Supplements as primary source of studying

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Kya6

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Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:56 pm

Hey everyone!
New 1L here. Quick question. I was wondering if this would be a solid study structure.

To use quimbee and other canned briefs to get familiar with the assigned cases, as well as learn the rule / black letter law. Then go through the cases ( without briefing) so I can be ready for class and cold calls. Then use supplements, E&Es for example as my main source of studying( go through them cover to cover) Sorry if this was simple but would love your honest advice! I am not trying to take short cuts or anything, just want to make sure I am studying efficiently and effectively for the exams!

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Pneumonia

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Pneumonia » Fri Aug 24, 2018 6:44 pm

Your study structure should depend on your professor. Get a month or so of class under your belt, then revist this question. Legal learning is fairly idiosyncratic. Also, I've never heard of a professor teaching ALL of the material in a casebook. 1L Civ Pro might come the closest, but even for that you're almost certainly going to be reading less than 50% of the book. So reading an E&E front to back will rarely be an efficient use of time.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 7:25 pm

Thanks for the response! So would you recommend reading the relevant sections of the E&Es that correspond to the overarching themes discussed in class? I just want to make sure that I am spending my time and energy in a manner that will pay off on the exam, rather then in class. Any advise is highly appreciated!

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Lolstudent » Fri Aug 24, 2018 8:35 pm

Kya6 wrote:Thanks for the response! So would you recommend reading the relevant sections of the E&Es that correspond to the overarching themes discussed in class? I just want to make sure that I am spending my time and energy in a manner that will pay off on the exam, rather then in class. Any advise is highly appreciated!


That's a good strategy. I would read the relevant E&E section after class and do the sample problems. I never did long form briefs but did book brief (highlight and notes in margins). This was good enough to survive cold calls. Do not overthink supplements though. I had peers who did very well that never cracked a supplement.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby nixy » Fri Aug 24, 2018 8:37 pm

Yeah, you should be able to excel on an exam just fine by using the assigned materials. Supplements really should be supplements - sources to clarify stuff that's confusing, not actual additional textbooks (I guess doing problems in the E&E can be useful practice, but again, only what's relevant to what your prof teaches.)

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:07 pm

Thanks for the responses, I really appreciate it. Will def just try my best to put in the work with the cases, and use the supplements to help distill the black letter law. Any other recommendations for general 1L success? I’ve read all the guides and what not, but more advice never hurts!

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby dogger » Sat Aug 25, 2018 10:00 am

Kya6 wrote:Thanks for the responses, I really appreciate it. Will def just try my best to put in the work with the cases, and use the supplements to help distill the black letter law. Any other recommendations for general 1L success? I’ve read all the guides and what not, but more advice never hurts!


- I've found no appreciable difference in my exam performance when I used supplements - no correlation to my exam performance. I don't bother anymore. I just ask in office hours or similar.

- Make everything into flow charts (decision trees) as much as possible. For example, a personal jurisdiction flowchart. A criminal law flowchart for murder/manslaughter. A torts flowchart for battery/negligence, etc. Literally draw them.

- Write exam answers just like the decision trees. If a certain path is wrong, dismiss it and move on. You get points for that.

- Remember that claims are not mutually exclusive. If on an exam, there could be both battery and negligence, then say so, and assess strength of claims. Don't vomit everything you know necessarily, but definitely include anything relevant.

- Take a stance on exams. Pick a side and back it up. Don't just say there "may be an issue" with something and stop. Be persuasive and confident.

- When you read cases all on a similar topic, think of them as a bundle and how they relate. Maybe four or five cases all cover different approaches to the same problem (or majority and minority rules). Try to think of a bigger picture - no isolated cases unless a case you read is a unique approach or historical lesson.

- Knowing facts of cases might help a little on exams if you want to make comparisons to them, but generally, knowing the facts is just for class (in my opinion).

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 11:49 am

Thanks for the detailed response. As of now, like I mentioned above, my POA will be to read the cases, attempt to extract the relevant rule(s), and take meticulous class notes. Following that, I will look at the relevant E&E primarily to supplement my understanding, and combine all three on my outline, hopefully arming myself enough with an adequate understanding of the BLL to attack exams. I’ve read a lot on this thread that a detailed knowledge of actual cases isn’t really necessary, and that a basic understanding ( for analogy purposes) is adequate, so I will tailor my studies to really distilling the BLL that can actually be applied on hypos and mc questions. Sound good?

