Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Thu Apr 03, 2014 5:51 pm

DoubleChecks wrote:
hlsperson1111 wrote:I think I know exactly who you are talking about. FWIW, I am a terrible interviewer and it really hurt me come EIP (especially in converting CBs to offers). It's a learnable skill and my biggest piece of advice to all the 0Ls and 1Ls is that you should seriously work on it before EIP. Great interviewing will help you outperform your grades; bad interviewing will shut you out of firms where your grades are more than good enough.


Yeah, and I think being a strong, professional interviewer is just seen as a really big asset. I'm always so impressed by that 29/30 ratio -- it's so badass haha.


What makes a strong, professional interviewer exactly?

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wert3813
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:01 pm

t-14orbust wrote:
DoubleChecks wrote:
hlsperson1111 wrote:I think I know exactly who you are talking about. FWIW, I am a terrible interviewer and it really hurt me come EIP (especially in converting CBs to offers). It's a learnable skill and my biggest piece of advice to all the 0Ls and 1Ls is that you should seriously work on it before EIP. Great interviewing will help you outperform your grades; bad interviewing will shut you out of firms where your grades are more than good enough.


Yeah, and I think being a strong, professional interviewer is just seen as a really big asset. I'm always so impressed by that 29/30 ratio -- it's so badass haha.


What makes a strong, professional interviewer exactly?

Hmm. It's more of an art than a science but it my mind it's the following:

being personable
thinking quick on your feet
reading social cues
staying calm
being self aware
a good voice
doing all the other stuff than you can control (ie research, dress correctly, be on time)

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DoubleChecks
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby DoubleChecks » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:08 pm

wert3813 wrote:
t-14orbust wrote:
DoubleChecks wrote:
hlsperson1111 wrote:I think I know exactly who you are talking about. FWIW, I am a terrible interviewer and it really hurt me come EIP (especially in converting CBs to offers). It's a learnable skill and my biggest piece of advice to all the 0Ls and 1Ls is that you should seriously work on it before EIP. Great interviewing will help you outperform your grades; bad interviewing will shut you out of firms where your grades are more than good enough.


Yeah, and I think being a strong, professional interviewer is just seen as a really big asset. I'm always so impressed by that 29/30 ratio -- it's so badass haha.


What makes a strong, professional interviewer exactly?

Hmm. It's more of an art than a science but it my mind it's the following:

being personable
thinking quick on your feet
reading social cues
staying calm
being self aware
a good voice
doing all the other stuff than you can control (ie research, dress correctly, be on time)


Right, all of the above and probably more. But listing it out isn't that helpful since a lot of it can't just simply be done. I mean, I guess it can be with a lot of practice and time. My incessant emphasis of being a "professional interviewer" is somewhat useless since, you're right, what does that really tell you? But I meant for it to remind people that professionalism, I've seen, trumps all. You don't have to be everyone's best buddy or come off as a genius. You just have to come off as professional. Easier said than done, but think of it as, the firm is looking for someone who will soon be a representative sample of the firm in the eyes of their clients. That's important.

When I interview potential summers, the three things that turn me off the most: 1) lack of preparation; 2) immaturity; and 3) arrogance. Tough thing about that is, besides #1, most people who are #2 and #3 don't know it...

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acrossthelake
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:23 pm

gottago wrote:any of you choose HLS over YLS because you thought it had a better social calendar and scene? Or is that just crazy talk?

I was talking to someone who chose Dartmouth over HUG for that reason. on the other hand I also spoke to someone who chose Dartmouth over state schools because Dartmouth was "better," but it was a poor fit socially

I will have visited both but HLS just seemed like a right fit when I visited in March. I walked into a social event a section was hosting randomly and met some people there.

There's also BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/HBS/etc.


I don't go to Yale so I can't comment on their social scene. But Harvard has been a good time and I'm pretty happy with the friendships I made here. I don't like everyone here, but I don't think i like everyone anywhere.

I will say that BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/etc. being nearby isn't really all that relevant. I have met absolutely nobody from any of these places over 3 years, and I'm fairly social. I've met people from HBS, nobody I'm in touch with or friends with. Interacted with MIT a bit, though. I guess if you make it your mission to break into a social circle there, you can, but there are so many people here that I don't know anybody who bothers. I guess it's relevant if you do online dating. I know someone dating a guy at either BU or BC law, forgot which, and another person dating someone at MIT.

