After Grades - What did we learn?

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SoxyPirate
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby SoxyPirate » Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:37 am

eth3n wrote:What did we learn?

The best Christmas present is hearing that the biggest gunner in class got a B.


This shit right here.

Jenaimarre
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Jenaimarre » Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:29 am

I think I've learned that you really just have to trust your instincts and realize what study habits work for you. By the time you get to law school, you've already done well at other things academically, so just continue to do what you've always done. Don't get psyched out by other people and their 85 hornbooks and 13 sets of flash cards, and outlines passed down from the past 25 years.

Our school spread exams over two weeks, with exams being on Tuesday and Friday. I essentially used the time between exams to get my act/outlines together.

Civ Pro--3 units--B: This was open book, and frankly just difficult for me. 3 hours for 30 multiple choice questions and 1 hour for an essay. I tabbed my rule book and as well as my casebook and just did the best I could. I did go to class everyday, took notes, and tried to make some sort of outline, but having heard that on the previous year's exam the average multiple choice score was 11/30, I decided my efforts would be better spent elsewhere. I did do about 3-5 essay questions, but not sure it really helped. I wish I had perhaps focused more, but at least this class taught me to identify my weakest class early on and react accordingly.

Con Law--4 Units--A-: This was a closed book exam. This was the only class I started outlining before exam period. I started my outline at Fall Break and from there on, I just updated it at the end of the semester. I went to class everyday, took notes, and tried to actively participate. I used Chemerinsky to fill in any gaps I did not understand. I took 3 full length practice tests.

Contracts--3 Units--A-: This was open book for us. 90 minutes for 40 multiple choice questions and 90 minutes for 2 essay questions. Again, I went to class everyday, took notes, and tried to actively participate. I made a table with all of the theories of obligations as well as the defenses to those. I also made a calculations table so that in a panic I could just plug numbers into a formula without thinking in order to get what the potential damages might be. I used the Hillman Hornbook to fill in any gaps. I also tabbed the Hornbook and Casebook because I thought during the essay portion if there was time to look up case names, that might help me get some extra points.

Torts--4 Units--A: This was a closed book exam and was my last final on the final Friday of exam period. Same routine with going to class everyday and actively participating. On Tuesday evening I simply started going through my class notes making and an outline for myself based on that. Oddly, I didn't use any hornbook or study aid and this was my best grade. I think this might go back to my theory of trusting your instincts.

I got an A- in writing as well, but honestly, I think that class is such a crapshoot that you can't take anything away from it other than "trust your instincts."

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como
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby como » Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:51 am

Jenaimarre...those look pretty good, especially the torts grade. I just rode the curve on that one. Somehow, I aced civ pro. I guess all that reading about detinue paid off... My best grades were in our year-long courses, but I somehow doubt they will have any necessary correlation to next semester. You thinking of transferring? You can pm me or fb me..

Anónimo
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Anónimo » Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:42 pm

Class rank after first semester: top 5%.
Lowest grade was a B+; highest grade was an A. Curve is a 2.7.

I didn't really do any substantive prep for 1L, though I originally wanted to. At this point, I would advise against it; I don't think it would have helped me at all, and I actually think it would have hurt in a couple of my classes given some professors' particularity. I did read 1L, as well as The Paperchase, Ivy Briefs, and Lawyer Boy. Those were all just fun books, though... I don't think they had anything to do with my grades. I also read every single thread I could find on this site about doing well in law school, and I think that really helped. I feel like I went into 1st semester with a solid plan in place, which put me ahead of the game at the beginning.

I also read Law School Confidential and followed the highlighting system with a couple of modifications. I didn't use the binders like he suggested; I just did everything in One Note. I had a One Note notebook for each class and color-coded my notes based on different categories like, "test material," "professor's opinion," "definitions," "policy matters," etc. When I outlined, I was able to plug notes in based on the color coding, which made things go a lot faster. I then color-coded my outlines based on cases, statutes, professor tips, policy matters, and important topics and sub-topics. I also tabbed my books all term based on the table of contents, so that I could easily reference certain sections when outlining or studying. On open book tests, this was incredibly valuable, since I was able to reference sections of the text without using a lot of extra time.

