Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

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Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Apr 23, 2013 10:51 pm

Top of the class 1L at a T20. HYPS undergrad. Great/interesting pre-law resume. I have seen the other threads about getting a clerkship as a transfer being more difficult because of faculty relationships etc.

1. Am I more likely to get a feeder clerkship by transferring to HYS or by staying put and trying to graduate in the top few here, hit LR e-board, publish, etc etc?

2. Does anyone know of a transfer that was able to get a feeder COA clerkship?

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby sideoffries » Tue Apr 23, 2013 11:01 pm

Here is an example of a transfer (Texas to Yale) getting feeder clerkship then SCOTUS
http://law.missouri.edu/faculty/directo ... eye-cv.pdf

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:05 am

1. At some point, you're not particularly likely to get a feeder clerkship either way--by their nature, they're unlikely. A friend of mine is first in his class at a T20 and will be clerking for a top-10 feeder. There's a lot in favor of that approach. Being first in your class, you'll get a lot of institutional weight behind you. And you'll get great recommendations. And you don't have to transfer, which can be tough.

2. I do know of someone who transferred from a T25 to HYS and will be clerking for a top-5 feeder. So it is possible. I imagine it is slightly more difficult to distinguish yourself quickly enough to get the needed recommendations (especially with hiring getting earlier and earlier), but it can be done.

A lot of it comes down to how much money you're getting at your current school, whether you can get more, and how strong your ties to your current school are.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:26 am

Anonymous User wrote:Top of the class 1L at a T20. HYPS undergrad. Great/interesting pre-law resume. I have seen the other threads about getting a clerkship as a transfer being more difficult because of faculty relationships etc.

1. Am I more likely to get a feeder clerkship by transferring to HYS or by staying put and trying to graduate in the top few here, hit LR e-board, publish, etc etc?

2. Does anyone know of a transfer that was able to get a feeder COA clerkship?


With a great/interesting pre-law resume from Stanford, you'd think you could do better than T20 unless there was something else holding you up... so maybe its better to stay at an institution at which you can excel?

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby ndirish2010 » Wed Apr 24, 2013 11:56 am

Depends on which T20 and what kind of professor relationships you have. At some T20/T25 schools, the top 2-3 kids routinely are competitive for feeders...I would just look back at your school's history to see what kind of professor pipelines you guys have.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:28 pm

Thanks everyone. That's helpful.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:34 pm

FWIW, I know that 2L transfers into my (HYS) school have been having a much harder time getting COA clerkships in general than similarly positioned non-transfer students. But this year has been rough for a number of different reasons (primarily the fact that judges started moving much earlier this year giving transfers less time to nail down the critical professor recommendations).

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Tangerine Gleam » Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:45 pm

It's a tough call. I think transferring is a bit risky. I know of a good handful of people who (anectodally) have gone from #1 or #2 in their class at School 1 to top 15-20% at School 2. I also know some who have stayed near the very top.

I'm not at HYS, but to have a good shot at feeders from those schools, I assume you'd have to be in the top 5% or so after your 2L year, which could be much more challenging at HYS. And 2L/3L doctrinal classes tend to be, in my opinion, harder to do well in. But I'm sure many people will feel differently.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:03 pm

Tangerine Gleam wrote:It's a tough call. I think transferring is a bit risky. I know of a good handful of people who (anectodally) have gone from #1 or #2 in their class at School 1 to top 15-20% at School 2. I also know some who have stayed near the very top.

I'm not at HYS, but to have a good shot at feeders from those schools, I assume you'd have to be in the top 5% or so after your 2L year, which could be much more challenging at HYS. And 2L/3L doctrinal classes tend to be, in my opinion, harder to do well in. But I'm sure many people will feel differently.


[I'm the anon who posted directly above TG]

It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:40 pm

Anonymous User wrote:FWIW, I know that 2L transfers into my (HYS) school have been having a much harder time getting COA clerkships in general than similarly positioned non-transfer students. But this year has been rough for a number of different reasons (primarily the fact that judges started moving much earlier this year giving transfers less time to nail down the critical professor recommendations).


Plus, for most schools, transferring either takes you out of the running for law review or makes it significantly more difficult to write on. Most of the people who clerk for feeder judges are on law review, but certainly not all.[/quote]

Anonymous User wrote:[I'm the anon who posted directly above TG]

It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I'm at HYS and I think that it is probably roughly like this: (1) Grades. (2) Law Review. (3) Faculty Recommendations. (4) Everything else.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:48 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put.