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t-14orbust
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby t-14orbust » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:28 pm

DoubleChecks wrote:
wert3813 wrote:Hmm. It's more of an art than a science but it my mind it's the following:

being personable
thinking quick on your feet
reading social cues
staying calm
being self aware
a good voice
doing all the other stuff than you can control (ie research, dress correctly, be on time)


Right, all of the above and probably more. But listing it out isn't that helpful since a lot of it can't just simply be done. I mean, I guess it can be with a lot of practice and time. My incessant emphasis of being a "professional interviewer" is somewhat useless since, you're right, what does that really tell you? But I meant for it to remind people that professionalism, I've seen, trumps all. You don't have to be everyone's best buddy or come off as a genius. You just have to come off as professional. Easier said than done, but think of it as, the firm is looking for someone who will soon be a representative sample of the firm in the eyes of their clients. That's important.

When I interview potential summers, the three things that turn me off the most: 1) lack of preparation; 2) immaturity; and 3) arrogance. Tough thing about that is, besides #1, most people who are #2 and #3 don't know it...


Thanks for the responses brethren.

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wert3813
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:36 pm

So I'll shoot for a bit more practical advice which is how I think you can improve your interview skills during 1L. (Note: I'm not really advocating doing these things. Just if you really felt you needed to improve this is what I would do.)

Go to office hours and try to actually have a conversation (that includes course questions) instead of just popping off a few predetermined questions then jetting out. Most professors are happy with this. The ones who aren't you will know and even they won't be mean about it.

Practice telling your story/narrative in a way that is articulate and concise. I don't mean lie/brag/be aggressive towards your classmates. But you are going to meet like 500 new people this next year. Make sure you can articulate where you are from/interests/future plans/what you did b/w ls and undergrad, etc. in a way that is pleasant and brief.

Go to the firm receptions and actually talk to the lawyers. I know a lot of people say they don't find this helpful but I think it depends on your goals. If you are trying to get a job out of them? Not super helpful. If you are trying to learn more about the firm? Opinions are split but not awesome. Are you trying to learn how lawyers talk and talk like one? Incredibly helpful.

Do informational interviews for the same reason directly above.

If you can and are really nervous about it try to interview with a firm over Christmas break 1L or back on campus during 1L SIP (like a tiny tiny version of EIP). It will help you can get your confidence up.

Above all don't freak out. You are more than likely a perfectly fine interviewer.

Didn't have time to edit sorry for the typos that I'm sure are in this.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:54 pm

sjgonzalez3 wrote:
t-14orbust wrote:I've been thinking about JD/MPP at Kellogg (Kennedy?). Is it difficult to get into the MPP program? What benefits do you think it would give that aren't attainable through the JD alone? Thanks!!


Piggybacking off this question, if the benefits stem from the knowledge, rather than the degree itself (a question in and of itself), would taking selected courses at HKS be sufficient to obtain said benefits. Going one step further, might this approach only be sufficient for a,b,c career paths, but not x,y,z (where the MPP itself might be required/preferred/beneficial).

I've posted about this several times before in this thread, but I'll say this.

1. As for how difficult it is to get in, I don't know. You can apply simultaneously with an application to HLS, and you can also apply to one school from the first year of the other. I do know that reapplicants are viewed with some favor, so if you apply to both at once and don't get into HKS, you have a slightly higher chance on reapplication to HKS. Also, being in the Harvard family is viewed with favor, so if you're at HLS, you stand a better chance than if you were just applying from before law school. I can also say that HKS is a little more like business school in that your grades and test scores are less important and your resume is more important, compared to law school. But you should look at the HKS website (and, if you want, talk to HKS admissions) for more on what your chances are like.

