Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
tomwatts
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:28 pm

Searchparty wrote:Also... if I'm ranked better than 20 on WL for Feldman's 1A (out of 100 seats), chances? Anyone have any experience with how quickly his (or Klarman's) WL moves?

I think under 20 means you get in, though possibly not until October. Spring waitlists move slowly until spring elective preferencing.

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wert3813
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 12:01 am

If I have an ADTH do I have to open it in the morning? Or can I open it at 1 and finish at 9?

despina
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Wed Apr 16, 2014 12:12 am

wert3813 wrote:If I have an ADTH do I have to open it in the morning? Or can I open it at 1 and finish at 9?


If you mean "all day take home," then no. If you don't open before 8:30, still have to finish by 4:30. If you mean "any day take home," then you can take it during any 8-hour period.

http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/re ... -page.html

All ONE-DAY Take-home exams are due by 4:30PM on the scheduled exam day. The exam question is available for download starting at 7:30am. Exams which are downloaded between 7:30am-8:30am will have 8-hours, except when noted otherwise on the exam instructions, from the time they download to submit their answer (ex. an exam downloaded at 7:45am is due by 3:45pm). Please Note: Exams downloaded after 8:30am will not have the full 8-hours to complete and submit since the exam is due by 4:30pm.

ANY-DAY Take-home exams may be taken in any 8-hour period during the scheduled exam period. ANY-DAY Take-home exams must be submitted within 8-hours from downloading the exam question.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:28 pm

What is the general grade breakdown of a course? Are some courses/professors notoriously more lenient/stricter in terms of giving out H's?

Any housing recommendations?

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:32 pm

emu42 wrote:What is the general grade breakdown of a course? Are some courses/professors notoriously more lenient/stricter in terms of giving out H's?

Any housing recommendations?


We don't know for sure, but look at the first post in this thread. It's hard to tell which professors are more lenient or stricter in terms of grades, or even to what degree of flexibility a professor has to deviate from any potential suggested curve. Again, check out the first post in this thread for a compilation of people's thoughts on the matter.

tomwatts wrote:
Because I'm bored, here's a bunch of information about grades. By way of preface, I looked all this up mostly because I like numbers and find doing this sort of research fun, not because I'm a deranged gunner, even though I realize "deranged gunner" is how this sort of thing comes across on TLS.

Feel free to quote this liberally when grades questions come in next week.

THE HISTORY OF HLS GRADES, PRE-REFORM TO NOW

Back in 2009, the Acting Dean of HLS, Howell Jackson, announced a grade distribution for the new grades (apparently carrying out one of the last Elena Kagan reforms). Prior to this time, the grading system was on an A, B, etc., scale. According to the HL Record, the distribution in 1L classes from 1996 to 2000 (and likely well before and well after that) was: 8-11% A, 17-19%A-, 32-34% B+, 29-32% B, 7-8% B-, and 1% each of A+ and C or lower.

The published grade distribution, according to Above the Law and corroborated by the Crimson, was:

Quote:
In classes with over 30 JD and LLM students enrolled, the recommended distribution of grades is: 37 percent Honors; 55 percent Pass; and 8 percent Low Pass.... Up to two Dean’s Scholar Prizes per class may be awarded in recognition of outstanding work, provided there are more than 30 JD and LLM students in the course following drop/add.


This began during the 2009-10 school year. This means that we're now in the fifth year of the new grades. (Wow, really? That means my 1L year was the third year. No wonder no one knew what the hell any of it meant.)

In the second year (2010-11), under the new Dean Martha Minow, some stealth changes were introduced (at least, that's Above the Law's way of describing it). The grade distribution returned to being unpublished, although there's no reason to believe that it changed substantially, and, judging by informal conversations I've had with professors, it didn't, with the exceptions of DSs and LPs.

Specifically, according to the Crimson, profs were given "increased discretion over the number of Dean’s Scholar Prizes." No one knows exactly what that means, but guesses earlier in this thread have suggested in the vicinity of 3-5 for a class of 80. According to the HL Record, giving LPs also became discretionary (that is, a prof can give zero). And, judging by the "The curve is suggested in all classes with over 30 students" answer in that interview, the curve became a bit more flexible (that is, a prof can give 31 H's in a class of 80, which is over 38%, and no one cares).

