Quick citation question

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LawStudent323
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Quick citation question

Postby LawStudent323 » Sun Aug 05, 2012 7:23 pm

Finishing up a summer job assignment, and I need to cite a case with a court name in it. Particularly, Asahi of personal jurisdiction fame.

The full name is: Asahi Metal Industry Company, Ltd. v. Superior Court of California, Solano County

I know you shorten the first party to: Asahi Metal Indus. Co.

What the heck do I do with the second part? I can't find a rule on point. Part of me thinks I would just abbreviate appropriate words (Super. Ct. of CA, Solano Cnty.), but a quick Google search has most sources shortening it just to "Superior Court".

Is there a rule on point for citing cases with court names as parties in Bluebook? Can someone point me in the right direction? Thanks!

zomginternets
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby zomginternets » Sun Aug 05, 2012 8:54 pm

At least in CA state courts, "Superior Court of the State of California" is always shortened to "Superior Court". I would do that even if you're in fed. court or in another state, unless there you find a bluebook rule on point (which I don't think there is).

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ilovesf
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby ilovesf » Sun Aug 05, 2012 8:58 pm

LawStudent323 wrote:Finishing up a summer job assignment, and I need to cite a case with a court name in it. Particularly, Asahi of personal jurisdiction fame.

The full name is: Asahi Metal Industry Company, Ltd. v. Superior Court of California, Solano County

I know you shorten the first party to: Asahi Metal Indus. Co.

What the heck do I do with the second part? I can't find a rule on point. Part of me thinks I would just abbreviate appropriate words (Super. Ct. of CA, Solano Cnty.), but a quick Google search has most sources shortening it just to "Superior Court".

Is there a rule on point for citing cases with court names as parties in Bluebook? Can someone point me in the right direction? Thanks!

There is. I do not have my blue book in front of me but it is near the end with the other abbreviations - there is a special section about court names. I believe it's something like Super. Ct. And County is shortened to Cnty. I can't remember what you do with California, but it's there in the blue book.
edit: lol i did a bad job of reading your actual post. i wouldn't trust google search because people often end up citing it incorrectly and not everyone follows bb. if you are supposed to strictly follow bb, you definitely don't leave it as "superior court"
Last edited by ilovesf on Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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jmhendri
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby jmhendri » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:03 pm

zomginternets wrote:At least in CA state courts, "Superior Court of the State of California" is always shortened to "Superior Court". I would do that even if you're in fed. court or in another state, unless there you find a bluebook rule on point (which I don't think there is).


Fairly certain it depends on the court for which you're citing it.

zbv4
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby zbv4 » Thu Aug 09, 2012 1:28 pm

Easy solution. Plug "Asahi" into a westlaw journal search. Find a couple instances where the case has been cited in leading law reviews and just do what they did.

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Bronte
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby Bronte » Wed Aug 15, 2012 5:47 pm

This is probably old news now and also incredibly douchey, but for posterity and because I feel like it the correct citation of Asahi is: Asahi Metal Indus. Co. v. Superior Court, 480 U.S. 102 (1987).

In rule 10.2.1(a), The Bluebook says:

Omit all prepositional phrases of location not following “City,” or like expressions, unless the omission would leave only one word in the name of a party or the location is part of the full name of a business or similar entity:

Surrick v. Board of Wardens

Not: Surrick v. Board of Wardens of the Port of Philadelphia


Thus, you drop "of California, Salano County."

You don't abbreviate "Superior Court" to "Super. Ct." When you're abbreviating the titles of case names, you use Table T6 and T10. BB 10.2.2. The abbreviation "Super. Ct." is found in Table T7 and is only meant to be used in the date parenthetical, not the case name. BB 10.4.

As a reference, check Matthew R. Huppert, Commercial Purpose As Constitutional Purpose: Reevaluating Asahi Through the Lens of International Patent Litigation, 111 Colum. L. Rev. 624, 669 n.44 (2011). Although Berkeley definitely botched it in Jennifer A. Schwartz, Piercing the Corporate Veil of an Alien Parent for Jurisdictional Purposes: A Proposal for A Standard That Comports with Due Process, 96 Cal. L. Rev. 731, 763 n.40 (2008).

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jmhendri
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Re: Quick citation question

Postby jmhendri » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:25 pm

Bronte wrote:This is probably old news now and also incredibly douchey, but for posterity and because I feel like it the correct citation of Asahi is: Asahi Metal Indus. Co. v. Superior Court, 480 U.S. 102 (1987).

In rule 10.2.1(a), The Bluebook says:

Omit all prepositional phrases of location not following “City,” or like expressions, unless the omission would leave only one word in the name of a party or the location is part of the full name of a business or similar entity:

Surrick v. Board of Wardens

Not: Surrick v. Board of Wardens of the Port of Philadelphia




Unless my bluebook is outdated, I think that's rule 10.2.1(f).

/incredibly douchiness




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