I kept up with everything throughout the term, and was probably putting in 14 hour days or so including classes (actual studying - I didn't waste time on FB, TLS, etc. during the term). I did take weekends off completely except for 3-5 hours Sunday nights, when I would complete my work for Monday's classes and get a head start on Tuesday's assignments. I know there is a lot of advice discounting the casebooks, but I think that the assigned reading is where I gained probably 3/4 of my understanding of the material. I book-briefed using the LSC method, which took a lot less time than writing out briefs, but I was still interacting with the assigned material daily, which I think is important to success. As far as any study plans go, I mostly followed Xeoh's advice, though I didn't commute, so I had extra time for sleep. I slept about 6 hours a night all semester, and it suited me well. I didn't pull a single all-nighter. Because I was spreading the work out daily, instead of cramming it in around finals, I also noticed that I was visibly less stressed than a lot of my classmates, which I think helped a lot during exams.

I didn't join a study group. I knew going in that I didn't like group work, as I had been burned repeatedly by group projects in undergrad. I ended up working with a study partner, which I found to be really helpful. We mostly just studied quietly together, and we would ask each other questions if we were confused. I ended up being a "big picture" person while my partner was a "details" person. Because of this contrast in style, we were able to glean quite a bit from each other's outlines, which was helpful for exams.

I didn't do LEEWS. I didn't do PLS. I did every single practice test offered by every single professor. I also started my outlines in October, finished them around Thanksgiving, and just worked on memorizing them after that. Above all else, I definitely suggest making your own outlines. I read a few key chapters in Getting To Maybe, but I never read the whole thing. I plan to this semester.

I didn't use canned briefs or commercial outlines at all. I didn't use supplements extensively - I just looked at them for the problems and if I was confused on something. I did have them accessible, though, since I purchased everything before school started using Lishi's thread as a guide. The supplements I accessed at one point or another for my substantive classes are as follows:

Crim: I used Dressler's Sum and Substance and Understanding Criminal Law. Dressler was fantastic, and I highly recommend his materials. I used the E&E for a couple of things, but didn't really like the Crim one that much. I took almost all of the relevant CALI lessons during the reading period before exams. CALI is a great resource, and one I highly recommend. I also used a couple of outlines from 2Ls who I knew had done well to help me make my own outline. I don't think I would have used them if I didn't know ahead of time that their writers had received good grades.

Contracts: I used Chirelstein and CALI. I used the E&E for a couple of problems throughout the course, but didn't access it often. The Contracts E&E just wasn't as useful as I had hoped it would be. I loved the Law in a Flash cards for this course, and found them to be really helpful. I also used Siegel's and the Finz books for exam prep; we had mixed MC and essay questions. The Siegel's essays were much easier than the exam essays were, though, and I would use them only if you've taken as many full-length practice exams as possible and are still looking for additional practice.

Civ Pro: I used Glannon's E&E, which I really liked. I did several CALI lessons, though not as many as I did for Crim and Contracts. I watched the BAR/BRI 1L Civ Pro videos. I would say that Glannon is basically necessary; CALI is okay; and BAR/BRI is recommended for those who have joined BAR/BRI and have access to the videos. I personally found them to be beneficial for condensing the information prior to outlining and the exam.

Torts: I used Glannon's E&E, Mastering Torts, and CALI. I really like Glannon's E&E, including the practice exams at the back of the book. CALI was alright for Torts, but I didn't find it as helpful for this class as it was for others. The Law in a Flash cards were good for this class. Mastering Torts was great for a few negligence issues that were evasive otherwise, and I would say that book was a close 2d to Glannon as far as study aids for Torts go. I used Siegel's for exam prep. Like Contracts, the Torts Siegel's was much easier than the actual exams, but it was good for practice after I had completed the professor's full-length practice exams.

Overall, I am pleased with my performance and plan to follow the same system next semester, with a couple of changes. I will probably access supplements slightly more often, just to ensure that my understanding of the topic being covered is up to par. I will also try to finish my class reading a couple of weeks before exams. Though I had my outlines up-to-date about two weeks prior to the exam period, it was a hassle reading for class and updating my outlines until the reading period started. I would rather be ahead of the game and able to spend all of my time on practice exams. Though I completed all of the practice exams provided for my classes, an extra week would have given me time to complete those linked in this forum and go through the Siegel's exercises I skipped.

