My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

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thomas7669
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My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby thomas7669 » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:55 pm

For example judging by poster on this forum and the exams of other professors at my school the standard torts exam is one giant fact pattern with one question that asks something like "Evaluate all possible claims and defenses using sound legal reasoning". Basically a giant issue spotter exam.

My torts professor however does things differently. He usually has 100 true false and multiple choice questions worth 50%. The other 50% is divided up between 3 smaller essays for three different smaller fact patterns(usually split 25/15/10). And these essays arent issue spotters. Usually you have to decide an appeal in a torts case. They seem to be based off real cases that we dont cover in class.

Since the issues are pretty much going to be given to us the exam is not going to be about issue spotting. My big worry is that everyone is going to know the law and apply a good analysis to the appeals resulting in a death curve(I guess since its closed book, maybe the curve wont be as harsh). How do you separate yourself from the pack on the essay portion of an exam like this?

And is there any good supplement/program for practicing multiple choice and true false questions?

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LeDique
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby LeDique » Wed Sep 12, 2012 6:04 pm

thomas7669 wrote:For example judging by poster on this forum and the exams of other professors at my school the standard torts exam is one giant fact pattern with one question that asks something like "Evaluate all possible claims and defenses using sound legal reasoning". Basically a giant issue spotter exam.

My torts professor however does things differently. He usually has 100 true false and multiple choice questions worth 50%. The other 50% is divided up between 3 smaller essays for three different smaller fact patterns(usually split 25/15/10). And these essays arent issue spotters. Usually you have to decide an appeal in a torts case. They seem to be based off real cases that we dont cover in class.

Since the issues are pretty much going to be given to us the exam is not going to be about issue spotting. My big worry is that everyone is going to know the law and apply a good analysis to the appeals resulting in a death curve(I guess since its closed book, maybe the curve wont be as harsh). How do you separate yourself from the pack on the essay portion of an exam like this?

And is there any good supplement/program for practicing multiple choice and true false questions?


Why do you think deciding an appeal is different than an issue spotter?

thomas7669
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2012 12:46 am

Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby thomas7669 » Wed Sep 12, 2012 6:12 pm

Because the question list the issues you need to discuss(at least on my professor's exams) whereas on an issue spotter, you spot the issues themselves(often times there are a lot of issues). Instead of it being spot the issue and then analysis, it is pure analysis.

Also this test is different since half the time will be devoted to the multiple choice/true false questions only leaving about an hour and a half for the 3 essays with three different fact patterns.

Basically on an issue spotter you can stand out by spotting more issues than your classmates. On this exam you cant do that because the issues are listed in the question.

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Mick Haller
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby Mick Haller » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:00 pm

Emanuels often have T/F and MC questions. Also, find some bar prep materials, and practice MBE questions for your subject

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LeDique
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby LeDique » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:41 pm

thomas7669 wrote:Basically on an issue spotter you can stand out by spotting more issues than your classmates. On this exam you cant do that because the issues are listed in the question.


No, you can't. You can stand out by spotting more issues and writing better analysis. Just spotting the issues isn't a good law school exam. Also, the issues listed aren't all of the issues within that area.

thomas7669
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby thomas7669 » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:52 pm

LeDique wrote:
thomas7669 wrote:Basically on an issue spotter you can stand out by spotting more issues than your classmates. On this exam you cant do that because the issues are listed in the question.


No, you can't. You can stand out by spotting more issues and writing better analysis. Just spotting the issues isn't a good law school exam. Also, the issues listed aren't all of the issues within that area.


The exam says to only focus on those issues. He doesnt want us going off topic. And your first point didnt contradict my point. Most people do well on the analysis for the issues they spot, otherwise they probably wouldnt have spotted the issue in the first place. When you take spotting issues away I feel like it is going to result in very similar essays for the entire class.

ninereal
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby ninereal » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:08 pm

thomas7669 wrote:
LeDique wrote:
thomas7669 wrote:Basically on an issue spotter you can stand out by spotting more issues than your classmates. On this exam you cant do that because the issues are listed in the question.


No, you can't. You can stand out by spotting more issues and writing better analysis. Just spotting the issues isn't a good law school exam. Also, the issues listed aren't all of the issues within that area.


The exam says to only focus on those issues. He doesnt want us going off topic. And your first point didnt contradict my point. Most people do well on the analysis for the issues they spot, otherwise they probably wouldnt have spotted the issue in the first place. When you take spotting issues away I feel like it is going to result in very similar essays for the entire class.


I'm sure you would know that better than the guy who writes and grades them.

ClubberLang
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby ClubberLang » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:50 am

thomas7669 wrote:Because the question list the issues you need to discuss(at least on my professor's exams) whereas on an issue spotter, you spot the issues themselves(often times there are a lot of issues). Instead of it being spot the issue and then analysis, it is pure analysis.

Also this test is different since half the time will be devoted to the multiple choice/true false questions only leaving about an hour and a half for the 3 essays with three different fact patterns.

Basically on an issue spotter you can stand out by spotting more issues than your classmates. On this exam you cant do that because the issues are listed in the question.


The issues are usually obvious. Almost all the points are in the analysis. This exam does not seem atypical. Identifying more issues than your classmates does not make you stand out on exams. You will learn this after you take one (for your sake hopefully before).

Seffer15
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Re: My professors dont give the typical law school exams.

Postby Seffer15 » Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:50 am

Mick Haller wrote:Emanuels often have T/F and MC questions. Also, find some bar prep materials, and practice MBE questions for your subject


Do this.

Most professors have MC/short answer questions because it pretty much makes the curve for them. Once they get to the essay portion, the class has already been at least somewhat distributed. For the most part, if you do well on the multiple choice and don't screw up on the essays, you'll be near the top of the curve.

I had two professors that did this last year. Ask for suggestions of practice questions and do some google searches of your own. Your library staff might be able to help you find some sites with practice MC questions. It also helps to have a very detailed outline since the MC questions will be focused on a very specific parts of the course.




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