Canadian Resident taking questions.

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
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Noval
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Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:10 pm

I'm ready to answer your questions regarding Canadian Law Schools, job prospects, salaries,etc.

If you are interested in the Canadian Market, feel free to leave me your questions, i'll try my best to answer them.

dark
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby dark » Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:44 pm

I'm ignorant about this having done almost no research, but would there be any kind of summer job/post grad job opportunities for someone with a JD from a US law school? Or would that be a fairly useless credential to an employer north of the border?

-I recently got Canadian citizenship but am in the middle of a US lawschool curriculum.

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Knock
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Knock » Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:10 pm

Sorry, i'm kind of ignorant on Canadian Law. What are the top Canadians schools, and what are their medians?

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Sun Oct 24, 2010 8:04 pm

Knockglock wrote:Sorry, i'm kind of ignorant on Canadian Law. What are the top Canadians schools, and what are their medians?



The top schools are as follow:

1:UofT and McGill (It changes every year so both are considered top, UofT is good for Bay street hiring, McGill is good for both Bay St/International Hiring, even for U.S. firms.)
Those are the two bests in Canada, if you can get there, getting a BigLaw job will be a breeze.McGill costs a lot less for QC residents as Government covers most of the tuition, 3,900/year...

2:Osgoode hall from York University is also a great one even though campus is ugly as hell.Ranked 3rd best Law School in Canada, it has amazing employment prospects and the best "non-related" opportunities, many Canadian Investment Bankers or Management Consultants who did Law and re-oriented their career went there.

3:UBC is great too, good placement numbers.

4:University of Alberta is an amazing place if you want to focus on Energy Law since Oil is raining there and lots of firms focusing on the field recruit there.

5: UVic is not as bad as people may say, but it's not amazing either.

6: Western Ontario is also good, same as UVic regarding BigLaw hiring, which means decent for hard working students.

Canadian market is much more stable than the U.S. one, a student who got good grades from a no name school can still break in biglaw in local market, quick example: University of Montreal have amazing placement rates to MTL Biglaw .
Last edited by Noval on Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Sun Oct 24, 2010 8:09 pm

dark wrote:I'm ignorant about this having done almost no research, but would there be any kind of summer job/post grad job opportunities for someone with a JD from a US law school? Or would that be a fairly useless credential to an employer north of the border?

-I recently got Canadian citizenship but am in the middle of a US lawschool curriculum.


Depends what school you're from, if it's a T14, you'll have decent chances to compete for BigLaw, Canadian firms prefer Canadian grads and if you don't have something better to offer, they will simply not hire you.

You'll be able to practice everywhere except Quebec, where Civil Law is dominating there.

Summer jobs are often given to Law students so you'll have to aim for full time positions by networking as much as you can or do a one year certificate in a well known Canadian Law school to "boost your chances" and get used to the Canadian system.

If you already have several years of experience, getting into in-house counsel might be even easier for you.

Renzo
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Renzo » Sun Oct 24, 2010 8:14 pm

Is it true that in Canada during winter all lifeforms freeze solid in some form of suspended animation, only to thaw and resume life come spring?

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:23 pm

Renzo wrote:Is it true that in Canada during winter all lifeforms freeze solid in some form of suspended animation, only to thaw and resume life come spring?


Not really... In winter everything becomes glamour, especially in christmas time when parties are going on.
Vancouver is expensive for nothing, Toronto is good but i've seen better, Montreal is awesome but taxes are high, Calgary is awesome too but if you don't like being surrounded by conservative retards all day long, you may not like it, same for Edmonton, Alberta is full of douchebags ( Oil Law firms = Regroups the people with the most malignant personalities and most horrendous egos but money is raining, be prepared for a lot of competition and backstabbing if you decide to work there. )
Halifax is in the middle of no where, just like any maritime city in Canada.
Quebec city is good, but it's full of racists, full of french language nazi-lunatics who start insulting you because you said a word in English...