I hope this helps. I was hesitant to post due to the anonymity factor, but these threads were invaluable for me last year, and I'd like to continue the advice. If there are specific questions, please feel free to PM me.

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mac.empress
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby mac.empress » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:00 pm

SoxyPirate wrote:The LSAT messed up on me.



You do not belong. Go away so I can wallow in my depression in peace.

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KMaine
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby KMaine » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:01 pm

Jennaimarre - 1. Are you in Como's/my section? 2. Why are you such a legal genius?

Jenaimarre wrote:I think I've learned that you really just have to trust your instincts and realize what study habits work for you. By the time you get to law school, you've already done well at other things academically, so just continue to do what you've always done. Don't get psyched out by other people and their 85 hornbooks and 13 sets of flash cards, and outlines passed down from the past 25 years.

Our school spread exams over two weeks, with exams being on Tuesday and Friday. I essentially used the time between exams to get my act/outlines together.

Civ Pro--3 units--B: This was open book, and frankly just difficult for me. 3 hours for 30 multiple choice questions and 1 hour for an essay. I tabbed my rule book and as well as my casebook and just did the best I could. I did go to class everyday, took notes, and tried to make some sort of outline, but having heard that on the previous year's exam the average multiple choice score was 11/30, I decided my efforts would be better spent elsewhere. I did do about 3-5 essay questions, but not sure it really helped. I wish I had perhaps focused more, but at least this class taught me to identify my weakest class early on and react accordingly.

Con Law--4 Units--A-: This was a closed book exam. This was the only class I started outlining before exam period. I started my outline at Fall Break and from there on, I just updated it at the end of the semester. I went to class everyday, took notes, and tried to actively participate. I used Chemerinsky to fill in any gaps I did not understand. I took 3 full length practice tests.

Contracts--3 Units--A-: This was open book for us. 90 minutes for 40 multiple choice questions and 90 minutes for 2 essay questions. Again, I went to class everyday, took notes, and tried to actively participate. I made a table with all of the theories of obligations as well as the defenses to those. I also made a calculations table so that in a panic I could just plug numbers into a formula without thinking in order to get what the potential damages might be. I used the Hillman Hornbook to fill in any gaps. I also tabbed the Hornbook and Casebook because I thought during the essay portion if there was time to look up case names, that might help me get some extra points.

Torts--4 Units--A: This was a closed book exam and was my last final on the final Friday of exam period. Same routine with going to class everyday and actively participating. On Tuesday evening I simply started going through my class notes making and an outline for myself based on that. Oddly, I didn't use any hornbook or study aid and this was my best grade. I think this might go back to my theory of trusting your instincts.

I got an A- in writing as well, but honestly, I think that class is such a crapshoot that you can't take anything away from it other than "trust your instincts."

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Lermontov
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Lermontov » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:04 pm

Tag

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mac.empress
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby mac.empress » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:11 pm

That the dynamic in school changes once people have grades. Those who seemed smart may not have done well and those we considered stupider than us may have aced it.

Crim - B+ - I swore I did better but then I remembered that I took a risk and it didn't pay off as much as I had hoped. I'm going to have the grade reviewed since I'm only 1 away from A- though.

Lesson: You have to study the whole course and not just parts. And ignore all the retards who say you sound really bright. I was happy with this grade for one whole day. Until the next grade came out.

Legal Systems - C - I studied a bit of everything and nothing in detail. This is what happens when you buy no books for school. It makes me slightly depressed as well. Fuck! A C?

Lesson: No matter how good you feel, you should go study some more.

All my other classes are 0.00 credits.

I'm gonna really have to step it up this semester in order to get scholarship money. Apparently, going out during school has to be severely reduced. *Sigh* My tummy hurts.

trickydicky
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby trickydicky » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:52 pm

Here is the break down of how I prepared for exams.

Pre Law school- I totally read all the E and E's for Civ Pro and Torts. then i went through all the sum and substance cd's for crim, property, civ pro, and barbri lectures for torts as well as pmbr lectures. Also read LEEWS twice (did not find it very helpful) and read Getting to Maybe twice.

I felt that I had a huge leg up on everyone when I went in to class the first day.

