really starting to feel out of it now

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sangr
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Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:45 pm

really starting to feel out of it now

Postby sangr » Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:15 pm

thanks all
Last edited by sangr on Tue Jun 04, 2013 3:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

Kage3212
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby Kage3212 » Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:39 pm

I feel similarly.

We recently had a midterm and it was all application of principles. It was almost worthless to have any knowledge of any cases. If you knew all the nuances of Contracts (intent to be bound, consideration, offer & acceptance, parol evidence rule, etc.) you were golden. Spending hours upon hours reading cases and briefing them didn't help a single bit. It allowed me to take a step back and truly realize that all that matters is applying the broad principles to a fact pattern, not all the minute details we get grilled on in class.

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barestin
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby barestin » Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:40 pm

What worked for me is just focusing on outlining and memorizing at this point in the semester, instead of putting too much of an emphasis in the readings. Get multiple good outlines for each class from former students who did well and conflate them into your own outlines. Making your own outline (no more than 40 pages for each class) will force you to slow down and really comprehend the material line-by-line before allowing yourself to put the information into your outline. Summarize any cases and hypos in a couple lines in your outline too (after listing the rules for their respective sections).

Cases are pretty much glorified hypos and you should understand how the rules interplayed with the facts to help you practice. However, do make sure you memorize your outlines, backwards and forwards so you can start taking complete practice tests weeks before the real thing and hopefully your professors will be willing to review them and give you feedback. This will be a long, painstaking process but you will come off much more prepared for your finals and it beats spending 4 hours trying to understand 10 pages of some 18th century property case.

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thesealocust
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby thesealocust » Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:58 pm

Stay in the fight.

Focus on outlines and practice exams - preparing obsessively for cold calls / briefing cases / reading hornbooks offer lower or substantially lower returns on your time investment.

Take time off if you need to in order to stay sane, but remember that working diligently 1L year can leave your next 2 years almost totally free for raging / lazing.

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nygrrrl
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby nygrrrl » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:36 pm

thesealocust wrote:Stay in the fight.

Focus on outlines and practice exams - preparing obsessively for cold calls / briefing cases / reading hornbooks offer lower or substantially lower returns on your time investment.

Take time off if you need to in order to stay sane, but remember that working diligently 1L year can leave your next 2 years almost totally free for raging / lazing.

Locust is right. Dedicate yourself now, the reward can be huge. Do the opposite? You can never get the time back.

swimmer11
Posts: 464
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:54 pm

Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby swimmer11 » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:43 pm

barestin wrote:What worked for me is just focusing on outlining and memorizing at this point in the semester, instead of putting too much of an emphasis in the readings. Get multiple good outlines for each class from former students who did well and conflate them into your own outlines. Making your own outline (no more than 40 pages for each class) will force you to slow down and really comprehend the material line-by-line before allowing yourself to put the information into your outline. Summarize any cases and hypos in a couple lines in your outline too (after listing the rules for their respective sections).

Cases are pretty much glorified hypos and you should understand how the rules interplayed with the facts to help you practice. However, do make sure you memorize your outlines, backwards and forwards so you can start taking complete practice tests weeks before the real thing and hopefully your professors will be willing to review them and give you feedback. This will be a long, painstaking process but you will come off much more prepared for your finals and it beats spending 4 hours trying to understand 10 pages of some 18th century property case.



When is the credited time to begin with practice exams and extensive practice with Hypos? I should be finished with my outlines by the end of this week. Separate question: I have a closed book torts exam and I have disregarded making an outline up to this point. Instead, I have been reading through the E and E, reading my casebook, and creating my own hypos to synthesized the rules and all the nitty bullshit involved in torts - is this credited? Or should I still make an outline? I was thinking of making an outline just for negligence to tie the broader points together because my teacher did not like to go in order and decided to bounce around between all different parts of it, confusing the fuck outta me (to a degree). However, I do have the outline for the class from the person who cali'd it last year so I am thinking of just memorizing their glorious outline. Any ideas, suggestions, on how to handle a closed book torts exam with a guaranteed policy question at the end?

NotMyRealName09
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby NotMyRealName09 » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:33 pm

You're more likely to make more money if you work really hard now, 1L year. Seriously, this is the money year. What other motivation do you need? $$$!

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thesealocust
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Re: really starting to feel out of it now

Postby thesealocust » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:54 pm

swimmer11 wrote:When is the credited time to begin with practice exams and extensive practice with Hypos? I should be finished with my outlines by the end of this week. Separate question: I have a closed book torts exam and I have disregarded making an outline up to this point. Instead, I have been reading through the E and E, reading my casebook, and creating my own hypos to synthesized the rules and all the nitty bullshit involved in torts - is this credited? Or should I still make an outline? I was thinking of making an outline just for negligence to tie the broader points together because my teacher did not like to go in order and decided to bounce around between all different parts of it, confusing the fuck outta me (to a degree). However, I do have the outline for the class from the person who cali'd it last year so I am thinking of just memorizing their glorious outline. Any ideas, suggestions, on how to handle a closed book torts exam with a guaranteed policy question at the end?


Right now is a good time to start practicing on exams and hypos. But remember: you need to learn how to answer a hypo well, you don't need to win the award for answering the most hypos. The key to practice tests is the quality of your experience and not the volume.

Is it a hypo that matches the content of the course? Once you answer it, do you digest it to try and learn what a prof will look for in grading? Did you compare your answer with other students answers to learn what mistakes you're making or things you're missing?

I would recommend outlining for your closed book course. The process forces you to process, summarize, condense, and organize information. This is a much more active way to learn what you need to know and have quick mental access to it on an exam than reading it all in an unprocessed form.

You can do great on an exam without making an outline, but as a 1L in the fall I wouldn't advise trying it that way first. Making the outline is an incredible tool for learning the material so long as you work on it with a mind to the process and not just mindless pasting words into a word document.

Even on your open book exams, you will be well served if you only have to rarely (or never) look info up on your outline.




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