2. As for the benefits, a lot of people who ask about this on TLS really want an answer in the form, "If you want to work in [x], then the diploma you need to purchase is a JD. If you want to work in [y], then the diplomas you need to purchase are JD and MPP. [etc]" It doesn't work that way. There's almost no job that requires an MPP specifically. I have (rarely, but not never) come across jobs that require either an MPP or a grad degree in Econ — the one that comes to mind is the California Legislative Analyst's Office (and maybe some jobs at the Federal Reserve or other regulators). But I've never come across a single job where the JD/MPP combination is particularly crucial as a recruiting standard (as in, "We only take JD/MPPs"). It's possible that it's the norm in something in D.C. — I've not spent time there so far, but there are a lot of JDs and a lot of MPPs there. (I've heard that it's useful, at least, for regulatory legal work in D.C.)

So what do you get? Well, you get an education. You get the core, which is loaded with econ and stats but also politics, political philosophy, management, etc. You also get greater access to the electives at HKS, the most popular of which you can't cross-register for, and — even of the ones you could cross-register for — you'll take more of them as a JD/MPP than as a cross-registrant. The elective classes are very different from law school classes; they have things like Negotiation Workshop — skill-building and experiential — but for tons of things: making speeches, writing op-eds, etc.

But, in addition, you get the experience of going to HKS. You get an extensive additional network, friends and fellow travelers in policy circles, which you can sort of get by cross-registering, but only sort of. This also includes the mid-careers and the alumni network, both of which are interesting contacts to have. You get more exposure to all the things that happen at HKS, like the Forums (which are fun) and the Institute of Politics and other centers (which are pretty remarkable, really), though you could get all of those things if you just walked down to HKS — but let's be real: you won't. You get a third summer, which can be useful if you want a broad range of internship experiences. You get to not be in law school for a little while, which — even for someone who likes law school a lot, as I do — is valuable for gaining perspective.

On the other side, it's another year of school that you have to do and go into debt for. To which I can only say, meh.

A common line from old JD/MPPs goes, "I got my job because of the JD, but I knew how to do my job because of the MPP." I think that's a fair summary. It's not for everyone — if you just want to take a couple of econ classes, or a couple of politics classes, or whatever, then you can just cross-register — but if you're interested in a deep dive into policy analysis and skill-building from every direction, it's a good experience.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:58 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
gottago wrote:any of you choose HLS over YLS because you thought it had a better social calendar and scene? Or is that just crazy talk?

I was talking to someone who chose Dartmouth over HUG for that reason. on the other hand I also spoke to someone who chose Dartmouth over state schools because Dartmouth was "better," but it was a poor fit socially

I will have visited both but HLS just seemed like a right fit when I visited in March. I walked into a social event a section was hosting randomly and met some people there.

There's also BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/HBS/etc.


I don't go to Yale so I can't comment on their social scene. But Harvard has been a good time and I'm pretty happy with the friendships I made here. I don't like everyone here, but I don't think i like everyone anywhere.

I will say that BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/etc. being nearby isn't really all that relevant. I have met absolutely nobody from any of these places over 3 years, and I'm fairly social. I've met people from HBS, nobody I'm in touch with or friends with. Interacted with MIT a bit, though. I guess if you make it your mission to break into a social circle there, you can, but there are so many people here that I don't know anybody who bothers. I guess it's relevant if you do online dating. I know someone dating a guy at either BU or BC law, forgot which, and another person dating someone at MIT.

There are, I think, cultural differences between Harvard and Yale, and I found fairly quickly that I am a lot more Harvard than I am Yale. If it feels like a good fit, it probably is.

There is at least one class (History of Legal Education) cross-listed with BC, so you can meet BC people if you really want. You can also cross-register with MIT Sloan, so you can meet MIT people if you want. There are a few people doing joint degrees with Fletcher at Tufts, so they'll be floating around. But you have to try a bit to break out of the HLS social scene if you want this to happen.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Mr. Elshal » Thu Apr 03, 2014 9:42 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
gottago wrote:any of you choose HLS over YLS because you thought it had a better social calendar and scene? Or is that just crazy talk?

I was talking to someone who chose Dartmouth over HUG for that reason. on the other hand I also spoke to someone who chose Dartmouth over state schools because Dartmouth was "better," but it was a poor fit socially

I will have visited both but HLS just seemed like a right fit when I visited in March. I walked into a social event a section was hosting randomly and met some people there.

There's also BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/HBS/etc.


