Non case-study method law school

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
User avatar
Veyron
Posts: 3598
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:50 am

Non case-study method law school

Postby Veyron » Fri Sep 17, 2010 7:27 pm

Anyone ever tried to start one of these? With all of the TTTs opening daily, you would think that it has at least been tried.

Black-Blue
Posts: 279
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:46 pm

Re: Non case-study method law school

Postby Black-Blue » Fri Sep 17, 2010 9:14 pm

The current system has actually relaxed quite a bit from traditional exclusive case study. Some classes that focus on statutory rules no longer emphasize case studies.

User avatar
Veyron
Posts: 3598
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:50 am

Re: Non case-study method law school

Postby Veyron » Fri Sep 17, 2010 9:17 pm

Black-Blue wrote:The current system has actually relaxed quite a bit from traditional exclusive case study. Some classes that focus on statutory rules no longer emphasize case studies.


Yes, truly a travesty but has anyone tried to educate lawyers based on pre-Langdell methods?

User avatar
nealric
Posts: 2391
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:53 am

Re: Non case-study method law school

Postby nealric » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:34 am

I've talked to students at 4th tier schools who literally get credit for bar prep courses (mostly doing MBE drills). I doubt much serious case studying is going on in schools like that. Also, many upper-division classes in more technical subjects get away from the case method. For example, my tax LLM classes aren't really case method based. Most of the assigned reading is focused on the tax code and its supporting regulations. They will throw in a few cases where the regs and case law conflict or where there is genuine uncertainty, but we aren't usually learning the law from the cases.

My take on the case study method is that it has some value, but shouldn't be used exclusively. Being able to figure out the state of the law based on cases is an essential skill for lawyers, but it's also a relatively inefficient method for learning well-established law.




Return to “Ask a Law Student / Graduate”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests