Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

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Dawg57

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby Dawg57 » Tue Apr 10, 2018 11:05 am

Elle in Combat Boots wrote:
Dawg57 wrote: Hmmm, noted. Remembering that you said you aren’t directly involved in the selection process, how would you suggest we gather any information or feedback on how to improve to insure an improved chance of selection in the next board? Or is this move intentional to make it harder to improve? I get logistically why the policy of no individual feedback makes sense. But being that we are already in a position of limited ability to improve our app, it makes me wonder about what direction to take to brainstorm improvement.


From what I can gather, it's merely a time-constraint. I reviewed an intern's application last summer, and it was a good 45-60 minutes reviewing what he submitted and conducting a follow up discussion on what he could improve. If dozens (or more?) are calling to ask for that kind of individual attention, I imagine it would be debilitating.

There have been plenty of discussions in this thread and the Military Law thread on what makes for a competitive application--nothing else I can really add. If you were (are?) an intern/extern, you could reach back to your supervisor to ask for an application review. If an officer visits your school, bring your resume & motivational statement and ask for their feedback.

Keep applying. I know an officer who was selected on his 5th try, and a few prior interns that weren't selected until their 3rd or 4th applications.


I can totally understand how its pure resource management to no longer allow individual review. Makes sense really given the efforts to speed up and clean up this whole process, which I think we are already seeing the fruits of. This is appreciated advice, I have professional connections with JAG Officers through the channels you suggest as well as others, so I suppose taking the time to talk with them about my application when afforded the chance is the next step in my process. I intend to apply, in perpetuity, until I get in and I am willing and able to accept the "hurry up and wait" lifestyle of work in the military. But I can honestly say it'll be easier to embrace that concept if/once I am actually on the path to a commission.

As always, thank you for the feedback and words of guidance. Its incredible how over years this thread and the Military Law thread there are always folks working within branches willing to take tons of their own time to help those of us trying to get in.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby Fed_Atty » Tue Apr 10, 2018 5:40 pm

With respect to providing feedback, it is hard to know why you were not chosen. I sat on a few different boards. The process is intended to mirror a promotion board to the maximum extent possible. Each member of the board is assigned a certain number of records, that person is your briefer. The order of briefing is randomized.

Each record will be briefed and voted on. At least for the boards I participated in, voters could assign a score of 100, 75, 50, 25 or 0. After each record has been voted on, the board will receive a report that indicates the various scores and number of people that received that score. So let’s say there were 6 members of the board, the scores could range from 600 (all members voted 100) to 0 (all voters rated 0). Also, for sake of argument, let’s say that there were 100 applicants and the board is authorized to select 50. One voting member may make a motion to tentatively select the 10 members that received scores of 500 or better and deselect the 10 records that received 100 or lower. This results in 80 applicants for 40 slots now. Another member will second the motion and then the 4 remaining will either vote yes or no. Provided that a majority agrees, the applicants that are either selected or rejected will be removed. The members will then review the remaining records and brief all over again. At the end of the 2nd briefing more applicants will be selected and more will be removed. The process will continue until 50 applicants have been selected.

The tricky part is, only the board members know what exactly happened and they cannot discuss the board. So if you ask me to look at your application, I don’t know whether you were immediately removed from consideration or made it to the very end and only narrowly missed the cut. I also won’t know what those selected had that you didn’t.

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fltanglab

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby fltanglab » Tue Apr 10, 2018 10:53 pm

To answer the above question about improving an application, I would recommend having someone in the JAG Corps walk you through the entire process. That really helped me with putting together my application and also with the interview. I didn't end up having anyone read my entire application (I am of the opinion that my applications are typically too personal to be shared), but even brainstorming with a current JAG about the types of things to include/leave off, what to emphasize, etc. really helped me tailor and refine my application. I of course don't know how strong my application was, but I was just pro rec'd on the first try as a DA applicant, so I assume all the preparation made the difference. I'm not like some super experienced litigator with top top grades from HYS either.