Summer is awesome everywhere though, not too cold outside that season, too many stereotypes surrounding Canada, i'm still waiting for the questions such as " Do you guys live in igloos ? " or " Why the FUCK would you put milk in plastic bags ? "

Renzo
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Renzo » Tue Oct 26, 2010 10:21 pm

Noval wrote: i'm still waiting for the questions such as " Do you guys live in igloos ? " or " Why the FUCK would you put milk in plastic bags ? "

Who cares about milk in plastic jugs; let's talk about why your police have to wear fur hats and ride around on caribou!

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Fred_McGriff
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Fred_McGriff » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:02 pm

What do you think of Stomin' Tom Connors?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxIJPMVHBDk

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niederbomb
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby niederbomb » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:20 pm

Everyone knows that it's much easier to get high grades in the USA than it is in Canadian UG, so I'm wondering how and to what extent the adcomms take this into account when comparing applicants.

I'm applying to U of T with a 3.92 LSAC GPA from a small liberal arts college in the USA whose UG is not nationally ranked in USNWR (but it's MBA program is T1). I haven't gotten my OLSAS GPA calculation yet, so it might change. Do you think UG school reputation plays a role in admissions decisions?

How do you think my job prospects in Toronto would compare to my job prospects in New York or Chicago with a JD from a lower top-10 U.S. law school like Berkeley, Michigan, or Virginia?

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:46 pm

niederbomb wrote:Everyone knows that it's much easier to get high grades in the USA than it is in Canadian UG, so I'm wondering how and to what extent the adcomms take this into account when comparing applicants.

I'm applying to U of T with a 3.92 LSAC GPA from a small liberal arts college in the USA whose UG is not nationally ranked in USNWR (but it's MBA program is T1). I haven't gotten my OLSAS GPA calculation yet, so it might change. Do you think UG school reputation plays a role in admissions decisions?

How do you think my job prospects in Toronto would compare to my job prospects in New York or Chicago with a JD from a lower top-10 U.S. law school like Berkeley, Michigan, or Virginia?


Yes, U.S. UG is indeed easier than in Canada, but they obviously don't care since it's just UG...
If you did UG at a well known University, consider it a plus.Let's say that they will remember you easier if you did UG at i.e., MIT, where selection rate is 11-13% for it's UG Programs than if you did a Bachelor of Arts at University of Wyoming.

From a lower top-14 Law School, it should be acceptable to get an interview, you'll have to do well from there and convince the Partners that you have what it takes to practice in Bay Street.

They will ask themselves 2 main questions:

1-Is this guy tough enough to do BigLaw ?
2-Do i like him ?

The second question is far more important than the first one, it may be the one that will give you an offer so don't screw up on this one, don't be a douchebag, but don't be anti-social either.If you have no previous BigLaw experience, you'll have to do well on the first question as well.

I know a few T-14 Friends practicing on Bay Street and they got there with massive networking and decent records like yours.

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niederbomb
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby niederbomb » Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:21 pm

Noval wrote:

niederbomb wrote:
Everyone knows that it's much easier to get high grades in the USA than it is in Canadian UG, so I'm wondering how and to what extent the adcomms take this into account when comparing applicants.

I'm applying to U of T with a 3.92 LSAC GPA from a small liberal arts college in the USA whose UG is not nationally ranked in USNWR (but it's MBA program is T1). I haven't gotten my OLSAS GPA calculation yet, so it might change. Do you think UG school reputation plays a role in admissions decisions?

How do you think my job prospects in Toronto would compare to my job prospects in New York or Chicago with a JD from a lower top-10 U.S. law school like Berkeley, Michigan, or Virginia?


Yes, U.S. UG is indeed easier than in Canada, but they obviously don't care since it's just UG...
If you did UG at a well known University, consider it a plus.Let's say that they will remember you easier if you did UG at i.e., MIT, where selection rate is 11-13% for it's UG Programs than if you did a Bachelor of Arts at University of Wyoming.

From a lower top-14 Law School, it should be acceptable to get an interview, you'll have to do well from there and convince the Partners that you have what it takes to practice in Bay Street.