Torts - A - Our prof had this thing set up as a total racehorse exam. I had to make sure that I did not go into too much detail for fear of running out of time. The test was pretty easy but the thing that set me apart was a threw in a lot of policy nuggets that hit the teachers G spot. I would go to law reviews on policy aspects that I thought that I would find on the test. The only way to figure these out was to pay attention in class, not jack around on facebook.

Criminal Law- A - (and I had the highest grade in this class) This is such an easy class I do not know how anyone can screw this class up. The only thing that made it hard was that our teacher did not know the crimes so it made it a big guessing game. The elements of crimes are pretty simple and straightforward, just know them and apply them. I read LaFave's hornbook and Dressler's Outline and Treatise. All three of these books are solid gold. The thing that set me apart was I new the differences between MPC, modern common law and old common law. Since I can type so fast I was able to draw all the distinctions. Also, Dressler's policy rationalizations are pure gold. Another thing, if there was a death, I would analzye it all the way though every distinction of murder (intent to kill, depraved heart, intent to cause serious bodily inury, and felony murder), then I would go through the statuory murder steps, then I would look at manslaughter and analyze that.

Civ Pro- A (and I had the highest grade in the class) - this class you must know the rules COLD. There is no way to get around it. My teacher was a stickler on the rules and I had them pretty much memorized before I went into the exam. All that I needed to do was look at the FRCP to doublcheck that I had them down right. We had a bunch of questions on the joinder rules so you need to know how to apply them cold. It is easy to understand the differnce between impleader and 13(h) and cross claims in the abstract but to apply them on the test is more difficult. Read the E and E.

Property - A - you must know estates and future interests cold!! I cannot stress that one enough. They can be tricky and also they can be a huge time suck in an exam which is a recipe for disaster. The RAP is tough at first, I was confused but if you continually hammer it you should have no trouble spotting it and applying it. Adverse Possession is pretty straightforward too, just apply the different elements -- nothing too tricky there.

Legal Writing - A - highest grade - put in a ton of work so that the grammar is perfect. Other than that I think that it is a crap shoot. Really... I think that classes that grade Legal Writing are totally screwed up.


Other things- there is no recipe for domination in law school. I shared outlines with other students that came from 2L's and 3L's that destroyed the course. I ended up with good grades while they struggled to even make median. It comes down to putting in the time, being smart, and being able to make crazy arguments on the fly.

I was shocked at how little people study in law school. Everyone does the assigned reading but few actually put in the "pain" to get to the very top. I still had time to have a ton of fun in law school, but I rarely screwed around. I worked out every day but when I worked out I listened to study aides or reviewed my notes during cardio.

It takes 100% commitment to get to the top but know that you can still have fun.

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OperaSoprano
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby OperaSoprano » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:55 pm

Danteshek wrote:
JSUVA2012 wrote:
Danteshek wrote:
eye wrote:I would love to see some more action in this thread..

:roll:


I think embarrassment is the main reason people are not sharing


A bunch of us are at UVA, and all know each other or are acquainted to some degree. That makes things super awkward.


I really don't understand why people are so secretive. The truth will come out eventually about one's performance.

Btw my Dad went to UVA Law in the early 70's and almost flunked out 1L. Don't follow in his footsteps... He quit law at 28 after working DOJ Civil Rights to become a professional opera singer.


Your dad = epic win.

I'm another one who can't be perfectly forthcoming, for reasons of non-anonymity. Keeping my damnfool mouth shut is not something I excel at naturally, hence the non-anonymity in the first place. Anyway, I only have one grade back, and it could be a fluke. When the other arrives, I will have a better sense of where I really stand.

I spent a good twenty minutes outlining my answer on the first final (Crim), and panicked hardcore that I hadn't left myself enough time to write, so I trimmed my prep time in half for Contracts, and just made a bunch of notes in the margins of the question. Even so, I failed to break 4,000 words on either exam, so I had to make every one count.

I do have hope to offer other slow typists. I can hit 55 wpm, but only for a few minutes. My normal speed is probably down around 40 wpm, and quite often less than that. :oops: I was helped somewhat on the first exam by the fact that it was 1/4 multiple choice. After taking about a million MC practice tests (CrunchTime was quite useful for this) I was able to quickly finish this part and get on to to the hypo. I just remember being in the Crim Law zone, and emerging three hours from the start time in a daze. If you'd asked me at that point what I had seen and done, I would not have had a coherent answer. I only know that I was not the fastest in the class, so it stands to reason that I did not write the most. Otherwise, I adhered as closely as possible to Arrow's principles of exam mastery. I used headings, and had pre-memorized definitions of things like felony murder, which I knew would come up. I tried to be exhaustive, and at least mention everything that might fit the facts, even if I lacked time for tons of in depth analysis. I explained why, as best as I could. I think a lay person, reading my answer, would have been able to understand it.