I don't go to Yale so I can't comment on their social scene. But Harvard has been a good time and I'm pretty happy with the friendships I made here. I don't like everyone here, but I don't think i like everyone anywhere.

I will say that BU/BC/Wellesley/Tufts/etc. being nearby isn't really all that relevant. I have met absolutely nobody from any of these places over 3 years, and I'm fairly social. I've met people from HBS, nobody I'm in touch with or friends with. Interacted with MIT a bit, though. I guess if you make it your mission to break into a social circle there, you can, but there are so many people here that I don't know anybody who bothers. I guess it's relevant if you do online dating. I know someone dating a guy at either BU or BC law, forgot which, and another person dating someone at MIT.


As a counterpoint, I'm still a 1L and some of the best friends I've made here are at BU, BC, and MIT, in addition to the various schools of Harvard. I didn't go out seeking these people, because there are tons of great people at HLS, but I just kind of ran into them and hit it off. So it can play a major role in your social life even if you're not making any effort to find people from those schools.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Thu Apr 03, 2014 10:52 pm

I think this has been mentioned way back in the thread, but another thing to consider about the JD/MPP (or any joint degree) -- if you're looking to go into public service, look carefully at what LIPP will cover. The short answer: not much of your fourth year.

http://www.law.harvard.edu/current/sfs/ ... owing.html

"Up to $30,000 of combined undergraduate debt and debt incurred while pursuing an eligible joint degree with another Harvard graduate school is also eligible for LIPP coverage."

In other words, if your fourth year costs around $80k (tuition plus living expenses), you're on the hook for at least $50k of it with no assistance while you're making a public interest or government salary. Even more if you have any undergrad debt.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Fri Apr 04, 2014 12:14 am

That's basically correct, but 1) it's not your fourth year — if anything, it'd be your first or second year, but it's a little more complicated than that — and 2) HKS has its own (not very good) LRAP, along with a few scholarships.

I managed to set it up such that I won't owe anything to HKS when I graduate, only LIPP-eligible HLS debt (and not even exorbitant amounts of that). I managed it partly by being a Teaching Fellow for 3 years, and partly by working at a firm over one half of a split summer. It wasn't terribly hard to do, but not everyone will want to do it that way.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:51 am

Thanks for the extra info and sorry if I was unclear. Meant "fourth" as in "one more in addition to the 3 for the JD" not "it happens after you're done with the JD." I believe you have to apply by fall of 2L for the MPP and can't just add it on as a separate fourth year after 3L.

More info on the HKS equivalent of LIPP: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/degrees/sfs/learn-more/lrap

The income scale is less generous than LIPP, it's maxed at 5 years, and covers a much more limited range of employment.

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Postby 06162014123 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 10:01 am

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Last edited by 06162014123 on Mon Jun 09, 2014 12:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby lawschool2014hopeful » Fri Apr 04, 2014 10:21 am

Thanks for the very informative thread everyone!

I was wondering is there any other place to gather information on HLS besides this thread and HLS's official website? I am currently working on a LOCI as I am waitlisted but I found the website to be rather bare-boned in terms of information, compared to Columbia and Chicago.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tomwatts » Fri Apr 04, 2014 8:06 pm

RedShift wrote:tomwatts - I think you've hinted at this in previous posts, but do you think the MPP (or other joint degree) might be a hindrance for someone with typical biglaw/clerkship goals?

I really like the idea of a joint degree on an academic level. My career goals are still foggy, though, and it seems that maybe a second degree would make EIP interviewers skeptical.

The general answer is "No," but with a bunch of caveats.

For a clerkship, I seriously doubt that on balance it matters either way. Some judges might like it; some judges might not. I don't think there's any discernible trend, and I think it depends a little on how you pitch it anyway. I'm finding that the clerkship process is thoroughly inscrutable anyway.

For biglaw, it depends on how you play it. For a regulatory/political/government-type practice in DC, it's almost certainly an asset. Even if not, if your electives look relevant (e.g., a bunch of accounting/finance, and you tell firms you want to do corporate transactional work), then it's probably an asset, especially if you successfully do joint-degree EIP. Joint-degree EIP, as compared to 2L or 3L EIP, is an EIP that you can do with select firms to get a firm job for your second of three summers, a year before you'd do ordinary 2L EIP to get a firm job for your third of three summers. In the sequence 1L, MPP1, 2L, 3L, you'd do it right before your MPP1 year, whereas normal EIP is right before your 2L year. I think it's somewhat easier to get a firm job out of joint-degree EIP than for your 1L summer, although admittedly not by a huge amount.