Also I hate how much law students worry about grades. I wasted so many tears on grades. If you have terrible grades, pick yourself up and make up for it by being excellent in everything else you do. Otherwise your opinion that your grades aren't a reflection of your lawyering ability is just that- an opinion. You need proof to make that claim. I am also under the impression that your motivational statement is pretty critical, so it should be a top notch piece of writing. That goes for cover letters too, but it's even more important than a cover letter.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby fuzz » Wed Apr 11, 2018 7:49 am

Fed_Atty wrote:With respect to providing feedback, it is hard to know why you were not chosen. I sat on a few different boards. The process is intended to mirror a promotion board to the maximum extent possible. Each member of the board is assigned a certain number of records, that person is your briefer. The order of briefing is randomized.

Each record will be briefed and voted on. At least for the boards I participated in, voters could assign a score of 100, 75, 50, 25 or 0. After each record has been voted on, the board will receive a report that indicates the various scores and number of people that received that score. So let’s say there were 6 members of the board, the scores could range from 600 (all members voted 100) to 0 (all voters rated 0). Also, for sake of argument, let’s say that there were 100 applicants and the board is authorized to select 50. One voting member may make a motion to tentatively select the 10 members that received scores of 500 or better and deselect the 10 records that received 100 or lower. This results in 80 applicants for 40 slots now. Another member will second the motion and then the 4 remaining will either vote yes or no. Provided that a majority agrees, the applicants that are either selected or rejected will be removed. The members will then review the remaining records and brief all over again. At the end of the 2nd briefing more applicants will be selected and more will be removed. The process will continue until 50 applicants have been selected.

The tricky part is, only the board members know what exactly happened and they cannot discuss the board. So if you ask me to look at your application, I don’t know whether you were immediately removed from consideration or made it to the very end and only narrowly missed the cut. I also won’t know what those selected had that you didn’t.


Thank you for this info! A couple quick questions -

How does the fact of prior applications factor into the scoring? Similarly, how does the substance of prior applications factor into scoring? I've heard that the board likes to see that your application has been updated/improved since the last time, but is your current app actually compared in some way to your prior apps? Is it the briefer's job to just let the board know, "oh, and also, it looks like they really tried to revamp their app this time, so keep that in mind" ...?

Elle in Combat Boots

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby Elle in Combat Boots » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:12 am

fuzz wrote: Thank you for this info! A couple quick questions -

How does the fact of prior applications factor into the scoring? Similarly, how does the substance of prior applications factor into scoring? I've heard that the board likes to see that your application has been updated/improved since the last time, but is your current app actually compared in some way to your prior apps? Is it the briefer's job to just let the board know, "oh, and also, it looks like they really tried to revamp their app this time, so keep that in mind" ...?


Applying multiple times is ONE factor out of many that the board considers. Does it help to keep applying? Sure. Should you just hit "submit" and not update your resume, transcripts, 2-year-old recommendation letters, etc.? Probably not. Board members rotate, but some are repeat participants. There is no comparison between old and new applications, but they see how many times you have applied and if your application is out of date, they might consider how dedicated/serious you are about the JAGC.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby lexineffx » Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:51 am

I was Pro Rec'd this time around (Yay!) as a DA applicant. I was hoping to find more information on logistics. Will the recruiter contact me with a boatload of paperwork? I was going to reach out and ask for the materials now so I can hit the ground running. Also, typically how long is the time between selection and the beginning of ODS? Just trying to plan life logistics and all of that good stuff...

Elle in Combat Boots

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby Elle in Combat Boots » Wed Apr 11, 2018 12:20 pm

lexineffx wrote:I was Pro Rec'd this time around (Yay!) as a DA applicant. I was hoping to find more information on logistics. Will the recruiter contact me with a boatload of paperwork? I was going to reach out and ask for the materials now so I can hit the ground running. Also, typically how long is the time between selection and the beginning of ODS? Just trying to plan life logistics and all of that good stuff...


Suggest you read through the new FAQ here: http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/contact.html. That page answers most of your questions. You will be assigned a local officer recruiter in the next few weeks. Yes, it will be a ton of paperwork.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby ak7ja » Wed Apr 11, 2018 12:25 pm

lexineffx wrote:I was Pro Rec'd this time around (Yay!) as a DA applicant. I was hoping to find more information on logistics. Will the recruiter contact me with a boatload of paperwork? I was going to reach out and ask for the materials now so I can hit the ground running. Also, typically how long is the time between selection and the beginning of ODS? Just trying to plan life logistics and all of that good stuff...