They will ask themselves 2 main questions:

1-Is this guy tough enough to do BigLaw ?
2-Do i like him ?

The second question is far more important than the first one, it may be the one that will give you an offer so don't screw up on this one, don't be a douchebag, but don't be anti-social either.If you have no previous BigLaw experience, you'll have to do well on the first question as well.

I know a few T-14 Friends practicing on Bay Street and they got there with massive networking and decent records like yours.


Sorry, I think you misunderstood. What I mean is: Would my job prospects in Toronto be as good with a U of T degree as my job prospects in NYC or Chicago would be with a U.S. lower T14 law degree?

I wouldn't go to a T14 unless I planned to practice in the USA, and likewise, I would go to U of T only with the purpose of practicing law in Canada.

I am not Canadian, though I have visited Toronto many times. I have heard from multiple sources that Canada's legal market is in far better shape than the U.S's. So that, as well as some personal reasons, is why I'm applying.

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:11 pm

niederbomb wrote:Noval wrote:

niederbomb wrote:
Everyone knows that it's much easier to get high grades in the USA than it is in Canadian UG, so I'm wondering how and to what extent the adcomms take this into account when comparing applicants.

I'm applying to U of T with a 3.92 LSAC GPA from a small liberal arts college in the USA whose UG is not nationally ranked in USNWR (but it's MBA program is T1). I haven't gotten my OLSAS GPA calculation yet, so it might change. Do you think UG school reputation plays a role in admissions decisions?

How do you think my job prospects in Toronto would compare to my job prospects in New York or Chicago with a JD from a lower top-10 U.S. law school like Berkeley, Michigan, or Virginia?


Yes, U.S. UG is indeed easier than in Canada, but they obviously don't care since it's just UG...
If you did UG at a well known University, consider it a plus.Let's say that they will remember you easier if you did UG at i.e., MIT, where selection rate is 11-13% for it's UG Programs than if you did a Bachelor of Arts at University of Wyoming.

From a lower top-14 Law School, it should be acceptable to get an interview, you'll have to do well from there and convince the Partners that you have what it takes to practice in Bay Street.

They will ask themselves 2 main questions:

1-Is this guy tough enough to do BigLaw ?
2-Do i like him ?

The second question is far more important than the first one, it may be the one that will give you an offer so don't screw up on this one, don't be a douchebag, but don't be anti-social either.If you have no previous BigLaw experience, you'll have to do well on the first question as well.

I know a few T-14 Friends practicing on Bay Street and they got there with massive networking and decent records like yours.


Sorry, I think you misunderstood. What I mean is: Would my job prospects in Toronto be as good with a U of T degree as my job prospects in NYC or Chicago would be with a U.S. lower T14 law degree?

I wouldn't go to a T14 unless I planned to practice in the USA, and likewise, I would go to U of T only with the purpose of practicing law in Canada.

I am not Canadian, though I have visited Toronto many times. I have heard from multiple sources that Canada's legal market is in far better shape than the U.S's. So that, as well as some personal reasons, is why I'm applying.



My mistake sir, you have good chances on both sides, take the less expensive option. Keep in mind that you'll have to prove yourself more with a T-14 degree if you want to work in Bay Street.

serdog
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby serdog » Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:33 pm

Noval wrote:

My mistake sir, you have good chances on both sides, take the less expensive option. Keep in mind that you'll have to prove yourself more with a T-14 degree if you want to work in Bay Street.

It easier to work on wall street with a Canadian JD then Bay street with a US JD (You can take the Bar with a Canadain JD in New York you have to go though accreditation in Canada that can take up to 3 years)

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niederbomb
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby niederbomb » Sat Oct 30, 2010 11:04 am

I seriously bombed in the LSAT in the low 160's. So HYSCCN are probably out even if I get 180 in December, making Canadian schools a whole lot more attractive to me at this point.

I can probably get into UBC with my current stats while I wait for December...Unlike Osgoode in Toronto, UBC doesn't seem to have much competition in Vancouver.

What would be my job prospects in Vancouver coming out of UBC? I don't need to make $200,000 per year, but $100,000 private sector or PI options would be nice. Besides Macleans...where can I find out more?