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Lolstudent » Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:46 pm

Kya6 wrote:Thanks for the detailed response. As of now, like I mentioned above, my POA will be to read the cases, attempt to extract the relevant rule(s), and take meticulous class notes. Following that, I will look at the relevant E&E primarily to supplement my understanding, and combine all three on my outline, hopefully arming myself enough with an adequate understanding of the BLL to attack exams. I’ve read a lot on this thread that a detailed knowledge of actual cases isn’t really necessary, and that a basic understanding ( for analogy purposes) is adequate, so I will tailor my studies to really distilling the BLL that can actually be applied on hypos and mc questions. Sound good?


This is a solid plan and you really can't do much more strategic planning before classes start. Just enjoy what's left of summer and get ready for a challenging year. Other advice: work as hard as you can while maintaining a positive attitude, good mental and physical health, and your relationships. Try to keep your hobbies. Be flexible. Take a few days off if you feel like the break would do more good than harm. And perhaps most importantly, never ever underestimate your peers and assume that you will land at the top.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 12:17 am

I appreciate the feedback! This forum really aids in mitigating the inevitable 1L nervousness. I started classes Friday and just want to ensure I am doing everything in my control to best position myself for success. Plan on working from 9-6 each day( other then Saturday’s), and using Sunday’s to outline, giving me enough time to workout, get dinner with the gf and family etc. thanks again for all the advice and support !

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby basketofbread » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:02 pm

Follow Arrow's advice. The people who can use only the assigned material and do well are special. Don't assume you're special. The supplements don't only present the material in a more no-bullshit / straightforward way, they give you doctrine specific exam style questions to practice your analysis, with actual detailed answers.

My advice would be to read the EE chapters before the class on the subject, and before the reading on the subject. That way, you already know what's important, and can pick out the interesting / illuminating aspects of the reading and class to supplement your understanding of the BLL, rather than search the morass for the BLL. As well, read supplement chapters ahead of the assigned readings. I think this is probably more useful than reading the assigned readings ahead.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby nixy » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:46 pm

Except that if your prof teaches completely differently from the E&E, reading it beforehand doesn't actually tell you what's important, because what's important is what your prof teaches and tests on.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:31 pm

Definitely agree with both of you. After reading through a couple of contract/ tort cases today, ( very simple and illuminating general subtopics such as intent, and damage interests), I believe that using the E&Es would be highly beneficial subsequent to reading and class discussion, as I can get a feel for what the professor deems important, while also supplementing my understanding of the relevant BLL found within the assigned readings. I also like that the E&Es give practical examples of the law in practice, making it easier to distill and utilize on exams. All the advice is greatly appreciated, and extremely helpful!

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby 4LTsPointingNorth » Sun Aug 26, 2018 11:12 pm

Kya6 wrote:Definitely agree with both of you. After reading through a couple of contract/ tort cases today, ( very simple and illuminating general subtopics such as intent, and damage interests), I believe that using the E&Es would be highly beneficial subsequent to reading and class discussion, as I can get a feel for what the professor deems important, while also supplementing my understanding of the relevant BLL found within the assigned readings. I also like that the E&Es give practical examples of the law in practice, making it easier to distill and utilize on exams. All the advice is greatly appreciated, and extremely helpful!


Always remember that you aren't being tested on the comprehensiveness or accuracy of your knowledge of the relevant law. You're being tested on your ability to spot and analyze the issues your professor chooses to insert into the exam.

So use supplements to improve your comfort level with the material and your ability to take higher quality class notes, but when it comes to exam prep rely on class notes and office hours to really hone in on what to outline for what will actually be tested on your exams.

It's an unfortunate truth that the only thing that matters from 1L is your exam grades. So you should always be focused on the test that matters, not the moments that don't (e.g., cold calls or ungraded courses).