Finally, again according to the Crimson, the current grade point system was introduced, along with — I believe — the current system of calculating Latin honors at graduation.

THE CURRENT GRADE DISTRIBUTION (vs. the old one)

Judging by the above, it's something like this (in PERCENTILES, not percent correct or something):

94-99: DS (discretionary; could be 96-99, or whatever)
63-93: H
8-63: P
0-7: LP (discretionary: could be 0-4, or whatever)

The pre-reform grade distribution was, give or take:

99: A+
90-98: A
72-89: A-
39-71: B+
8-38: B
1-7: B-
0: C or lower

This was interesting to me, because it means, basically, that the new system is a really good excuse for grade inflation. Mark Weber was paraphrased in the Crimson as having equated the old A+ and the new DS, but the new DS is much more common (there are maybe 3-5 of them per 1L class section, as opposed to at most 1 in the old system). An H mostly overlaps with the old A/A- (63-93 for an H vs. 72-98 for an A/A-), but the cutoff is lower, so some old B+'s also become Hs. The LP overlaps with the old B-/C (0-7 [discretionary] for the LP vs. 0-7 for the B-/C), but because it's discretionary, there can be fewer of them than of the old B-/C.

LATIN HONORS

According to the current HLS grading policy, Latin honors are calculated as follows:

For each class, DS = 5, H = 4, P = 3, LP = 2, and F = 0. Calculate a GPA by calculating a weighted average of your grades for the year (weighted by the number of credits). Then average each of the three years of law school.

Thus, imagine a student with 1 DS and 4 Hs in regular 4-credit 1L classes and all Ps in the other 5 classes (including in both semesters of LRW and a 4-credit elective). That comes out to (from best grade to worst, by number of credits): [(4 * 5) + (4 * 4 * 4) + (3 * 4 * 3) + (2 * 2 * 3) ] / 36 = 3.67 for 1L year. If this student then had two more years of grades, you'd repeat the same calculation for each year individually, and then average the three years. So if 2L year gave 3.33 and 3L year gave 3.6, this student would have an overall GPA of 3.53. This is true despite the fact that the years have wildly different numbers of credits; each year is of equal weight regardless.

The top student gets summa, the next 10% get magna, and the next 30% get cum laude. TLS estimates put the cutoffs for cum laude as around 3.5 or so each year, and for magna around 3.9 or so. (These seem slightly low to me; I was told by a prof that magna is around 4.0, give or take.)

WHAT ALL THIS MEANS FOR A 1L WHO JUST GOT FIRST SEMESTER GRADES

Pretty much nothing. Average and median are about 1-2 Hs. If you did much better than that, don't get too cocky. You still have to do that another five times before you can stamp the "magna" on your transcript. If you did much worse than that, don't freak out. You've got five more semesters to figure it out. Talk to professors and see if you can get feedback. Talk to professors this semester and see if they can advise you how to study and what to pay attention to. Talk to 2Ls and 3Ls. Get outlines and hornbooks. Do something different. You'll be fine.

Even for EIP purposes, it's the total on the year that matters, not just one semester, and a great second semester will help to make up for a so-so first semester (and a crappy second semester can screw up whatever good stuff you've done in your first semester). So take it all with a grain of salt. There's quite a way left to go.

If you did really poorly (multiple LPs and no Hs), talk to OCS early, too. Part of what they paid for is making sure that all Harvard students get jobs when they graduate. They can figure out what you ought to do.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:48 pm

ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:What is the general grade breakdown of a course? Are some courses/professors notoriously more lenient/stricter in terms of giving out H's?

Any housing recommendations?


We don't know for sure, but look at the first post in this thread. It's hard to tell which professors are more lenient or stricter in terms of grades, or even to what degree of flexibility a professor has to deviate from any potential suggested curve. Again, check out the first post in this thread for a compilation of people's thoughts on the matter.

tomwatts wrote:
Because I'm bored, here's a bunch of information about grades. By way of preface, I looked all this up mostly because I like numbers and find doing this sort of research fun, not because I'm a deranged gunner, even though I realize "deranged gunner" is how this sort of thing comes across on TLS.

Feel free to quote this liberally when grades questions come in next week.