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Sat Oct 30, 2010 2:39 pm

serdog wrote:
Noval wrote:

My mistake sir, you have good chances on both sides, take the less expensive option. Keep in mind that you'll have to prove yourself more with a T-14 degree if you want to work in Bay Street.

It easier to work on wall street with a Canadian JD then Bay street with a US JD (You can take the Bar with a Canadain JD in New York you have to go though accreditation in Canada that can take up to 3 years)



Not really, 99% of Wall Street Attorneys are In-House, BigLaw experience is a pre-requisite to land a job there...

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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby lilliea » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:28 pm

I'm particularly interested in working either in Asia or having close connections with Asia once I'm done with law school. Since there are particularly large Asian communities in a number of Canadian cities, would you suppose that Canadian law schools have better connections to Asia?

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Sun Oct 31, 2010 6:02 pm

lilliea wrote:I'm particularly interested in working either in Asia or having close connections with Asia once I'm done with law school. Since there are particularly large Asian communities in a number of Canadian cities, would you suppose that Canadian law schools have better connections to Asia?



McGill University is your best bet, many big firms based in Asia recruit there, but you'll have to be fluent in both English and the concerned asian language like Japanese, Chinese etc.
Asian communities don't matter, it's the recruiting at top schools that will land you in an Asian office, McGill grads get offers from many European/Asian/American firms while UofT grads do not have the same International mobility as McGill grads.

If there are Asian firms doing on-campus interviews and recruit in U.S. Law schools, go there instead.

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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby niederbomb » Mon Nov 01, 2010 3:29 am

lilliea wrote:
I'm particularly interested in working either in Asia or having close connections with Asia once I'm done with law school. Since there are particularly large Asian communities in a number of Canadian cities, would you suppose that Canadian law schools have better connections to Asia?



McGill University is your best bet, many big firms based in Asia recruit there, but you'll have to be fluent in both English and the concerned asian language like Japanese, Chinese etc.
Asian communities don't matter, it's the recruiting at top schools that will land you in an Asian office, McGill grads get offers from many European/Asian/American firms while UofT grads do not have the same International mobility as McGill grads.


I am interested in doing this as well, and I do speak Chinese from living in China for a year.

I am applying to UofT and UBC, but maybe I should go to McGill instead? I thought UofT Faculty of Law was Canada's flagship school.

Only problem...McGill has a French requirement. So I'd have to delay a year, so I could take some French.

EDIT: I've googled for hours and cannot find a list of OCI firms for either UBC, UT, or McGill. Any idea where I could find this information?

Someone on the lawstudents.ca board said UBC was the best "Asian law" school, so I'd like to actually get some hard numbers.

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lilliea
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby lilliea » Mon Nov 01, 2010 9:49 am

niederbomb wrote:
I am interested in doing this as well, and I do speak Chinese from living in China for a year.

I am applying to UofT and UBC, but maybe I should go to McGill instead? I thought UofT Faculty of Law was Canada's flagship school.

Only problem...McGill has a French requirement. So I'd have to delay a year, so I could take some French.

EDIT: I've googled for hours and cannot find a list of OCI firms for either UBC, UT, or McGill. Any idea where I could find this information?

Someone on the lawstudents.ca board said UBC was the best "Asian law" school, so I'd like to actually get some hard numbers.


+1 I missed out on the deadline for UofT, but I'm also interested in UBC as well. Any information you might have about it would be great.

Also, how heavy is French, honestly, in the McGill curriculum?

Niederbomb: Where did you spend your year in China, if you don't mind me asking? I got back from Chengdu in May.

8idl
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby 8idl » Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:28 am

Hi, I just received my LSAT score and I was wondering if you could evaluate my chances at UT law?

OLSAS cGPA: 3.87
1st year: 3.82
2nd year: 3.92

LSAT: 165/92nd

I'm currently on a full year exchange for my 3rd year so my OLSAS cGPA won't change between now and when I apply in Sep 2011.

Thanks so much!