I think the most crucial thing I did was to decompress before beginning. I spent the final moments before my first ever law school exam listening to the soundtrack from RENT. I made my peace with friends and family members before going in there. For a few short hours, all the panic fell away.

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apper123
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby apper123 » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:57 pm

trickydicky wrote:Here is the break down of how I prepared for exams.

Pre Law school- I totally read all the E and E's for Civ Pro and Torts. then i went through all the sum and substance cd's for crim, property, civ pro, and barbri lectures for torts as well as pmbr lectures. Also read LEEWS twice (did not find it very helpful) and read Getting to Maybe twice.

I felt that I had a huge leg up on everyone when I went in to class the first day.

Torts - A - Our prof had this thing set up as a total racehorse exam. I had to make sure that I did not go into too much detail for fear of running out of time. The test was pretty easy but the thing that set me apart was a threw in a lot of policy nuggets that hit the teachers G spot. I would go to law reviews on policy aspects that I thought that I would find on the test. The only way to figure these out was to pay attention in class, not jack around on facebook.

Criminal Law- A - (and I had the highest grade in this class) This is such an easy class I do not know how anyone can screw this class up. The only thing that made it hard was that our teacher did not know the crimes so it made it a big guessing game. The elements of crimes are pretty simple and straightforward, just know them and apply them. I read LaFave's hornbook and Dressler's Outline and Treatise. All three of these books are solid gold. The thing that set me apart was I new the differences between MPC, modern common law and old common law. Since I can type so fast I was able to draw all the distinctions. Also, Dressler's policy rationalizations are pure gold. Another thing, if there was a death, I would analzye it all the way though every distinction of murder (intent to kill, depraved heart, intent to cause serious bodily inury, and felony murder), then I would go through the statuory murder steps, then I would look at manslaughter and analyze that.

Civ Pro- A (and I had the highest grade in the class) - this class you must know the rules COLD. There is no way to get around it. My teacher was a stickler on the rules and I had them pretty much memorized before I went into the exam. All that I needed to do was look at the FRCP to doublcheck that I had them down right. We had a bunch of questions on the joinder rules so you need to know how to apply them cold. It is easy to understand the differnce between impleader and 13(h) and cross claims in the abstract but to apply them on the test is more difficult. Read the E and E.

Property - A - you must know estates and future interests cold!! I cannot stress that one enough. They can be tricky and also they can be a huge time suck in an exam which is a recipe for disaster. The RAP is tough at first, I was confused but if you continually hammer it you should have no trouble spotting it and applying it. Adverse Possession is pretty straightforward too, just apply the different elements -- nothing too tricky there.

Legal Writing - A - highest grade - put in a ton of work so that the grammar is perfect. Other than that I think that it is a crap shoot. Really... I think that classes that grade Legal Writing are totally screwed up.


Other things- there is no recipe for domination in law school. I shared outlines with other students that came from 2L's and 3L's that destroyed the course. I ended up with good grades while they struggled to even make median. It comes down to putting in the time, being smart, and being able to make crazy arguments on the fly.

I was shocked at how little people study in law school. Everyone does the assigned reading but few actually put in the "pain" to get to the very top. I still had time to have a ton of fun in law school, but I rarely screwed around. I worked out every day but when I worked out I listened to study aides or reviewed my notes during cardio.

It takes 100% commitment to get to the top but know that you can still have fun.


Holy crap congratulations man. Amazing semester. May I ask where your school is ranked?

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babaghanouj
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby babaghanouj » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:59 pm

tagged

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eye
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby eye » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:07 pm

apper123 wrote:
Holy crap congratulations man. Amazing semester. May I ask where your school is ranked?


According to his posts, top of Tier II school.

trickydicky
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby trickydicky » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:10 pm

apper123 wrote:
trickydicky wrote:Here is the break down of how I prepared for exams.

