Tutor after law school

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Wumbo

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Tutor after law school

Postby Wumbo » Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:17 am

I'm currently a 3L at YHS, and despite having an offer from a firm, I'm considering just tutoring after law school instead if I can get a job at one of the higher paying companies (or perhaps just go solo).

I got 99+ percentile on LSAT, so that would qualify me for the better companies, and I also happened to score above 99th on GRE, so that would me to get more hours if I did get a job at a place that teaches both.

As for the reasons why, the main reasons are flexibility, job satisfaction, and good pay, with the latter two obviously being orders of magnitude superior to big law, and the latter being still pretty high in absolute terms, especially if I got a gig paying 100 an hour.

For example, at that rate, even if I only worked an average of 10hrs a week, 50 weeks a year, I would be living as well as a public defender (50k) who basically got 4 free sick days a week. At 20hrs a week, I would be making more than a successful small law attorney (100k), and at 30hrs a week (150k) I'd be approaching biglaw numbers. The only thing I'd be lacking is the "prestige" of being a practicing attorney, but then again (a) I don't really give a shit, and (b) I already have plenty of fucking prestige from going to YHS.

Also, I don't have any debt, and never wanted to practice (I'm pursuing other "JD advantage" opportunities in case anyone cares, though tbh even compared to those tutoring seems pretty desirable).

Is there something I'm missing? Is there a reason more of those who don't want to practice don't go this route for reasons other than the sunk cost fallacy (which undoubtedly some of you will likewise commit when asking me why I want to do this)?

Thoughts would be appreciated.

AJordan

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Re: Tutor after law school

Postby AJordan » Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:47 pm

Being qualified != able to get paid. The market isn't exactly free from flooding. Sure, it's possible, but it's not like everybody working for these companies gets ten hours a week. I work for one, have a niche, and while I have months where I can get 40+ hours fairly easily I also have months where I have a big fat donut. If anybody has an hours guarantee I would love to hear about it.

Maybe solo would be better? That's probably location dependent more than anything else. Getting that initial set of business is easier said than done on your own I imagine. Companies make you sign a non compete so it's not like you can supplement the former with the latter.

Wumbo

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Re: Tutor after law school

Postby Wumbo » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:55 am

AJordan wrote:Being qualified != able to get paid. The market isn't exactly free from flooding. Sure, it's possible, but it's not like everybody working for these companies gets ten hours a week. I work for one, have a niche, and while I have months where I can get 40+ hours fairly easily I also have months where I have a big fat donut. If anybody has an hours guarantee I would love to hear about it.

Maybe solo would be better? That's probably location dependent more than anything else. Getting that initial set of business is easier said than done on your own I imagine. Companies make you sign a non compete so it's not like you can supplement the former with the latter.


Thanks. I thought about testing the waters through solo (as in advertising as a tutor and seeing how easy it is to land business) before trying to work for a company, but tbh I don't think I'd make a good tutor right now anyway, so I thought it may be more optimal to work for company, get good training, then quit and breach the non-compete if I can't get enough work, since they're not enforceable in most states anyway as long as you don't work for the company anymore.

Weird that it's so unstable though. Are all these guys part-timers? Seems difficult to believe that companies could reel in so many 1% test takers without providing them a semi-steady income. Anecdotally, I do know of a guy here that works 20 hours a week for a better paying company, and supposedly would work more if it weren't for the school policy to work less than 20 as a student (though perhaps that 20 hours a week isn't every week but rather only when he gets that much work).

AJordan

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Re: Tutor after law school

Postby AJordan » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:53 am

Part of me just thinks that if it was that easy and that lucrative the jobs would never come open. I agree that going company first is a good way to learn how to teach the test. I want to say it took me a year before I was completely comfortable adjusting on the fly during 1-on-1s and that was the point I felt genuine confidence in my ability. But there are also times where I compare my payout to the price the students are paying and definitely contemplate how to go solo. If you know a guy and have a way in to 20 hours a week I say go for it. Not all gigs pay 100/hour btw.

Also, they're not all hiring just 1%ers. One large company, for instance, has a reputation for hiring instructors who scored in the low-mid 160s which, to me, is part of the reason why they have such a poor reputation. But the name carries weight so they don't need to hire 170+. *shrug* economics.



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