THE HISTORY OF HLS GRADES, PRE-REFORM TO NOW

Back in 2009, the Acting Dean of HLS, Howell Jackson, announced a grade distribution for the new grades (apparently carrying out one of the last Elena Kagan reforms). Prior to this time, the grading system was on an A, B, etc., scale. According to the HL Record, the distribution in 1L classes from 1996 to 2000 (and likely well before and well after that) was: 8-11% A, 17-19%A-, 32-34% B+, 29-32% B, 7-8% B-, and 1% each of A+ and C or lower.

The published grade distribution, according to Above the Law and corroborated by the Crimson, was:

Quote:
In classes with over 30 JD and LLM students enrolled, the recommended distribution of grades is: 37 percent Honors; 55 percent Pass; and 8 percent Low Pass.... Up to two Dean’s Scholar Prizes per class may be awarded in recognition of outstanding work, provided there are more than 30 JD and LLM students in the course following drop/add.


This began during the 2009-10 school year. This means that we're now in the fifth year of the new grades. (Wow, really? That means my 1L year was the third year. No wonder no one knew what the hell any of it meant.)

In the second year (2010-11), under the new Dean Martha Minow, some stealth changes were introduced (at least, that's Above the Law's way of describing it). The grade distribution returned to being unpublished, although there's no reason to believe that it changed substantially, and, judging by informal conversations I've had with professors, it didn't, with the exceptions of DSs and LPs.

Specifically, according to the Crimson, profs were given "increased discretion over the number of Dean’s Scholar Prizes." No one knows exactly what that means, but guesses earlier in this thread have suggested in the vicinity of 3-5 for a class of 80. According to the HL Record, giving LPs also became discretionary (that is, a prof can give zero). And, judging by the "The curve is suggested in all classes with over 30 students" answer in that interview, the curve became a bit more flexible (that is, a prof can give 31 H's in a class of 80, which is over 38%, and no one cares).

Finally, again according to the Crimson, the current grade point system was introduced, along with — I believe — the current system of calculating Latin honors at graduation.

THE CURRENT GRADE DISTRIBUTION (vs. the old one)

Judging by the above, it's something like this (in PERCENTILES, not percent correct or something):

94-99: DS (discretionary; could be 96-99, or whatever)
63-93: H
8-63: P
0-7: LP (discretionary: could be 0-4, or whatever)

The pre-reform grade distribution was, give or take:

99: A+
90-98: A
72-89: A-
39-71: B+
8-38: B
1-7: B-
0: C or lower

This was interesting to me, because it means, basically, that the new system is a really good excuse for grade inflation. Mark Weber was paraphrased in the Crimson as having equated the old A+ and the new DS, but the new DS is much more common (there are maybe 3-5 of them per 1L class section, as opposed to at most 1 in the old system). An H mostly overlaps with the old A/A- (63-93 for an H vs. 72-98 for an A/A-), but the cutoff is lower, so some old B+'s also become Hs. The LP overlaps with the old B-/C (0-7 [discretionary] for the LP vs. 0-7 for the B-/C), but because it's discretionary, there can be fewer of them than of the old B-/C.

LATIN HONORS

According to the current HLS grading policy, Latin honors are calculated as follows:

For each class, DS = 5, H = 4, P = 3, LP = 2, and F = 0. Calculate a GPA by calculating a weighted average of your grades for the year (weighted by the number of credits). Then average each of the three years of law school.

Thus, imagine a student with 1 DS and 4 Hs in regular 4-credit 1L classes and all Ps in the other 5 classes (including in both semesters of LRW and a 4-credit elective). That comes out to (from best grade to worst, by number of credits): [(4 * 5) + (4 * 4 * 4) + (3 * 4 * 3) + (2 * 2 * 3) ] / 36 = 3.67 for 1L year. If this student then had two more years of grades, you'd repeat the same calculation for each year individually, and then average the three years. So if 2L year gave 3.33 and 3L year gave 3.6, this student would have an overall GPA of 3.53. This is true despite the fact that the years have wildly different numbers of credits; each year is of equal weight regardless.

The top student gets summa, the next 10% get magna, and the next 30% get cum laude. TLS estimates put the cutoffs for cum laude as around 3.5 or so each year, and for magna around 3.9 or so. (These seem slightly low to me; I was told by a prof that magna is around 4.0, give or take.)