Pre Law school- I totally read all the E and E's for Civ Pro and Torts. then i went through all the sum and substance cd's for crim, property, civ pro, and barbri lectures for torts as well as pmbr lectures. Also read LEEWS twice (did not find it very helpful) and read Getting to Maybe twice.

I felt that I had a huge leg up on everyone when I went in to class the first day.

Torts - A - Our prof had this thing set up as a total racehorse exam. I had to make sure that I did not go into too much detail for fear of running out of time. The test was pretty easy but the thing that set me apart was a threw in a lot of policy nuggets that hit the teachers G spot. I would go to law reviews on policy aspects that I thought that I would find on the test. The only way to figure these out was to pay attention in class, not jack around on facebook.

Criminal Law- A - (and I had the highest grade in this class) This is such an easy class I do not know how anyone can screw this class up. The only thing that made it hard was that our teacher did not know the crimes so it made it a big guessing game. The elements of crimes are pretty simple and straightforward, just know them and apply them. I read LaFave's hornbook and Dressler's Outline and Treatise. All three of these books are solid gold. The thing that set me apart was I new the differences between MPC, modern common law and old common law. Since I can type so fast I was able to draw all the distinctions. Also, Dressler's policy rationalizations are pure gold. Another thing, if there was a death, I would analzye it all the way though every distinction of murder (intent to kill, depraved heart, intent to cause serious bodily inury, and felony murder), then I would go through the statuory murder steps, then I would look at manslaughter and analyze that.

Civ Pro- A (and I had the highest grade in the class) - this class you must know the rules COLD. There is no way to get around it. My teacher was a stickler on the rules and I had them pretty much memorized before I went into the exam. All that I needed to do was look at the FRCP to doublcheck that I had them down right. We had a bunch of questions on the joinder rules so you need to know how to apply them cold. It is easy to understand the differnce between impleader and 13(h) and cross claims in the abstract but to apply them on the test is more difficult. Read the E and E.

Property - A - you must know estates and future interests cold!! I cannot stress that one enough. They can be tricky and also they can be a huge time suck in an exam which is a recipe for disaster. The RAP is tough at first, I was confused but if you continually hammer it you should have no trouble spotting it and applying it. Adverse Possession is pretty straightforward too, just apply the different elements -- nothing too tricky there.

Legal Writing - A - highest grade - put in a ton of work so that the grammar is perfect. Other than that I think that it is a crap shoot. Really... I think that classes that grade Legal Writing are totally screwed up.


Other things- there is no recipe for domination in law school. I shared outlines with other students that came from 2L's and 3L's that destroyed the course. I ended up with good grades while they struggled to even make median. It comes down to putting in the time, being smart, and being able to make crazy arguments on the fly.

I was shocked at how little people study in law school. Everyone does the assigned reading but few actually put in the "pain" to get to the very top. I still had time to have a ton of fun in law school, but I rarely screwed around. I worked out every day but when I worked out I listened to study aides or reviewed my notes during cardio.

It takes 100% commitment to get to the top but know that you can still have fun.


Holy crap congratulations man. Amazing semester. May I ask where your school is ranked?





My school is ranked in the 60's. I would totally out myself if I gave away which school because TLS has not really caught on there. I decided to take a full scholarship instead of going to two schools that I was accepted to in the 30's. For what its worth, I only had a 163 on my LSAT.

Snooker
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Snooker » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:25 pm

JSUVA2012 wrote:
Danteshek wrote:
eye wrote:I would love to see some more action in this thread..

:roll:


I think embarrassment is the main reason people are not sharing


A bunch of us are at UVA, and all know each other or are acquainted to some degree. That makes things super awkward.


yeah this is a good point for a lot of schools actually, unless you live in a great shroud of anonymity

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Objection
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Objection » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:40 pm

The test was pretty easy but the thing that set me apart was a threw in a lot of policy nuggets that hit the teachers G spot.


This is such an easy class I do not know how anyone can screw this class up.


Since I can type so fast


:roll:

trickydicky
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby trickydicky » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:55 pm

Objection wrote:
The test was pretty easy but the thing that set me apart was a threw in a lot of policy nuggets that hit the teachers G spot.


This is such an easy class I do not know how anyone can screw this class up.