DING DING DING DING DING

I was at the very top of my class at a Top 30 law school that has almost never placed students with feeders. I applied to many of them way early, had great recommendations and professors with personal connections on the phone (although not the every-year-send-a-clerk-to-chambers connections common at HYS and to a lesser extent T14) and got nary an interview. I ended up with a great COA clerkship in a major secondary city in the schools geographic area. If you really want a feeder (and you should ask yourself carefully if and why you want that) you are better off transferring unless your school has a track record of placing clerks with feeders. It is extremely unlikely that a feeder is going to take you as his first clerk from your school.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:52 pm

Anonymous User wrote:[I'm the anon who posted directly above TG]

It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I'm at HYS and I think that it is probably roughly like this: (1) Grades. (2) Law Review. (3) Faculty Recommendations. (4) Everything else.

Perhaps, but there is a great deal of multicollinearity between grades and faculty recommendations at clerkship powerhouse schools like HYS. That is, if you have great grades you are likely to end up with great faculty recommendations. But I would actually argue faculty recommendations (particularly personal contact from influential professors to judges) is actually more important to getting the job than grades, assuming you meet a baseline qualification grades-wise.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:58 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put.


DING DING DING DING DING

I was at the very top of my class at a Top 30 law school that has almost never placed students with feeders. I applied to many of them way early, had great recommendations and professors with personal connections on the phone (although not the every-year-send-a-clerk-to-chambers connections common at HYS and to a lesser extent T14) and got nary an interview. I ended up with a great COA clerkship in a major secondary city in the schools geographic area. If you really want a feeder (and you should ask yourself carefully if and why you want that) you are better off transferring unless your school has a track record of placing clerks with feeders. It is extremely unlikely that a feeder is going to take you as his first clerk from your school.


I agree with this. Check on your school's history. I almost transferred to one of HYS, but decided to stay put at UT/UCLA/Vandy and i'll be clerking for a Judge that places 1 clerk on the Court each year. Not a massive feeder, but the Judge is amazing and awesome, and I think it's better than I would have gotten out of HYS with only 1 semester of grades (hired in spring of 2L) and limited faculty relationships.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:59 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:[I'm the anon who posted directly above TG]

It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I'm at HYS and I think that it is probably roughly like this: (1) Grades. (2) Law Review. (3) Faculty Recommendations. (4) Everything else.

Perhaps, but there is a great deal of multicollinearity between grades and faculty recommendations at clerkship powerhouse schools like HYS. That is, if you have great grades you are likely to end up with great faculty recommendations. But I would actually argue faculty recommendations (particularly personal contact from influential professors to judges) is actually more important to getting the job than grades, assuming you meet a baseline qualification grades-wise.


Maybe if your faculty recommender is Laurence Tribe, Cass Sunstein, or Martha Minow, or someone the judge knows really well. But otherwise I think that faculty recommendations are good for getting your foot in the door but not necessarily for getting you the offer. I do agree that a lot of the people with good grades/law review end up having better faculty recommendations though, for a few reasons.

Are you at a HYS, and have you been through the clerkship application process?

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 3:17 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I clerk for a "feeder" and review applications. The above analysis is largely correct, though (1) and (2) are ahead by a mile and (3) and (4) could be reversed. High grades (typically top 5% at a school with real grades; no more than 2 or 3 Passes at HYS) are necessary but not sufficient; it is the personal recommendation of a trusted professor or a particularly interesting record (e.g., Navy SEAL) that usually triggers an interview. Law Review is expected but its absence may be excused for good cause.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 3:29 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I clerk for a "feeder" and review applications. The above analysis is largely correct, though (1) and (2) are ahead by a mile and (3) and (4) could be reversed. High grades (typically top 5% at a school with real grades; no more than 2 or 3 Passes at HYS) are necessary but not sufficient; it is the personal recommendation of a trusted professor or a particularly interesting record (e.g., Navy SEAL) that usually triggers an interview. Law Review is expected but its absence may be excused for good cause.


When you say no more than 2-3 passes, do you mean net passes? That is, after book prizes/dean's scholars, etc. Or just no more than 2-3 at all.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 3:44 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Perhaps, but there is a great deal of multicollinearity between grades and faculty recommendations at clerkship powerhouse schools like HYS. That is, if you have great grades you are likely to end up with great faculty recommendations. But I would actually argue faculty recommendations (particularly personal contact from influential professors to judges) is actually more important to getting the job than grades, assuming you meet a baseline qualification grades-wise.


Maybe if your faculty recommender is Laurence Tribe, Cass Sunstein, or Martha Minow, or someone the judge knows really well. But otherwise I think that faculty recommendations are good for getting your foot in the door but not necessarily for getting you the offer. I do agree that a lot of the people with good grades/law review end up having better faculty recommendations though, for a few reasons.