Yes, your recruiter will contact you. Being proactive might just annoy the recruiters because not all officer recruiters handle JAG accessions. If you really want to get started...take a look at DD 2807-1 and gather any required medical documentation that you might need. Medical clearance is the area that can slow some applicants down.

Selection and ODS as a DA really depends on how long it takes you to commission. If all of the stars align and you don't have any medical issues that require waivers/disqualify you, and you don't have any red flags in your background investigation, it could take a few of months at a minimum. The best way to speed the process up is to promptly return all of your required paperwork to the recruiter and gather all documentation you might need for medical waivers.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby lexineffx » Wed Apr 11, 2018 1:08 pm

ak7ja wrote:
lexineffx wrote:I was Pro Rec'd this time around (Yay!) as a DA applicant. I was hoping to find more information on logistics. Will the recruiter contact me with a boatload of paperwork? I was going to reach out and ask for the materials now so I can hit the ground running. Also, typically how long is the time between selection and the beginning of ODS? Just trying to plan life logistics and all of that good stuff...


Yes, your recruiter will contact you. Being proactive might just annoy the recruiters because not all officer recruiters handle JAG accessions. If you really want to get started...take a look at DD 2807-1 and gather any required medical documentation that you might need. Medical clearance is the area that can slow some applicants down.

Selection and ODS as a DA really depends on how long it takes you to commission. If all of the stars align and you don't have any medical issues that require waivers/disqualify you, and you don't have any red flags in your background investigation, it could take a few of months at a minimum. The best way to speed the process up is to promptly return all of your required paperwork to the recruiter and gather all documentation you might need for medical waivers.


Thanks, the link to the medical documentation is exactly what i'm looking for. Certainly not trying to be a pain but direction as to what I need to track down while everything is being worked out keeps me from wasting anyone's time.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby ak7ja » Wed Apr 11, 2018 1:29 pm

lexineffx wrote:
ak7ja wrote:
lexineffx wrote:I was Pro Rec'd this time around (Yay!) as a DA applicant. I was hoping to find more information on logistics. Will the recruiter contact me with a boatload of paperwork? I was going to reach out and ask for the materials now so I can hit the ground running. Also, typically how long is the time between selection and the beginning of ODS? Just trying to plan life logistics and all of that good stuff...


Yes, your recruiter will contact you. Being proactive might just annoy the recruiters because not all officer recruiters handle JAG accessions. If you really want to get started...take a look at DD 2807-1 and gather any required medical documentation that you might need. Medical clearance is the area that can slow some applicants down.

Selection and ODS as a DA really depends on how long it takes you to commission. If all of the stars align and you don't have any medical issues that require waivers/disqualify you, and you don't have any red flags in your background investigation, it could take a few of months at a minimum. The best way to speed the process up is to promptly return all of your required paperwork to the recruiter and gather all documentation you might need for medical waivers.


Thanks, the link to the medical documentation is exactly what i'm looking for. Certainly not trying to be a pain but direction as to what I need to track down while everything is being worked out keeps me from wasting anyone's time.


Focus on documentation for any past surgeries or procedures, prescriptions (especially for controlled substances), any health conditions (like asthma), mental health treatment records, etc. Hope that helps.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby MichaelGScott » Mon Apr 16, 2018 11:49 am

Does anyone know what the selection rates were for the spring board?

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S. Goodman

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby S. Goodman » Mon Apr 16, 2018 1:48 pm

MichaelGScott wrote:Does anyone know what the selection rates were for the spring board?



I always post them, look back through the forum.

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S. Goodman

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby S. Goodman » Mon Apr 16, 2018 1:48 pm

MichaelGScott wrote:Does anyone know what the selection rates were for the spring board?


I always post them, look back through the forum.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby MichaelGScott » Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:53 am

S. Goodman wrote:I always post them, look back through the forum.

I've found the ones from the last few years, I was referring to the selection rates for the one just released, which I do not think have been posted.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby S. Goodman » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:48 am

MichaelGScott wrote:
S. Goodman wrote:I always post them, look back through the forum.

I've found the ones from the last few years, I was referring to the selection rates for the one just released, which I do not think have been posted.


They were just sent out today. See below:

"Recruiting the right team is the foundation of a successful future for our Corps. Building a JAG Corps that is rich in integrity, quality, and diversity is only possible through sustained involvement with law students and leaders in the legal community. Your superb efforts make the Navy JAG Corps an employer of choice as evidenced by the results of the most recent accession selection board.