For me, personally, my resume screamed "PUBLIC INTEREST!!" — partly because of the JD/MPP and partly for other reasons — and I maybe wasn't as aware of that as I should be. At one callback interview, after I'd given my usual answers about the sorts of things that I was interested in and why ("The stuff that this firm does, of course!" — but, like, phrased a little better), an interviewer literally began a question with, "Let's assume you're being disingenuous, and you actually want to do political work. I know that's not what you've said, but, for the sake of this question, let's just assume that you're not telling the whole truth." He proceeded to ask me something from there. Frankly, I was so flabbergasted that I gave what had to have been a pretty paltry response. Needless to say, I didn't get an offer from that firm.

But, and this is important, I did get a job, and it's — interestingly — what was probably my top choice all along. (I never actually put it in those terms, in order not to be disappointed if I didn't get it, but realistically, it was an remarkably good fit.) Of those of us who did EIP, I'm pretty sure the same is true for the others, too.

So you are going to have to deal with the apparent stereotype that all JD/MPPs just want to work on Capitol Hill, but, like any fairly dumb stereotype, it's not that hard to break through it if you are prepared. If you decide at the end of the day that you really just want to do general commercial litigation or M&A or whatever, you can do that. You might have to explain yourself a bit, but it's not hard.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby hls.burner » Fri Apr 04, 2014 11:26 pm

guys, this is an incredibly, incredibly useful thread. thanks so much for contributing. i was hoping you could help answer the following questions:

1. does applying as a 1L to HBS provide a significant admissions boost? for color, i'm specifically interested in an a field where both the JD and MBA would be helpful but my work experience (while above average on the TLS scale) is uncompetitive for HBS admission.

2. is there an explanation that reconciles the common theme in the thread that HLS grades are arbitrary and the empirical fact that Hs cluster around individuals? what separates the high-performers from the rest and is it possible to meaningfully predict my grades at HLS?

3. is it possible to RA as a 0L?

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 11:49 pm

1. I don't think it provides a significant boost. If you lack the quality work experience, it'll be tough to get in.

2. Grades aren't arbitrary. But you can't tell going in with any confidence (for the average student) how well you will do. I think sometimes people conflate the points.

3. Yes I believe so. Check out the administrative updates if you have access to that. The projects that you can work on are limited though I would think.
hls.burner wrote:guys, this is an incredibly, incredibly useful thread. thanks so much for contributing. i was hoping you could help answer the following questions:

1. does applying as a 1L to HBS provide a significant admissions boost? for color, i'm specifically interested in an a field where both the JD and MBA would be helpful but my work experience (while above average on the TLS scale) is uncompetitive for HBS admission.

2. is there an explanation that reconciles the common theme in the thread that HLS grades are arbitrary and the empirical fact that Hs cluster around individuals? what separates the high-performers from the rest and is it possible to meaningfully predict my grades at HLS?

3. is it possible to RA as a 0L?

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby TripTrip » Sat Apr 05, 2014 9:09 am

ph14 wrote: 2. Grades aren't arbitrary. But you can't tell going in with any confidence (for the average student) how well you will do. I think sometimes people conflate the points.

Some grades aren't arbitrary. There are definitely superior test takers who consistently woo professors. However, for the median of the pack, the distinction between low Hs and high Ps in each class is a little fuzzy. That last part makes grades look arbitrary to a lot of middle students.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby despina » Sat Apr 05, 2014 9:20 am

TripTrip wrote:Some grades aren't arbitrary. There are definitely superior test takers who consistently woo professors. However, for the median of the pack, the distinction between low Hs and high Ps in each class is a little fuzzy. That last part makes grades look arbitrary to a lot of middle students.


