Flashcards

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Easy-E
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Flashcards

Postby Easy-E » Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:30 pm

I've always found the creation and use of flashcards to be very helpful in studying for exams. I know people use them for law school, but since I'm totally clueless, I was wondering how those of you that utilized them did so, when to start making them, and how useful you actually found them to be for law school. Feel free to post reasons NOT to use them as well. I know their are pre-made ones, but I've always found actually writing them to be very usueful.

Macarthur
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Re: Flashcards

Postby Macarthur » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:17 pm

What worked for me was writing the term or principle, on the back a definition or short explanation i knew i could remember easily, any exceptions, and an example if it fit. I always tried to boil it down as much as possible without losing substance

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rinkrat19
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Re: Flashcards

Postby rinkrat19 » Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:10 pm

I got the Law in a Flash flashcards for a couple of 1L subjects (torts and property, I think?) and found them moderately useful for when I felt like I should be doing something but wasn't quite in the mood to get out my books.

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Tiago Splitter
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Re: Flashcards

Postby Tiago Splitter » Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:00 pm

I agree that making them yourself is the way to go. They were especially useful in my torts class, which had a closed book final. But even for open book classes you should basically put parts of your outline into flashcards so you have it down cold. One good thing to put on are the various "tests" that courts use for different things, or the different steps in an analysis for something like personal jurisdiction or choice of law.

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smaug_
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Re: Flashcards

Postby smaug_ » Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:05 pm

Tiago Splitter wrote:I agree that making them yourself is the way to go. They were especially useful in my torts class, which had a closed book final. But even for open book classes you should basically put parts of your outline into flashcards so you have it down cold. One good thing to put on are the various "tests" that courts use for different things, or the different steps in an analysis for something like personal jurisdiction or choice of law.


I made flashcards as well and I think they helped. By the time you're done you'll be able to know the information so your outline can just be a list of cases/checklist to run through rather than substantive information.

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Easy-E
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Re: Flashcards

Postby Easy-E » Fri Oct 04, 2013 10:21 am

Tiago Splitter wrote:I agree that making them yourself is the way to go. They were especially useful in my torts class, which had a closed book final. But even for open book classes you should basically put parts of your outline into flashcards so you have it down cold. One good thing to put on are the various "tests" that courts use for different things, or the different steps in an analysis for something like personal jurisdiction or choice of law.



Yeah that's what I figured, torts seems especially well suited for that. I gotta do something for property, closed book (best professor though). Thanks man.

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Easy-E
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Re: Flashcards

Postby Easy-E » Fri Oct 04, 2013 10:23 am

hibiki wrote:
Tiago Splitter wrote:I agree that making them yourself is the way to go. They were especially useful in my torts class, which had a closed book final. But even for open book classes you should basically put parts of your outline into flashcards so you have it down cold. One good thing to put on are the various "tests" that courts use for different things, or the different steps in an analysis for something like personal jurisdiction or choice of law.


I made flashcards as well and I think they helped. By the time you're done you'll be able to know the information so your outline can just be a list of cases/checklist to run through rather than substantive information.



That's what I'm hoping to put together. Don't need to spend time looking up every detail.

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skw
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Re: Flashcards

Postby skw » Fri Oct 04, 2013 11:01 am

I like flash card machine - they have an iPhone app and a nice website. It is free.




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