see why anyone would want to live that far away, except to save money, and I'm not sure whether you'd be able to save enough in rent to make up for the price of parking plus the extra time spent on transit. For example, parking at the Alewife T station costs $7 / day.


I know people who did it and they said it worked for them. I don't think they pay for parking at the bus stop.


Nice. I'd be curious where they lived / parked and what route they took. I know a number of people who commute daily by bus or T but I don't think I've heard of anyone who regularly does car plus transit.

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wert3813
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:18 pm

Anybody know where I can read a #smarttake that's a unique perspective on the Hobby Lobby case? Something that isn't just the same stuff being said over and over again?

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BlakcMajikc
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby BlakcMajikc » Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:56 pm

despina wrote:Thanks for clarifying BlakcMajikc. At this point I don't really remember how much of this has been discussed before in the thread so I guess I'll just go for it...

Yes, street parking is cheap if you get a Cambridge resident permit (although I'm sure somewhere on the thread people have talked about the pain of figuring out how / where to move your car for street cleaning days). When I talked about parking being expensive, I meant more if you want a law school parking spot (either in the dorms, or under Wasserstein) -- those are mad expensive.

If you live in Cambridge, though, then the benefit of commuting to school and parking on the street are marginal -- especially if you need to drive during rush hour, you'll likely waste more time in traffic and looking for spaces than you would have just walking or taking a bus. So driving is impractical.

And if you come from outside of Cambridge, then you might as well take public transit, because otherwise you'll be looking for a metered space (depending on the day / hour can be few and far between, and not cheap, and a huge pain to come back every few hours to add coins), or you'll need to pay for a campus parking permit. Plus you have the same problem with traffic as Cambridge residents, if not more.

Someone correct me please if I'm missing something, but I just can't see how it could possibly make sense for anybody to plan to drive to school every day unless you have a lot of extra money to throw on a Wasserstein lot permit?


No problem. Housing and transportation are so dependent on each other that it is very hard to generalize. If you live in Cambridge, you most likely won't be in rush hour both ways, so traffic may or may not be as big of an issue. And street parking even during rush hour is quite easy.

Even with that being said, despina is spot on that the public transportation is solid, so there's no need to use a car for a commute. And it isn't that helpful for daily life. However, my car has been great for my non-daily tasks.

My real advice is: that if possible, don't bring a car to campus as a 1L, see what works or doesn't work for you, and then after you scope out the situation decide if you want one for the horrific 1L boston winter or later during 2L/3L.

(random note: if you have a child/baby, consider bringing your car just because the winters can be pretty rough for parents if your family isnt used to the cold weather.)

bbsg
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby bbsg » Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:50 pm

wert3813 wrote:Anybody know where I can read a #smarttake that's a unique perspective on the Hobby Lobby case? Something that isn't just the same stuff being said over and over again?


HLPR often has a decent (albeit unabashedly left-wing oriented) article up shortly after a major case is decided.

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wert3813
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Tue Jul 01, 2014 12:58 am

bbsg wrote:
wert3813 wrote:Anybody know where I can read a #smarttake that's a unique perspective on the Hobby Lobby case? Something that isn't just the same stuff being said over and over again?


HLPR often has a decent (albeit unabashedly left-wing oriented) article up shortly after a major case is decided.

Yes. Yes they do.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby gottago » Tue Jul 01, 2014 1:25 am

How feasible is it to live on 500/mo after accounting for Gropius, HUHS insurance, etc?

I'm not a big eater--this summer I've been spending $80/mo on food that I eat at home although I prob buy m misc snacks randomly and eat out w/ others occasionally, so I figure no more than $130/mo on food.

Also, when you've dealt with SFS to discuss special situations, have they been accommodating or more like "the rules are the rules"?

My situation isn't like a wholesale waiver of parental forms. More like I'd provide them with tax transcripts instead of the full returns.

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jrf12886
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby jrf12886 » Tue Jul 01, 2014 1:44 am

gottago wrote:How feasible is it to live on 500/mo after accounting for Gropius, HUHS insurance, etc?

I'm not a big eater--this summer I've been spending $80/mo on food that I eat at home although I prob buy m misc snacks randomly and eat out w/ others occasionally, so I figure no more than $130/mo on food.

Also, when you've dealt with SFS to discuss special situations, have they been accommodating or more like "the rules are the rules"?

My situation isn't like a wholesale waiver of parental forms. More like I'd provide them with tax transcripts instead of the full returns.


You can definitely live on $500/month, but not if you eat at the Hark every day. It's much cheaper to buy groceries and only go to the Hark ocassionally. Other than that, just don't go crazy on drinks (fairly expensive in Boston/Cambridge) and 500 is doable.

Not sure, about SFS. They seemed pretty strict in all my dealings with them.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby DrSpaceman » Tue Jul 01, 2014 1:46 am

MyopicVisage wrote:Do zipcars in Cambridge have bike racks? I'm bringing my mountain bike to school.


This is the whitest quote of all time.