Are you at a HYS, and have you been through the clerkship application process?


[Different HYS student with a good but non-feeder COA clerkship]

Getting recommendations from somebody very famous and/or somebody who the judge knows really well is an important step in the process from schools like HYS with our strange grading systems and wealth of famous, well-connected professors (Think about your examples: Tribe, Sunstein, and Minnow probably each recommend a number of Harvard students each year - and their recommendation is going to carry a lot of weight with judges who they know). There just aren't that many feeder clerkships available.

Obviously, the interview has to go well, but, I'm 90% sure that having my (famous and well-connected) recommender call the judge and say good things about me was the key to securing my clerkship. In fact, the judge essentially told me as much, repeatedly mentioning the good things that the prof. had said about me the during our interview. I can't run a counterfactual and surmise about what would have happened if the prof. hadn't called (perhaps I'd still have gotten the job), but it obviously helped a lot. And this was not for one of the more competitive judges.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:26 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
It seems like at my HYS school feeder clerkships are not about being a "top" student in terms of grades (though your H/P ratio needs to be skewed towards the Hs). The factors, in order of importance, seem to be:

1) Direct connections to chambers. Taking a class from a judge, knowing current clerks, knowing the judge's friends and colleagues by, for example, working over summer with the judge's spouse/kid/friend.

2) Calls from specifically influential professors. The professor's influence varies with the judge.

3) Journal/Org. work. Are you EIC of the law review or president of ACS or Fedsoc?

4) Course selection. Admin and FedCourts helps. Law and the Russian Novel doesn't.

All of these factors, with the exception of course selection, are harder for transfer students to accomplish because they're a year behind on the networking.

I don't know what school the OP is at, but if it's a school that regularly places top students into feeder clerkships, then I suspect that it's easier to get a feeder clerkship by staying put. If it's a school that does not, the transfer might help. But the process is so idiosyncratic and luck plays such a significant role that I wouldn't ever suggest transferring simply to increase the chances of a feeder clerkship. It might make sense if the goal was a COA clerkships in general, but the feeder jobs are just too small in number to make the bet reasonable.

This advice should also be taken with a grain of salt and are just observations from somebody outside the process. I knew that my grades and course selection weren't par for a feeder judge so instead of trying for that I targeted (and got) a COA clerkship with a judge whose work I respect in a less competitive circuit (6/8/10).


I clerk for a "feeder" and review applications. The above analysis is largely correct, though (1) and (2) are ahead by a mile and (3) and (4) could be reversed. High grades (typically top 5% at a school with real grades; no more than 2 or 3 Passes at HYS) are necessary but not sufficient; it is the personal recommendation of a trusted professor or a particularly interesting record (e.g., Navy SEAL) that usually triggers an interview. Law Review is expected but its absence may be excused for good cause.


When you say no more than 2-3 passes, do you mean net passes? That is, after book prizes/dean's scholars, etc. Or just no more than 2-3 at all.


No more than 2-3 period (assuming the applicant is a 2L). "Net" grades are somewhat misleading because a very high grade in one class does not really "cancel out" a very poor grade in another; all H's is preferable to six DS'es and six P's. (This, of course, is why we ask for a transcript and not merely the GPA.)

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby lolwat » Fri Apr 26, 2013 8:05 am

It's early and I have to head off to work soon, so I'm not sure if anyone's said this since the thread got kinda derailed into talking about HYS professors and the like, but:

Not all T20s are created equal, so do some research. My T20 is terrible at clerkship placements, particularly outside of the region that we're in (we try, and I think this year was better than a few previous, at least). I don't think we've had anyone get a feeder clerkship in the 3 years I've been there + the 2 years since I've graduated. At least not a major feeder, maybe someone that's placed a couple clerks on SCOTUS throughout their tenure as judges. I also know that we haven't had a SCOTUS clerk from our school since . . . . well, a long time ago.

If you were at my school I'd say transferring will probably be beneficial in every way possible.

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Citizen Genet » Fri Apr 26, 2013 8:27 am

lolwat wrote:It's early and I have to head off to work soon, so I'm not sure if anyone's said this since the thread got kinda derailed into talking about HYS professors and the like, but:

Not all T20s are created equal, so do some research. My T20 is terrible at clerkship placements, particularly outside of the region that we're in (we try, and I think this year was better than a few previous, at least). I don't think we've had anyone get a feeder clerkship in the 3 years I've been there + the 2 years since I've graduated. At least not a major feeder, maybe someone that's placed a couple clerks on SCOTUS throughout their tenure as judges. I also know that we haven't had a SCOTUS clerk from our school since . . . . well, a long time ago.