I think this is a good explanation. I would also add that different professors look for different things, so in that sense it's arbitrary that an exam that would definitely get an H from one prof would likely get a P from another. For example, in response to a long hypothetical "issue spotter," some professors are looking for you to "rack up points" by spotting as many issues as possible and giving short, clear explanations of how that issue is likely to come out. You'll do better if you spot 20 "easy" issues than if you give brilliant explanations for 10 "harder" ones. Other professors would be more impressed by an exam which focuses on just a few of the trickier issues and highlights policy concerns. Some profs would say "don't waste my time" with running with a totally "out there" issue that obviously wasn't intended to be posed by the hypo, while others love that. Most profs will tell you pretty straightforwardly what their approach is to this even if the exam instructions don't say. Some students maybe are better at adjusting their approach to exams to different professor styles.

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby wert3813 » Sat Apr 05, 2014 9:40 am

TripTrip wrote:
ph14 wrote: 2. Grades aren't arbitrary. But you can't tell going in with any confidence (for the average student) how well you will do. I think sometimes people conflate the points.

Some grades aren't arbitrary. There are definitely superior test takers who consistently woo professors. However, for the median of the pack, the distinction between low Hs and high Ps in each class is a little fuzzy. That last part makes grades look arbitrary to a lot of middle students.

Yep. Totally convinced the system does an accurate job of identifying the top 15% and the bottom 15%. I'm less sure about the 70% in the middle but for a variety of reasons that is much less important.

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Lovely Ludwig Van
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Lovely Ludwig Van » Sat Apr 05, 2014 4:07 pm

For 2Ls and 3Ls who've done the Quinn Emanuel thing, how do callbacks work? Is it if you get an email from one office asking for grades and resume, you have a shot at a callback, if you don't, you don't? Or can you initiate a follow-up without the office asking?

Thanks!

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Sat Apr 05, 2014 4:10 pm

Lovely Ludwig Van wrote:For 2Ls and 3Ls who've done the Quinn Emanuel thing, how do callbacks work? Is it if you get an email from one office asking for grades and resume, you have a shot at a callback, if you don't, you don't? Or can you initiate a follow-up without the office asking?

Thanks!


You apply on your own accord, before EIP. Then if they are interested you get a callback. The callback is a normal callback. Essentially, it's the normal process just skipping the 20-30 minute screening interview.

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Lovely Ludwig Van
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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Lovely Ludwig Van » Sat Apr 05, 2014 4:25 pm

ph14 wrote:
Lovely Ludwig Van wrote:For 2Ls and 3Ls who've done the Quinn Emanuel thing, how do callbacks work? Is it if you get an email from one office asking for grades and resume, you have a shot at a callback, if you don't, you don't? Or can you initiate a follow-up without the office asking?

Thanks!


You apply on your own accord, before EIP. Then if they are interested you get a callback. The callback is a normal callback. Essentially, it's the normal process just skipping the 20-30 minute screening interview.


Ahh, thanks. So the reception was mostly 'for show' then? They weren't actually taking down names as to who looks/sounds awkward vs. normal?

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Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby ph14 » Sat Apr 05, 2014 4:47 pm

Lovely Ludwig Van wrote:
ph14 wrote:
Lovely Ludwig Van wrote:For 2Ls and 3Ls who've done the Quinn Emanuel thing, how do callbacks work? Is it if you get an email from one office asking for grades and resume, you have a shot at a callback, if you don't, you don't? Or can you initiate a follow-up without the office asking?

Thanks!


You apply on your own accord, before EIP. Then if they are interested you get a callback. The callback is a normal callback. Essentially, it's the normal process just skipping the 20-30 minute screening interview.


Ahh, thanks. So the reception was mostly 'for show' then? They weren't actually taking down names as to who looks/sounds awkward vs. normal?


I mean I can't speak with any degree of certainty, but I know that people my year (class of 2014) got callbacks and offers without even attending the reception so.

lawschool2014hopeful
Posts: 554
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:48 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby lawschool2014hopeful » Sat Apr 05, 2014 5:10 pm

lawschool2014hopeful wrote:Thanks for the very informative thread everyone!

I was wondering is there any other place to gather information on HLS besides this thread and HLS's official website? I am currently working on a LOCI as I am waitlisted but I found the website to be rather bare-boned in terms of information, compared to Columbia and Chicago.



Sorry to be repeating the question, but it looks to be ignored.

Mind any one telling me if any other sources of information exist?




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