Also, make sure to go to office hours at least once for each course. Don't try to seem smart or pretend like you really understand the material, just come with a question or two about the material and be interested in whatever your professor has to say. This can sometimes bump you up half a letter grade with some professors (and is totally worth trying for as a result).

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby bretby » Sun Aug 26, 2018 11:32 pm

This study plan sounds counter-productive and crazy-making. Start just reading the assigned reading and get a sense of what (if anything) you're not picking up for class that the professor finds important. Especially for 1L topics the E&Es and supplements can actually be detrimental as every professor teaches different material and no one teaches "all" the subject. Relying on (or even using) supplements puts you at a serious risk of not understanding what material YOUR professor wants you to know in the way they want you to know it (which is all that matters) and/or knowing extraneous material that will in no way help you but might actually hurt you as it will prove confusing and a distraction on an exam. Run very quickly and very far away from this study plan.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Pneumonia » Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:21 am

bretby wrote:This study plan sounds counter-productive and crazy-making. Start just reading the assigned reading and get a sense of what (if anything) you're not picking up for class that the professor finds important. Especially for 1L topics the E&Es and supplements can actually be detrimental as every professor teaches different material and no one teaches "all" the subject. Relying on (or even using) supplements puts you at a serious risk of not understanding what material YOUR professor wants you to know in the way they want you to know it (which is all that matters) and/or knowing extraneous material that will in no way help you but might actually hurt you as it will prove confusing and a distraction on an exam. Run very quickly and very far away from this study plan.

And a lot of professors will teach the same material differently. Take, for example, the statement that "a federal court has personal jurisdiction over a non-resident defendant if the defendant has minimum contacts with the forum state and jurisdiction would neither offend traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice nor violate reasonable litigation standards."

This rule is the "black-letter" law as taught by my Civ Pro professor. He built it up from a lot of cases, any one of which, if subtracted, would have affected the rule. And he left cases out too. Those cases, if added, also would have affected the rule. Anyone who remembers their Civ Pro class could likely argue that the rule given above is either redundant or incomplete. But even assuming the rule is 100% accurate and that all law professors agree on it (they don't) and the E&E reflects that agreement (it doesn't)--what is the actual rule?

Your exam asks you do determine if a federal court has jurisdiction. What do you do?

(1) Discuss minimum contacts (your prof thinks "traditional notions" are just part of the contacts analysis)

or

(1) Discuss minimum contacts
(2) Discuss traditional notions (your prof thinks "fair play" and "substantial justice" are the same thing)

or

(1) Minimum contacts
(2) Traditional notions of fair play
(3) Traditional notions of substantial justice (your prof thinks "traditional notions" and "reasonable litigation standards" are the same thing)

or

(1) Minimum contacts
(2) Traditional notions of (a) fair play and (b) substantial justice
(3) Reasonable litigation standards

etc.

This is just one black letter "rule," and it completely ignores the complex issue of what "minimum contacts" even are.

So the E&E will give you a rule, yes. The rule will use a lot of the same words that you hear in class--but it will VERY LIKELY NOT be the exact same rule as the one your prof wants you to use on the exam. And it certainly won't be the same rule in every instance. Don't let the similarity fool you. If you organize your exam answer to discuss "fair play" and "substantial justice" separately when your prof has emphasized that they're the same thing, then you'll be well on your way to median. Similarly, if you discuss them together when your prof's spent half a day of class emphasizing that they're separate inquiries, same result.

Note also that this hypo illustrates another aspect of exams that the E&E won't help you with. Your job is not to learn the law. Your job is to learn (and eventually apply) your professor's version of the law. Those two things are rarely the same.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:04 pm

So would you guys forgo using the supplements at all? I completely understand the need to gauge the professor, and prioritize their version of the law, but also believe that reading the E&E after case readings and class discussion could be of use as the examples demonstrate the actual application of the BLL, which would be extremely useful on the exam. Getting completely contradictory advice now :( From all my reading on TLS, I assumed the majority opinion was to firstly and most importantly
Learn your professor.
Again I totally u dersyand that and will follow that advice, but I have also again seen in so many 1L success guides that supplements are essential to distilling the BLL for exam purposes. So now I’m just confused and discouraged after spending the last two hours going through the contracts E&E before class lolol.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby nixy » Mon Aug 27, 2018 6:45 pm

I only went to the supplements to clarify anything that was unclear. So my suggestion is read the assignment, go to class, take notes (judicially - lots on what the prof says, less on what your classmates say), and when you’re outlining in the second half of the semester, if stuff is confusing, then try the supplements.