The Spring 2018 Accession Selection Board was held 20-23 March 2018. The board was composed of . . . [JAG Officers].

The board used the ''whole person" concept to select a diverse team of highly qualified applicants possessing the highest potential! For JAG Corps service. Although strong academic credentials were 'important, board members equally considered an applicant's demonstrated Leadership skills, work experience, quality of character and ability to overcome adversity; motivation, cultural expertise, performance in the structured interview, public service, and\prior military service. The successful completion of a Navy JAG Corps internship or externship was also given favorable consideration.

This board professionally recommended 58 Student program and Direct appointment Program candidates from a pool of 316 impressive applicants for a selection rate of 18%. The class includes 28 women and 30 men from various backgrounds representing 49 different law schools. Our future. colleagues are those who continue the academic and intellectual reputation of. The Navy JAG Corps by having participated in moot court and mock trial competitions, as well as having served as editors for law review and other law school journals. They speak-a host of languages including Jal!8Dese ,Vietnamese, Arabic, Korean, Punjabi and Mandarin and have members of college volleyball, lacrosse, and baseball teams.

Thirteen of our future judge advocates have prior military experience and have completed deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan, and throughout the Pacific. Other individuals have worked for AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps, and as a human rights attorney in Mexico. They have assisted with disaster relief in Puerto Rico, served as a Public Affairs intern in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and as a sergeant in the Orange County Sheriff's office. The diversity of skills and backgrounds these impressive candidates bring to the table will strengthen the ability of the JAG Corps to provide superb legal solutions across the full spectrum of missions and operational environments. · ·

Recruiting in the JAG Corps is an all-hands effort, and judge advocates continue to do an incredible job of reaching the very best talent.”

So it definitely looks like applications are down and selection rates are up. Most likely due to the improving economy and the fact that much better jobs are more readily available. That is what we're seeing on active duty as well. A lot of people are leaving after 4-8 years to get a better job once they get that entry level experience out of the way.

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S. Goodman

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby S. Goodman » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:52 am

Just released:

"Recruiting the right team is the foundation of a successful future for our Corps. Building a JAG Corps that is rich in integrity, quality, and diversity is only possible through sustained involvement with law students and leaders in the legal community. Your superb efforts make the Navy JAG Corps an employer of choice as evidenced by the results of the most recent accession selection board.

The Spring 2018 Accession Selection Board was held 20-23 March 2018. The board was composed of . . . [JAG Officers].

The board used the ''whole person" concept to select a diverse team of highly qualified applicants possessing the highest potential! For JAG Corps service. Although strong academic credentials were 'important, board members equally considered an applicant's demonstrated Leadership skills, work experience, quality of character and ability to overcome adversity; motivation, cultural expertise, performance in the structured interview, public service, and\prior military service. The successful completion of a Navy JAG Corps internship or externship was also given favorable consideration.

This board professionally recommended SS Student program and Direct appointment Program candidates from a pool of 31 impressive applicants for a selection rate of 18%, The class includes 28 women and 30 men from various backgrounds representing 49 different law schools. Our future. colleagues are those who continue the academic and intellectual reputation of. The Navy JAG Corps by having participated in moot court and mock trial competitions, as well as having served as editors for law review and other law school journals. They speak-a host of languages including Jal!8Dese ,Vietnamese, Arabic, Korean, Punjabi and Mandarin and have members of college volleyball, lacrosse, and baseball teams.

Thirteen of our future judge advocates have prior military experience and have completed deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan, and throughout the Pacific. Other individuals have worked for AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps, and as a human rights attorney in Mexico. They have assisted with disaster relief in Puerto Rico, served as a Public Affairs intern in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and as a sergeant in the Orange County Sheriff's office. The diversity of skills and backgrounds these impressive candidates bring to the table will strengthen the ability of the JAG Corps to provide superb legal solutions across the full spectrum of missions and operational environments. · ·

Recruiting in the JAG Corps is an all-hands effort, and judge advocates continue to do an incredible job of reaching the very best talent.”

Looks like selection rates are up and applications are down, likely connected to the improving economy.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby zarzamora » Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:12 pm

I have heard people talk about the litigation "track" within the Navy JAG Corps. Are there other designated career tracks as well, or just litigation?