If you were at my school I'd say transferring will probably be beneficial in every way possible.


In that range, I've heard that Vanderbilt punches above its weight pretty routinely. UT has good Southern placement. USC/UCLA dominate federal district courts in California, get onto the 9th pretty well, and then have a tougher time going back west. Haven't heard anything specific about WUSTL (leading me to believe it doesn't do great) and Minnesota (other than that they had a single Supreme Court clerk a couple years back which means there is likely SOME high profile connection, but it probably isn't reliable enough to count on.)

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Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:21 am

Citizen Genet wrote:
lolwat wrote:It's early and I have to head off to work soon, so I'm not sure if anyone's said this since the thread got kinda derailed into talking about HYS professors and the like, but:

Not all T20s are created equal, so do some research. My T20 is terrible at clerkship placements, particularly outside of the region that we're in (we try, and I think this year was better than a few previous, at least). I don't think we've had anyone get a feeder clerkship in the 3 years I've been there + the 2 years since I've graduated. At least not a major feeder, maybe someone that's placed a couple clerks on SCOTUS throughout their tenure as judges. I also know that we haven't had a SCOTUS clerk from our school since . . . . well, a long time ago.

If you were at my school I'd say transferring will probably be beneficial in every way possible.


In that range, I've heard that Vanderbilt punches above its weight pretty routinely. UT has good Southern placement. USC/UCLA dominate federal district courts in California, get onto the 9th pretty well, and then have a tougher time going back west. Haven't heard anything specific about WUSTL (leading me to believe it doesn't do great) and Minnesota (other than that they had a single Supreme Court clerk a couple years back which means there is likely SOME high profile connection, but it probably isn't reliable enough to count on.)


That's really helpful. Does anyone have any additional insight into UT and Vandy?

nonprofit-prophet
Posts: 844
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:10 am

Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:25 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Citizen Genet wrote:
lolwat wrote:It's early and I have to head off to work soon, so I'm not sure if anyone's said this since the thread got kinda derailed into talking about HYS professors and the like, but:

Not all T20s are created equal, so do some research. My T20 is terrible at clerkship placements, particularly outside of the region that we're in (we try, and I think this year was better than a few previous, at least). I don't think we've had anyone get a feeder clerkship in the 3 years I've been there + the 2 years since I've graduated. At least not a major feeder, maybe someone that's placed a couple clerks on SCOTUS throughout their tenure as judges. I also know that we haven't had a SCOTUS clerk from our school since . . . . well, a long time ago.

If you were at my school I'd say transferring will probably be beneficial in every way possible.


In that range, I've heard that Vanderbilt punches above its weight pretty routinely. UT has good Southern placement. USC/UCLA dominate federal district courts in California, get onto the 9th pretty well, and then have a tougher time going back west. Haven't heard anything specific about WUSTL (leading me to believe it doesn't do great) and Minnesota (other than that they had a single Supreme Court clerk a couple years back which means there is likely SOME high profile connection, but it probably isn't reliable enough to count on.)


That's really helpful. Does anyone have any additional insight into UT and Vandy?


PM me if you're at UT.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273578
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:56 pm

N/A.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273578
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:33 pm

Citizen Genet wrote: Haven't heard anything specific about WUSTL (leading me to believe it doesn't do great)


Correct. We had one SCOTUS clerk back in the 60s, and I'm fairly certain that no one in recent history has even clerked for a feeder. Or a semi-feeder. We just haven't been a good school long enough to have the institutional gravitas. It's hard to develop pipelines when you don't already have them.

I'd almost go so far as to say don't come here if clerking is really important to you. We place about 4 kids in COA clerkships per year, and maybe 4 more in D.Ct. It's ugly.

/rant from applicant currently in the throes of the process

Anonymous User
Posts: 273578
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Feeder Clerkship as a Transfer--Any success stories?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:33 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Citizen Genet wrote: Haven't heard anything specific about WUSTL (leading me to believe it doesn't do great)


Correct. We had one SCOTUS clerk back in the 60s, and I'm fairly certain that no one in recent history has even clerked for a feeder. Or a semi-feeder. We just haven't been a good school long enough to have the institutional gravitas. It's hard to develop pipelines when you don't already have them.

I'd almost go so far as to say don't come here if clerking is really important to you. We place about 4 kids in COA clerkships per year, and maybe 4 more in D.Ct. It's ugly.

/rant from applicant currently in the throes of the process


if you're in top 10% or so and want to talk about it, post non-anon and i can pm you. it's REALLY hard to get anything outside of that though, iirc




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