If you have time to read the relevant stuff after going to class that’s an option, too, I just think it’s very secondary.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby basketofbread » Tue Aug 28, 2018 6:54 pm

Kya6 wrote:So would you guys forgo using the supplements at all? I completely understand the need to gauge the professor, and prioritize their version of the law, but also believe that reading the E&E after case readings and class discussion could be of use as the examples demonstrate the actual application of the BLL, which would be extremely useful on the exam. Getting completely contradictory advice now :( From all my reading on TLS, I assumed the majority opinion was to firstly and most importantly
Learn your professor.
Again I totally u dersyand that and will follow that advice, but I have also again seen in so many 1L success guides that supplements are essential to distilling the BLL for exam purposes. So now I’m just confused and discouraged after spending the last two hours going through the contracts E&E before class lolol.


The real answer is that whatever works for you is what works for you. Some people on law review didn't use supplements at all - some used some when they were confused - I used them heavily. This explains the contradictory information.

I suppose there might be a Professor out there who will teach the elements of battery in such a different way than the mainstream sources that the supplemental materials won't help you learn to apply the doctrine. I can't possibly see how this would be the case but okay. In that case, use his definition.

The cure for the problem of the supplement covering stuff you don't cover in class is to not read those chapters - easy.

Also, you must realize that lots of professors don't think it's their job, or particularly interesting, to teach you the doctrine in class. They think it's your job to learn it on your own, and class is the realm for playing with the history, policies, moralities, rationales, etc... behind the doctrine. Only my shittiest Professor spent his class time reading elements of a cause of action off the board. Yet ALL of their exams were fact patterns where you were graded on how well you understood how to apply the doctrine. Watch how many of your classmates do poorly because they think the professor wants to see their policy opinions on an exam.

Tldr exams test doctrine. Learn the doctrine and how to apply it. Supplements teach you this better than casebooks (generally) because they have questions and answers.

Yes, your professor's particular style is important. It can help you understand what they like to test, what their exam format is like, etc... But your professor probably won't have such a unique take on basic common law doctrines that supplements won't help you... it would be weird if your school hired someone to teach you law whose idea abou the doctrines were wildly out of the mainstream. It is trade school after all.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby bretby » Fri Aug 31, 2018 1:28 pm

basketofbread wrote:
Kya6 wrote:So would you guys forgo using the supplements at all? I completely understand the need to gauge the professor, and prioritize their version of the law, but also believe that reading the E&E after case readings and class discussion could be of use as the examples demonstrate the actual application of the BLL, which would be extremely useful on the exam. Getting completely contradictory advice now :( From all my reading on TLS, I assumed the majority opinion was to firstly and most importantly
Learn your professor.
Again I totally u dersyand that and will follow that advice, but I have also again seen in so many 1L success guides that supplements are essential to distilling the BLL for exam purposes. So now I’m just confused and discouraged after spending the last two hours going through the contracts E&E before class lolol.


The real answer is that whatever works for you is what works for you. Some people on law review didn't use supplements at all - some used some when they were confused - I used them heavily. This explains the contradictory information.

I suppose there might be a Professor out there who will teach the elements of battery in such a different way than the mainstream sources that the supplemental materials won't help you learn to apply the doctrine. I can't possibly see how this would be the case but okay. In that case, use his definition.

The cure for the problem of the supplement covering stuff you don't cover in class is to not read those chapters - easy.

Also, you must realize that lots of professors don't think it's their job, or particularly interesting, to teach you the doctrine in class. They think it's your job to learn it on your own, and class is the realm for playing with the history, policies, moralities, rationales, etc... behind the doctrine. Only my shittiest Professor spent his class time reading elements of a cause of action off the board. Yet ALL of their exams were fact patterns where you were graded on how well you understood how to apply the doctrine. Watch how many of your classmates do poorly because they think the professor wants to see their policy opinions on an exam.