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby RedPurpleBlue » Wed May 30, 2018 6:58 pm

zarzamora wrote:I have heard people talk about the litigation "track" within the Navy JAG Corps. Are there other designated career tracks as well, or just litigation?

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby Elle in Combat Boots » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:35 am

RedPurpleBlue wrote:
zarzamora wrote:I have heard people talk about the litigation "track" within the Navy JAG Corps. Are there other designated career tracks as well, or just litigation?


OK, ok, I’ll bite.

The Military Justice Litigation Career track is the only one you formally apply for, and once you have the qualification (“MJLQ”), you are primarily placed in litigation/MILJUST billets thereafter. These include trial counsel, defense counsel, and judgeships, but also includes VLC, appellate counsel, and being an instructor at Naval Justice School. More info available here: http://www.jag.navy.mil/library/instruc ... 8_CH-1.pdf.

Can you specialize in other areas of law? Sure, but you won’t necessarily get as many specialized billets like you would with MJLQ. For example, you get your LLM in environmental law, followed by a “payback tour” involving that subject matter. But after that, your next tour could be something totally unrelated to environmental law. You may never have another environmental law-specific billet, or you may have a billet that simply touches on environmental law (i.e. the O-5 billet in Guam involves some environmental law, but that job isn’t specifically advertised as an environmental law-specific billet). Same goes for National Security Law (aka OpLaw/international law). But if you play your cards right and the stars align, you can get numerous billets over your career that involve a specific area of law.

That being said, it will be advantageous to go outside your preferred specialty over the course of your career to get the diversity of legal jobs necessary to promote (i.e. command, department head, different types of SJA jobs, working at OJAG HQ in DC, etc.).

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby lexineffx » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:33 pm

I've been searching back through the threads, now that you have been through ODS/NJS and your first duty station could you reflect on your experience? I'd love to know how you liked your first duty station since i'm about to choose my first; did you think the first tour rotation was interesting? Any tips to a newbie? I'm going to re-post this on other comments but thank you in advance!

S. Goodman wrote:
TheSpanishMain wrote:A few questions for people at NJS/in the fleet already:

1) When did you get your first duty station?

2) Did you get any time off between NJS and reporting to your first assignment to house hunt?

3) Can you leave the immediate area during NJS?


1. It varies based on the Detailer. I knew mine before ods, but not long before. I can't recall how soon before I found out, but I remember being contacted by my sponsor while I was still home waiting to head out.

2. You get your base travel time, which is based on how far away Newport is from your base. Usually about 4 ish days. Any time you take after that is charged as leave. You can get house hunting liberty but you have to ask for it and it's subject to command approval.

3. Yes, but there is a limit you can't go beyond without submitting a chit. It's just a simple form and everyone's get approved. You can basically go wherever you want just have a reasonable plan to get back in time. NYC etc. Boston was within the limit, no chit required. It's a good opportunity to travel!

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby lexineffx » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:37 pm

I'd love to know how you liked your first duty station since i'm about to choose my first; did you think the first tour rotation was interesting? Any tips to a newbie? I'm going to re-post this on other comments but thank you in advance!

shintopig wrote:
S. Goodman wrote:Have you found out which duty station you've been assigned to? When did you find out?


The duty stations for the JAGs in my ODS class were assigned around week 4. Everyone got calls from the detailer within an hour or so of each other. Lots of anxious JAGs in the days leading up to the news.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby SCOAngers » Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:55 pm

twenty wrote:It's also worth pointing out that although former interns were 7% of the applicant pool, they were 40% of the selects. I wouldn't be at all surprised if almost everyone who completed a summer internship with Navy and applied got a slot.



I just graduated last month and studying for the bar, but I'm currently a Navy JAG alternate and I'm curious about my chances. I was made alternate back in April, just completed my MEPS exam, and stuck in this limbo. My recruiter told me my chances were really good but I'm not sure if he knew what he was talking about. BUPERS document online says chances are "VERY HIGH" (their all-caps). I was never an intern there.

Any info is greatly appreciated.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby rockosmodernlife » Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:25 am

SCOAngers wrote:
twenty wrote:It's also worth pointing out that although former interns were 7% of the applicant pool, they were 40% of the selects. I wouldn't be at all surprised if almost everyone who completed a summer internship with Navy and applied got a slot.