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MyopicVisage
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby MyopicVisage » Tue Jul 01, 2014 5:26 am

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Last edited by MyopicVisage on Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby acrossthelake » Tue Jul 01, 2014 11:53 am

gottago wrote:How feasible is it to live on 500/mo after accounting for Gropius, HUHS insurance, etc?

I'm not a big eater--this summer I've been spending $80/mo on food that I eat at home although I prob buy m misc snacks randomly and eat out w/ others occasionally, so I figure no more than $130/mo on food.

Also, when you've dealt with SFS to discuss special situations, have they been accommodating or more like "the rules are the rules"?

My situation isn't like a wholesale waiver of parental forms. More like I'd provide them with tax transcripts instead of the full returns.


As long as you're mostly cooking and not eating out much this is feasible, though cooking often in Gropius will be an accomplishment that many set out to do, but don't succeed in. If you're committed you definitely can, though. Or if you barely eat in general that works.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby TripTrip » Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:46 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
gottago wrote:How feasible is it to live on 500/mo after accounting for Gropius, HUHS insurance, etc?

I'm not a big eater--this summer I've been spending $80/mo on food that I eat at home although I prob buy m misc snacks randomly and eat out w/ others occasionally, so I figure no more than $130/mo on food.

Also, when you've dealt with SFS to discuss special situations, have they been accommodating or more like "the rules are the rules"?

My situation isn't like a wholesale waiver of parental forms. More like I'd provide them with tax transcripts instead of the full returns.


As long as you're mostly cooking and not eating out much this is feasible, though cooking often in Gropius will be an accomplishment that many set out to do, but don't succeed in. If you're committed you definitely can, though. Or if you barely eat in general that works.

I am definitely in the pack of setting out to cook in Gropius, then never doing it.

Your proximity to a kitchen will correlate with your motivation to cook.

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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:50 pm

TripTrip wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
gottago wrote:How feasible is it to live on 500/mo after accounting for Gropius, HUHS insurance, etc?

I'm not a big eater--this summer I've been spending $80/mo on food that I eat at home although I prob buy m misc snacks randomly and eat out w/ others occasionally, so I figure no more than $130/mo on food.

Also, when you've dealt with SFS to discuss special situations, have they been accommodating or more like "the rules are the rules"?

My situation isn't like a wholesale waiver of parental forms. More like I'd provide them with tax transcripts instead of the full returns.


As long as you're mostly cooking and not eating out much this is feasible, though cooking often in Gropius will be an accomplishment that many set out to do, but don't succeed in. If you're committed you definitely can, though. Or if you barely eat in general that works.

I am definitely in the pack of setting out to cook in Gropius, then never doing it.

Your proximity to a kitchen will correlate with your motivation to cook.


Is it mostly distance, or do the kitchens tend to be crowded? I really want to try and meal-prep for 3-5 days at a time, but these posts aren't very encouraging.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby acrossthelake » Tue Jul 01, 2014 5:18 pm

t-14orbust wrote:
Is it mostly distance, or do the kitchens tend to be crowded? I really want to try and meal-prep for 3-5 days at a time, but these posts aren't very encouraging.


The feasibility of being able to take up enough of the shared fridge space for this is going to be unpredictable.

For the people I know, it was less about distance to the kitchen, and more about getting the damn groceries, and then where to store them. Though there's a smaller market nearby that overcharges, walking the 15-20(you need to slow down when it's icy) minutes to Star Market in the frigid cold is annoying. I was a lot better at cooking for myself in the warmer months, but it's hard to motivate yourself to leave the sanctity of warm buildings to walk through icy, slippery streets (be careful, I've fallen a couple times) in the dark to get to the grocery store when you've got other stuff to take care of anyway.

If you do want to do this, I recommend a zip car account, setting a dedicated time each week to go, a grocery store buddy (sort of like a gym buddy), etc. Or just finding an apartment near the grocery store.

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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Tue Jul 01, 2014 5:27 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
t-14orbust wrote:
Is it mostly distance, or do the kitchens tend to be crowded? I really want to try and meal-prep for 3-5 days at a time, but these posts aren't very encouraging.


The feasibility of being able to take up enough of the shared fridge space for this is going to be unpredictable.

For the people I know, it was less about distance to the kitchen, and more about getting the damn groceries, and then where to store them. Though there's a smaller market nearby that overcharges, walking the 15-20(you need to slow down when it's icy) minutes to Star Market in the frigid cold is annoying. I was a lot better at cooking for myself in the warmer months, but it's hard to motivate yourself to leave the sanctity of warm buildings to walk through icy, slippery streets (be careful, I've fallen a couple times) in the dark to get to the grocery store when you've got other stuff to take care of anyway.

If you do want to do this, I recommend a zip car account, setting a dedicated time each week to go, a grocery store buddy (sort of like a gym buddy), etc. Or just finding an apartment near the grocery store.


Guess it isn't happening during the winter. I have enough trouble getting out when it's raining here in CA. Thanks for the input




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