WHAT ALL THIS MEANS FOR A 1L WHO JUST GOT FIRST SEMESTER GRADES

Pretty much nothing. Average and median are about 1-2 Hs. If you did much better than that, don't get too cocky. You still have to do that another five times before you can stamp the "magna" on your transcript. If you did much worse than that, don't freak out. You've got five more semesters to figure it out. Talk to professors and see if you can get feedback. Talk to professors this semester and see if they can advise you how to study and what to pay attention to. Talk to 2Ls and 3Ls. Get outlines and hornbooks. Do something different. You'll be fine.

Even for EIP purposes, it's the total on the year that matters, not just one semester, and a great second semester will help to make up for a so-so first semester (and a crappy second semester can screw up whatever good stuff you've done in your first semester). So take it all with a grain of salt. There's quite a way left to go.

If you did really poorly (multiple LPs and no Hs), talk to OCS early, too. Part of what they paid for is making sure that all Harvard students get jobs when they graduate. They can figure out what you ought to do.

Thanks! Sorry for skipping the first page. The grading system sounds really good, no? Honors seems quite doable, and unless you really screw up, you should be getting at least the same grade as most of the class.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:50 pm

I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:55 pm

ph14 wrote:I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

I like the more flexible curve, too. I think at most other schools the curve is totally rigid.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:56 pm

emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

I like the more flexible curve, too. I think at most other schools the curve is totally rigid.


I assume it's probably reasonably rigid as a 1L.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:58 pm

ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

I like the more flexible curve, too. I think at most other schools the curve is totally rigid.


I assume it's probably reasonably rigid as a 1L.

This is a dumb question, but what are you graded on besides finals?

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Searchparty
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Searchparty » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:06 pm

emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

I like the more flexible curve, too. I think at most other schools the curve is totally rigid.


I assume it's probably reasonably rigid as a 1L.

This is a dumb question, but what are you graded on besides finals?


In 1L courses, nothing.

Other courses can count participation (I hear the professor needs special approval, at least for large courses?).
Some have problem sets, though I'm not sure to what extent that is incorporated into your grade.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:10 pm

emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:
ph14 wrote:I like it. You have ways to distinguish yourself at the top end unlike Yale, you don't have to worry too much about getting an outlier low grade, and you don't have to worry about pluses and minuses and other tiny variations. It's definitely a huge benefit to going to HLS, in my opinion. Of course, it's not that much different than the old grading system, you just now have 3 or 4 main grades instead of 5 or 6.

I like the more flexible curve, too. I think at most other schools the curve is totally rigid.


I assume it's probably reasonably rigid as a 1L.

This is a dumb question, but what are you graded on besides finals?


The vast majority of big doctrinal classes are graded 100% on a final exam. Some smaller courses have grades based on paper(s) and/or class participation.

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gb47
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby gb47 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:27 pm

Would it be crazy for me to commute from Beacon Hill as a 1L? I have a lot of friends in the area and my future roommate (not a HLS student) prefers it to Cambridge.

acrossthelake
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby acrossthelake » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:36 pm

gb47 wrote:Would it be crazy for me to commute from Beacon Hill as a 1L? I have a lot of friends in the area and my future roommate (not a HLS student) prefers it to Cambridge.


The time you'll waste commuting seems mighty unnecessary. For 1L, the limited free time you have on weekdays is probably best spent getting to know classmates or working out or eating healthy or sleeping instead of chilling with your friends. You can hang out with them on weekends and commute then.

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Searchparty
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Searchparty » Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:47 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
gb47 wrote:Would it be crazy for me to commute from Beacon Hill as a 1L? I have a lot of friends in the area and my future roommate (not a HLS student) prefers it to Cambridge.


The time you'll waste commuting seems mighty unnecessary. For 1L, the limited free time you have on weekdays is probably best spent getting to know classmates or working out or eating healthy or sleeping instead of chilling with your friends. You can hang out with them on weekends and commute then.


Also, I know a lot of my classmates that live decently far away are usually stuck on campus all day long, and into the night if there is an event going on at night. For instance, you have morning/early afternoon classes, and nothing else until 5, it's usually never worth it to go back. The plus is, it seems like some of my friends that do that get a lot of work done!

Or, if they want to hang out, everything is usually within walking distance from the school, so they have to stick around campus until, let's say, dinner if you made dinner plans.

For people (females, particularly) who don't enjoy walking/bike riding late at night by themselves.. this is often an issue in deciding whether you want to participate in late events.