Tldr exams test doctrine. Learn the doctrine and how to apply it. Supplements teach you this better than casebooks (generally) because they have questions and answers.

Yes, your professor's particular style is important. It can help you understand what they like to test, what their exam format is like, etc... But your professor probably won't have such a unique take on basic common law doctrines that supplements won't help you... it would be weird if your school hired someone to teach you law whose idea abou the doctrines were wildly out of the mainstream. It is trade school after all.


I disagree with this and think Pneumonia's post above is more correct. Even with BLL and doctrine there are things your professor will emphasize, approaches they will encourage, etc., that may differ from those presented in the supplements. The Civ Pro example is a great one, and even in more straightforward courses like Torts how you use the doctrine is often more important in terms of your grade than simply knowing the doctrine. The supplement author may adopt a different approach to, for example, analyzing causation (which you might think would be universal, but you would be wrong) than does your prof such that it proves a handicap rather than a help on the exam which, again, is all that matters.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby basketofbread » Fri Aug 31, 2018 6:36 pm

bretby wrote:
basketofbread wrote:
Kya6 wrote:So would you guys forgo using the supplements at all? I completely understand the need to gauge the professor, and prioritize their version of the law, but also believe that reading the E&E after case readings and class discussion could be of use as the examples demonstrate the actual application of the BLL, which would be extremely useful on the exam. Getting completely contradictory advice now :( From all my reading on TLS, I assumed the majority opinion was to firstly and most importantly
Learn your professor.
Again I totally u dersyand that and will follow that advice, but I have also again seen in so many 1L success guides that supplements are essential to distilling the BLL for exam purposes. So now I’m just confused and discouraged after spending the last two hours going through the contracts E&E before class lolol.


The real answer is that whatever works for you is what works for you. Some people on law review didn't use supplements at all - some used some when they were confused - I used them heavily. This explains the contradictory information.

I suppose there might be a Professor out there who will teach the elements of battery in such a different way than the mainstream sources that the supplemental materials won't help you learn to apply the doctrine. I can't possibly see how this would be the case but okay. In that case, use his definition.

The cure for the problem of the supplement covering stuff you don't cover in class is to not read those chapters - easy.

Also, you must realize that lots of professors don't think it's their job, or particularly interesting, to teach you the doctrine in class. They think it's your job to learn it on your own, and class is the realm for playing with the history, policies, moralities, rationales, etc... behind the doctrine. Only my shittiest Professor spent his class time reading elements of a cause of action off the board. Yet ALL of their exams were fact patterns where you were graded on how well you understood how to apply the doctrine. Watch how many of your classmates do poorly because they think the professor wants to see their policy opinions on an exam.

Tldr exams test doctrine. Learn the doctrine and how to apply it. Supplements teach you this better than casebooks (generally) because they have questions and answers.

Yes, your professor's particular style is important. It can help you understand what they like to test, what their exam format is like, etc... But your professor probably won't have such a unique take on basic common law doctrines that supplements won't help you... it would be weird if your school hired someone to teach you law whose idea abou the doctrines were wildly out of the mainstream. It is trade school after all.


I disagree with this and think Pneumonia's post above is more correct. Even with BLL and doctrine there are things your professor will emphasize, approaches they will encourage, etc., that may differ from those presented in the supplements. The Civ Pro example is a great one, and even in more straightforward courses like Torts how you use the doctrine is often more important in terms of your grade than simply knowing the doctrine. The supplement author may adopt a different approach to, for example, analyzing causation (which you might think would be universal, but you would be wrong) than does your prof such that it proves a handicap rather than a help on the exam which, again, is all that matters.


But here the question is whether the supplements can help in preparing for your professor's test, not whether you can ignore your professor and their casebook and rely on the supplement- that sounds like a bad idea. Of course how your professor teaches trumps what the supplement, and even what the casebook says. My anecdotal experience of the supplements / professors being virtually in sync is just that, anecdotal. You may well have professors that teach the doctrine quite differently.