I just graduated last month and studying for the bar, but I'm currently a Navy JAG alternate and I'm curious about my chances. I was made alternate back in April, just completed my MEPS exam, and stuck in this limbo. My recruiter told me my chances were really good but I'm not sure if he knew what he was talking about. BUPERS document online says chances are "VERY HIGH" (their all-caps). I was never an intern there.

Any info is greatly appreciated.


You should probably expect to be in limbo for awhile. While there are always people that get DQ'd for medical purposes, it's not guaranteed, and who knows how many other alternates there are. The recruiter likely has no insight into your chances....as all of the accessions is handled between Millington and DC (I think mostly DC now). Remember that if you do get a spot, geographic preferences are decided in order or commissioning, so be prepared to get a less desirable location that might not be on the top of your list.

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby SCOAngers » Thu Jun 21, 2018 1:54 pm

S. Goodman wrote:
MichaelGScott wrote:
S. Goodman wrote:I always post them, look back through the forum.

I've found the ones from the last few years, I was referring to the selection rates for the one just released, which I do not think have been posted.


They were just sent out today. See below:

"Recruiting the right team is the foundation of a successful future for our Corps. Building a JAG Corps that is rich in integrity, quality, and diversity is only possible through sustained involvement with law students and leaders in the legal community. Your superb efforts make the Navy JAG Corps an employer of choice as evidenced by the results of the most recent accession selection board.

The Spring 2018 Accession Selection Board was held 20-23 March 2018. The board was composed of . . . [JAG Officers].

The board used the ''whole person" concept to select a diverse team of highly qualified applicants possessing the highest potential! For JAG Corps service. Although strong academic credentials were 'important, board members equally considered an applicant's demonstrated Leadership skills, work experience, quality of character and ability to overcome adversity; motivation, cultural expertise, performance in the structured interview, public service, and\prior military service. The successful completion of a Navy JAG Corps internship or externship was also given favorable consideration.

This board professionally recommended 58 Student program and Direct appointment Program candidates from a pool of 316 impressive applicants for a selection rate of 18%. The class includes 28 women and 30 men from various backgrounds representing 49 different law schools. Our future. colleagues are those who continue the academic and intellectual reputation of. The Navy JAG Corps by having participated in moot court and mock trial competitions, as well as having served as editors for law review and other law school journals. They speak-a host of languages including Jal!8Dese ,Vietnamese, Arabic, Korean, Punjabi and Mandarin and have members of college volleyball, lacrosse, and baseball teams.

Thirteen of our future judge advocates have prior military experience and have completed deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan, and throughout the Pacific. Other individuals have worked for AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps, and as a human rights attorney in Mexico. They have assisted with disaster relief in Puerto Rico, served as a Public Affairs intern in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and as a sergeant in the Orange County Sheriff's office. The diversity of skills and backgrounds these impressive candidates bring to the table will strengthen the ability of the JAG Corps to provide superb legal solutions across the full spectrum of missions and operational environments. · ·

Recruiting in the JAG Corps is an all-hands effort, and judge advocates continue to do an incredible job of reaching the very best talent.”

So it definitely looks like applications are down and selection rates are up. Most likely due to the improving economy and the fact that much better jobs are more readily available. That is what we're seeing on active duty as well. A lot of people are leaving after 4-8 years to get a better job once they get that entry level experience out of the way.


Does that include alternates or is it just the primary selectees?

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Re: Military Law - Navy Jag Student Program

Postby JAGbound » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:02 pm

Greetings all!

I'm currently gathering materials for a Fall 2018 application and had a few questions I was hoping someone could answer.

1) Was there a specific format required for the letters of rec? Specifically, the Navy JAG site says the following:

Letters should be addressed to the "President of the JAGC Accessions Board". The following address should ONLY be used for letterhead:

Office of the Judge Advocate General
Attn: JAGC Accessions Officer
1322 Patterson Ave., Suite 3000
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5066

Does that mean the address above needs to be on the top of the header? I was hoping my recommendations could have the letterhead of the respective office of the recommender.

2) I've heard it is less likely a 2L will get picked up the first go around (obviously case-by-case basis), but does anyone have any hard numbers on how many 2Ls the Board picks up on average? Percentage?

Thanks!



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