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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:44 pm

Opinions on secondary journals and Federalist Society/American Constitution Society?

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:47 pm

t-14orbust wrote:Opinions on secondary journals and Federalist Society/American Constitution Society?


1. Go for it if you are interested in the subject matter or want to get involved in an organization.
2. A lot of people are involved in one or the other or attend events sponsored by these organizations. They provide a lot of events and content for students, and that's true even if you don't join the organization(s).

Don't expect either to have a material effect on anything. The journal might provide something additional to talk about during EIP, in addition to your 1L year and 1L summer job. ACS Fed Soc are also ways of signaling political leanings, if that is something important to you and you don't otherwise have such signals on your resume.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wwwcol » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:40 pm

Another nice perk of FedSoc and ACS is access to old outlines and exams. I know other orgs also have outline banks, but the size of the membership of these two means they probably have at least some materials for every prof who's taught here before.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:41 pm

Are we in rough shape for academia/a top (federal, I guess?) clerkship if we don't get on the Law Review? I'd imagine both are still possible but considerably harder.

emu42
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby emu42 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:42 pm

wwwcol wrote:Another nice perk of FedSoc and ACS is access to old outlines and exams. I know other orgs also have outline banks, but the size of the membership of these two means they probably have at least some materials for every prof who's taught here before.

What other groups have old outlines and exams?

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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:44 pm

Thanks for the responses guys. I'm definitely going to check them out.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:44 pm

emu42 wrote:
wwwcol wrote:Another nice perk of FedSoc and ACS is access to old outlines and exams. I know other orgs also have outline banks, but the size of the membership of these two means they probably have at least some materials for every prof who's taught here before.

What other groups have old outlines and exams?


That's a good point that wwwcol makes. I'd guess most of the rest of the major or established student organizations and cultural groups have some sort of outline/exam bank. Though I think he is right in saying that Fed Soc and ACS are among the outline banks with the most old materials.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:47 pm

emu42 wrote:Are we in rough shape for academia/a top (federal, I guess?) clerkship if we don't get on the Law Review? I'd imagine both are still possible but considerably harder.


Not necessarily. We have had SCOTUS clerks who weren't on law review and we have people with top feeder clerkships who weren't on law review. Academia is difficult to break into for anyone, but you are not necessarily shut out without law review. Grades, publications, publishing potential, clerkship, recommendations, field, fellowship, methodology, other graduate degrees, etc. are all important factors for breaking into academia.

I understand that you are probably just curious and are asking, which I definitely encourage, but I am always curious about people who decide they want to do academia before stepping foot in law school. If you have an interest in it, that's one thing, but I just find it odd when 0Ls are set on legal academia. As far as law review, I would again say that's not something you should worry about until the end of 1L.

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ph14
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:59 pm

ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:Are we in rough shape for academia/a top (federal, I guess?) clerkship if we don't get on the Law Review? I'd imagine both are still possible but considerably harder.


Not necessarily. We have had SCOTUS clerks who weren't on law review and we have people with top feeder clerkships who weren't on law review. Academia is difficult to break into for anyone, but you are not necessarily shut out without law review. Grades, publications, publishing potential, clerkship, recommendations, field, fellowship, methodology, other graduate degrees, etc. are all important factors for breaking into academia.

I understand that you are probably just curious and are asking, which I definitely encourage, but I am always curious about people who decide they want to do academia before stepping foot in law school. If you have an interest in it, that's one thing, but I just find it odd when 0Ls are set on legal academia. As far as law review, I would again say that's not something you should worry about until the end of 1L.


Also, consider checking the HLS website, which has information on some topics. Here's the page on legal academia: https://www.law.harvard.edu/current/car ... index.html. I'm not sure if admitted students can access the page yet or not.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Wed Apr 16, 2014 8:05 pm

ph14 wrote:
emu42 wrote:Are we in rough shape for academia/a top (federal, I guess?) clerkship if we don't get on the Law Review? I'd imagine both are still possible but considerably harder.

Not necessarily. We have had SCOTUS clerks who weren't on law review and we have people with top feeder clerkships who weren't on law review.

That being said, the clerkship process is much easier if you are on HLR than if you're not. There are other qualifications that will at least partially substitute for HLR (BSA, Ames Moot Court Finalist, top 5% grades, etc.), but HLR makes it easier.




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