Since I can type so fast


:roll:



haha. I guess that came off a little cocky.

With criminal law, really. You just need to hit all the elements of the crimes and make sure to talk about all the crimes. I found that CrimLaw was the hardest test to organize. You need to hit actus reus, mens rea, causation, concurrence, etc. It takes a long time and people rush it, fall behind on time, and then miss a couple of hidden crimes. That is the difference between an A and a B+/B. Not a huge difference.


And typing fast does help. When I am writing for the first time I am not the most succinct writer. If a paragraph was not properly constructed I woudl just go ahead and keep typing.


**one more key detail, you must keep your head about you on the exam and not panic. I think that it is inevitable that you are going to write things down incorrectly. On two of my exams I wrote completely the right answer because I misinterpreted one word. A guy violated a civil rights act but after going through it the second time I recognized that the "victim" was not actually effected by the violation. I wrote this huge paragraph saying how the civil rights act was violated. Instead of erasing the whole paragraph which I was about to do, I inserted one short paragraph that said but "since the victim did not....." i was able to save the issue. (in reality I did a great job of analzying both sides of the issue but that was mostly luck.



Another thing, a lot to law school exams is guessing what your profs are going to test on and getting lucky about that

happy19
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby happy19 » Wed Jan 13, 2010 3:06 pm

tag

agumon
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby agumon » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:02 pm

mac.empress wrote:Those who seemed smart may not have done well and those we considered stupider than us may have aced it.


This. I am still reeling after finding out who did well.. never underestimate anyone, wow.

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apper123
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby apper123 » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:04 pm

agumon wrote:
mac.empress wrote:Those who seemed smart may not have done well and those we considered stupider than us may have aced it.


This. I am still reeling after finding out who did well.. never underestimate anyone, wow.


How do you find this out? Do people openly discuss grades in the schools you guys go to? I've had a couple people ask me my Property grade (the only grade we've officially received yet), and I simply respond "I did well enough." I feel like if I say I got an A (which I did), word will get around and people who get it 3rd or 4th hand will scorn me for "bragging" even though all I did was answer a question.

Obviously I post them here because no one IRL knows me on here, none of you guys are likely to care and no one from my school posts here anyways.

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mac.empress
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby mac.empress » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:13 pm

apper123 wrote:
agumon wrote:
mac.empress wrote:Those who seemed smart may not have done well and those we considered stupider than us may have aced it.


This. I am still reeling after finding out who did well.. never underestimate anyone, wow.


How do you find this out? Do people openly discuss grades in the schools you guys go to? I've had a couple people ask me my Property grade (the only grade we've officially received yet), and I simply respond "I did well enough." I feel like if I say I got an A (which I did), word will get around and people who get it 3rd or 4th hand will scorn me for "bragging" even though all I did was answer a question.

Obviously I post them here because no one IRL knows me on here, none of you guys are likely to care and no one from my school posts here anyways.


My response is, "I'm very happy" and that is all. But people have been randomly telling me their grades. Last night, I'm in a club, a girl runs up to me. "Hi, I got an A in Crim, what'd you get?" Those are the assholes I go to school with.

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TTT-LS
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby TTT-LS » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:45 pm

.
Last edited by TTT-LS on Mon Jul 05, 2010 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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JazzOne
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby JazzOne » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:54 pm

TTT-LS wrote:
JazzOne wrote:Now that grades are out, I know that I'll have to work much harder next semester. I still don't have my LR&LW grade though.

Best of luck in the new semester man. For all my hating re: Law Preview, I still root for you and the other regulars.

Thanks. I also root for TLSers. However, the fact that I intend to work harder next semester should not be construed to mean that I did poorly last semester. I honestly believe that Law Preview helped, and I literally could not be happier with my grades thus far.

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OperaSoprano
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby OperaSoprano » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:57 pm

agumon wrote:
mac.empress wrote:Those who seemed smart may not have done well and those we considered stupider than us may have aced it.


This. I am still reeling after finding out who did well.. never underestimate anyone, wow.


This is excellent advice. In truth, though, when it comes to my classmates' grades, ignorance is bliss.

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Objection
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Re: After Grades - What did we learn?

Postby Objection » Wed Jan 13, 2010 5:00 pm

I'm so glad we don't have real grades. So glad.




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