I think OP's question is whether the supplements can aid in learning the doctrine according to your professor. It's funny that the example is a Civ Pro concept, because Glannon's Civ Pro E&E is always brought up as a fantastic supplement. Of course there are differences in how the concepts are taught, but the book provides a range of scenarios for applying the concepts, which you otherwise would not get through the casebook or through class.

If I read a concept in a supplement that I don't remember being reflected in the casebook or in class, I would make it a point to check that it was taught in class / in the casebook, and so is fair game. Many small concepts which were overlooked in endless case-notes were featured in an E&E problem and brought to my attention. Subtleties in applying the doctrine my professors taught revealed themselves in trying to apply it to supplement examples.

I just don't see a harm in at least TRYING to use them. OP - if you read a concept that is not taught in class, or through the casebook, then consider it off-limits for the exam. If your professor formulates something differently than the supplement / casebook, then use that formulation. You're not an idiot, you can execute judgment. They're called supplements, not substitutes.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Pneumonia » Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:52 pm

I agree that Glannon's is a fantastic resource.

My post was responding, in particular, to this--

Kya6 wrote:I was wondering if this would be a solid study structure.

. . . . Then use supplements, E&Es for example as my main source of studying( go through them cover to cover)!


It appears the conversation has transitioned from "should supplements be the 'main source of studying'" to "whether one should 'forgo using the supplements at all'" to "whether supplements can help." No, they should not be your main source of studying. Yes, they can be helpful.

I intended my long post to illustrate why supplements shouldn't be anyone's primary source. And I don't think any exam will ever all fore reading one cover-to-cover. But I didn't mean to suggest that supplements aren't worth consulting. They are. Especially, as basket mentioned, Glannon's for civ pro.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Kya6 » Fri Aug 31, 2018 9:13 pm

Hey everyone,
Thanks for all the feedback. Yes- I wasn’t insinuating that I would completely ignore the case book, nor what the professor says in class. What I’ve been doing the last week is using quimbee prior to reading the case to get the Rule. Then reading the cases, but actively reading and extracting information I deem important. Then using the E&E on the relevant topic to supplement my understanding. Sunday I will take all of these sources and create the start of my outline for the course. Again, I have found that the E&Es really provide a clear view of these complex topics ( just getting into personal jurisdiction lol), but I am also sure to prioritize first and foremost what my professors say in class.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby notsonotorious » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:04 pm

My tips:

1. Listen to and take extremely detailed notes on what the professor says and focuses on (note little things like when they spend a lot of time on a dissent, when they emphasize a policy question (rather than just the majority rule)).

2. Go to office hours as often as possible even when you don't have super smart questions. Likely there will be other students in there asking questions. Lot of useful stuff come up in these.

3. Go to TA review sessions if you have them. Ask the TAs about what they think the professor cares about beyond cases (for example: restatements? policy?). The point is to get exposed to this material as often as possible (similar reason for 2.)

4. Try to get access to and read a full exam and sample answer about half way through the semester. This will help put in context what it is that you're actually getting ready for and demystify the whole thing.

5. Go back and re-read cases. It's amazing how you start seeing different things after a while.

6. Review and outline on an on-going basis. Don't wait until then end or even 1/2 of them semester to go by.

7. Get a study group. It may feel awkward at first. Meet to discuss questions and cases. You may think you know stuff but you probably don't. You will learn by best by explaining stuff to other people. By the end of the semester this will be most helpful to go over past exams. For many profs, there is no other way to get answers.

8. Be kind to everyone. It's a small profession.

9. Try to do one (but no more than one) out-of-class activity (ACS, FedSoc, affinity group, etc). It's nice to meet people outside of your section and just enjoy law school a tiny bit.

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Re: Supplements as primary source of studying

Postby Keilz » Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:32 pm

I would not worry so much about getting the black letter rule immediately from one lesson. It takes a couple of classes to understand the entire unit within the course. Supplements work the best for civ pro, and maybe criminal law, since those are more amenable to rules or flow-chart approaches. Maybe contracts, but I didn't use a supplement. After a couple of classes, re-read your supplements and relevant part of the cases to confirm how the case fits into the overall class. I would suggest highlighting relevant parts of the cases (like the holding), so that you can re-visit them as you review.



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