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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby niederbomb » Mon Nov 01, 2010 11:14 am

lilliea wrote:

+1 I missed out on the deadline for UofT, but I'm also interested in UBC as well. Any information you might have about it would be great.


No you didn't. You still have about 12 hours to finish it, before 11:59 PM on November 1 EST. It's now 11:14 PM in China. :P

Also, how heavy is French, honestly, in the McGill curriculum?


Apparently, you have to be able to read it, but not necessarily speak it well. However, if they think your French might be deficient, they call you and try to interview in French. I know practically zero, so if I go there, I will have to take some French and apply next cycle.

Niederbomb: Where did you spend your year in China, if you don't mind me asking? I got back from Chengdu in May.


I spent the summer in Dalian taking a Chinese course and working for a shipping company. When they couldn't get me a visa, I moved to Shenyang to work for an American NGO that helps Chinese high-school students go to university abroad.

Translation: I'm just another ordinary English teacher who happens to teach exclusively TOEFL and SAT English. I finish my contract in August. How do you like Chengdu?

firemed
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby firemed » Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:37 pm

Noval wrote:I'm ready to answer your questions regarding Canadian Law Schools, job prospects, salaries,etc.

If you are interested in the Canadian Market, feel free to leave me your questions, i'll try my best to answer them.



I have already applied to UVic, UBC, U of A, U of C, Dal, Queens, Osgoode, and Windsor.

I have heard many times that an LLB/JD there is much more portable than it is here in the States... in the sense that one can move around within Canada relatively easily as a lawyer.

What is your opinion... true, not true?

serdog
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby serdog » Mon Nov 01, 2010 8:43 pm

lilliea wrote:I'm particularly interested in working either in Asia or having close connections with Asia once I'm done with law school. Since there are particularly large Asian communities in a number of Canadian cities, would you suppose that Canadian law schools have better connections to Asia?

look at UBC, there specialty is Asia Pacific law

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Noval
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Re: Canadian Resident taking questions.

Postby Noval » Mon Nov 01, 2010 9:26 pm

niederbomb wrote:
lilliea wrote:
I'm particularly interested in working either in Asia or having close connections with Asia once I'm done with law school. Since there are particularly large Asian communities in a number of Canadian cities, would you suppose that Canadian law schools have better connections to Asia?



McGill University is your best bet, many big firms based in Asia recruit there, but you'll have to be fluent in both English and the concerned asian language like Japanese, Chinese etc.
Asian communities don't matter, it's the recruiting at top schools that will land you in an Asian office, McGill grads get offers from many European/Asian/American firms while UofT grads do not have the same International mobility as McGill grads.


I am interested in doing this as well, and I do speak Chinese from living in China for a year.

I am applying to UofT and UBC, but maybe I should go to McGill instead? I thought UofT Faculty of Law was Canada's flagship school.

Only problem...McGill has a French requirement. So I'd have to delay a year, so I could take some French.

EDIT: I've googled for hours and cannot find a list of OCI firms for either UBC, UT, or McGill. Any idea where I could find this information?

Someone on the lawstudents.ca board said UBC was the best "Asian law" school, so I'd like to actually get some hard numbers.


UofT is your best choice if you want a decent shot pretty much everywhere, but for the International scene, McGill is the only Canadian University viewed with esteem, the French requirement is "medium" as you will study in a transsystemic environment, you will have to understand both Civil and Common Law equally and be able to deal with every case related to them.That said, you will only need to learn how to read/write decent French to get accepted there.There are French courses in McGill and lots of Law aspirants go there before getting admitted.It takes a few months to be able to learn French and trust me, if you have the brain to enter either UofT or McGill, you're smart enough to learn French fast.

Yes, UBC Law is known to hold to highest amount of Asians, but this won't affect your chances in Asian markets as almost no firm outside Canada knows about UBC.
Many of the contacts i know who studied there told me that the Law student community is really poor there, shock full of idealistic douchebags who consider themselves better than others and the Asian community gave it a bad name as lots of them are trouble makers in that School (No offense.).




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