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Myself
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Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:36 pm

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Postby Myself » Wed Jul 25, 2012 2:30 am

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Myself
Posts: 1372
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:36 pm

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Postby Myself » Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:51 am

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Sauer Grapes
Posts: 1222
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 11:02 am

Re: Recriprocity

Postby Sauer Grapes » Sat Jul 28, 2012 9:31 pm

--LinkRemoved--

BeautifulSW
Posts: 581
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:52 am

Re: Recriprocity

Postby BeautifulSW » Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:10 pm

It comes in two flavors. "Reciprocity" means "you take our lawyers and we will take yours." "Admission on waiver" means "We'll take anyone who applies." Usually both have an exam and experience requirement. Colorado is a reciprocity state while Texas is a waiver state.

Besides Texas, the only waiver jurisdiction I'm aware of is D.C.

"Exam" means that you passed the bar exam in your home jurisdiction.

Jtjohnso24
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012 3:39 pm

Re: Recriprocity

Postby Jtjohnso24 » Fri Dec 28, 2012 4:39 pm

"Reciprocity" can mean a lot of things. Bar exam reciprocity typically refers to transferring a MBE or UBE score to another jurisdiction. Bar reciprocity refers to Admission on Motion. That's when you can waive into another jurisdiction based on practicing law for a defined period of time. Check out http://www.BarReciprocity.com. That website lays out the varying types of reciprocity and other waiver rules for each jurisdiction.

There are many states that offer reciprocity admission and transfer of test scores beyond just Texas and DC.

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: Recriprocity

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:10 pm

I think the one thing that sets DC apart is that if you're admitted elsewhere, you can waive in immediately if you meet score minimums, whereas most other jurisdictions require you to practice for some period first (usually 5 years). (Apparently Minnesota and North Dakota do this as well, but somehow they don't come up very much!) That's why DC always comes up in these discussions, even though there are lots and lots of other states that also allow reciprocity.




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