What is the most famous 1L case?

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What is the most famous 1L case?

Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad
83
31%
Hawkins v. McGee (Hairy Hand)
22
8%
Pennoyer v. Neff
39
15%
Marbury v. Madison (for those that are forced to take Con law)
51
19%
Pierson v. Post
21
8%
Erie Railroad v. Tompkins
39
15%
Regina v. Dudley and Stephens
10
4%
 
Total votes: 265

LawMan20
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby LawMan20 » Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:11 pm

Are you guys suggesting that your lol schools are better than mine because mine hasn't been teaching 'famous' cases?

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ph14
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby ph14 » Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:14 pm

1) Palsgraf
2) Pennoyer
3) Erie

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romothesavior
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby romothesavior » Wed Feb 22, 2012 7:51 pm

LawMan20 wrote:Are you guys suggesting that your lol schools are better than mine because mine hasn't been teaching 'famous' cases?

It is nearly impossible to have an understanding of Torts (specifically proximate cause) without reading Palsgraf. It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie. Pennoyer is no longer really applicable, but it is a pretty helpful building block to understanding personal jurisdiction, and I'd guess that nearly every Civil Procedure class in the country starts out with it in PJX. Pierson v. Post is a classic that I'd imagine 95%+ of law students learn, and Hawkins and Dudley are both relatively well-known and are almost always read in first-year classes.

I can maybe understand not reading Pierson, Dudley, and Hawkins, but to have never heard of Palsgraf, Erie, or Pennoyer means you you don't pay much attention, your law school is not in the United States, or you are full of crap about not reading any of these cases.

LawMan20
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby LawMan20 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:01 pm

romothesavior wrote:
LawMan20 wrote:Are you guys suggesting that your lol schools are better than mine because mine hasn't been teaching 'famous' cases?

It is nearly impossible to have an understanding of Torts (specifically proximate cause) without reading Palsgraf. It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie. Pennoyer is no longer really applicable, but it is a pretty helpful building block to understanding personal jurisdiction, and I'd guess that nearly every Civil Procedure class in the country starts out with it in PJX. Pierson v. Post is a classic that I'd imagine 95%+ of law students learn, and Hawkins and Dudley are both relatively well-known and are almost always read in first-year classes.

I can maybe understand not reading Pierson, Dudley, and Hawkins, but to have never heard of Palsgraf, Erie, or Pennoyer means you you don't pay much attention, your law school is not in the United States, or you are full of crap about not reading any of these cases.


Not sure what to tell you, and I don't want to potentially out myself by saying what classes I took last semester and what I'm taking this semester. But, at this point in my 1L year, the only case I've read/heard of from that list is Marbury v. Madison.

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red_owl
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby red_owl » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:14 pm

Marbury

bdubs
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby bdubs » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:22 pm

romothesavior wrote:
LawMan20 wrote:Are you guys suggesting that your lol schools are better than mine because mine hasn't been teaching 'famous' cases?

It is nearly impossible to have an understanding of Torts (specifically proximate cause) without reading Palsgraf.


That is just wrong. Palsgraf is a concept development case, but the most of the law discussed in it is totally inapplicable to modern tort law (remember that in the end it's a directness test decision). I could see a professor who has no interest in the history of tort law skipping Palsgraf and replacing it with one of the more modern discussions of the proximate cause standard.

I'd say it's a toss up between Dudley and Hawkins, only because they have memorable facts.

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beachbum
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby beachbum » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:27 pm

romothesavior wrote:It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie.


In fairness, some civpro classes just don't cover Eerie. My civpro prof had this existential crisis about whether to cover the case (which apparently involved a listserv of civpro profs who were facing a similar dilemma), and finally decided to cover it, but only spend one class on it. On the other hand, I've heard horror stories from other civpro classes that spend a considerable chunk of the semester on Eerie and its progeny.

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Antilles Haven
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby Antilles Haven » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:30 pm

beachbum wrote:
romothesavior wrote:It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie.


In fairness, some civpro classes just don't cover Eerie. My civpro prof had this existential crisis about whether to cover the case (which apparently involved a listserv of civpro profs who were facing a similar dilemma), and finally decided to cover it, but only spend one class on it. On the other hand, I've heard horror stories from other civpro classes that spend a considerable chunk of the semester on Eerie and its progeny.

Erie --> :|

Hannah/Byrd --> :x

Gasperini --> :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:

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romothesavior
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby romothesavior » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:32 pm

beachbum wrote:
romothesavior wrote:It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie.


In fairness, some civpro classes just don't cover Eerie. My civpro prof had this existential crisis about whether to cover the case (which apparently involved a listserv of civpro profs who were facing a similar dilemma), and finally decided to cover it, but only spend one class on it. On the other hand, I've heard horror stories from other civpro classes that spend a considerable chunk of the semester on Eerie and its progeny.

Yeah I know it isn't covered in all classes. But of the trifecta I listed (Palsgraf, Erie, Pennoyer), it would be pretty hard to avoid all three in LS.

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beach_terror
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby beach_terror » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:33 pm

Pennoyer because nobody forgets that shit exists if you're forced to read it. It's also still good law in part, so it's not like it stands for nothing.

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AreJay711
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby AreJay711 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:33 pm

If I was a hiring partner I would no offer the fuck out of someone for not knowing Pierson v. Post with its chasing foxes and the mocking dissent. If some young buck managed to drop "Well maybe if I had just had X of imperial stature..." he would have a job in a second. It is also still good law and came up in that migratory bird case.

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Tanicius
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby Tanicius » Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:01 pm

AreJay711 wrote:If I was a hiring partner I would no offer the fuck out of someone for not knowing Pierson v. Post with its chasing foxes and the mocking dissent. If some young buck managed to drop "Well maybe if I had just had X of imperial stature..." he would have a job in a second. It is also still good law and came up in that migratory bird case.


It really depends on how much class time was given to the case though. Pierson v. Post is understandable in, like, a five minute discussion. I just remember it as one of many equally absurd cases in a slew that show there are ridiculous policy reasons underlying lots of property law. "Oh, that's the one case where they tried to encourage killing foxes, right."

LawMan20
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby LawMan20 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:37 pm

AreJay711 wrote:If I was a hiring partner I would no offer the fuck out of someone for not knowing Pierson v. Post with its chasing foxes and the mocking dissent. If some young buck managed to drop "Well maybe if I had just had X of imperial stature..." he would have a job in a second. It is also still good law and came up in that migratory bird case.


I have a couple interviews next week, so I guess I'll have to read/brief all of these over the weekend :(

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Guchster
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby Guchster » Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:39 pm

Antilles Haven wrote:
beachbum wrote:
romothesavior wrote:It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie.


In fairness, some civpro classes just don't cover Eerie. My civpro prof had this existential crisis about whether to cover the case (which apparently involved a listserv of civpro profs who were facing a similar dilemma), and finally decided to cover it, but only spend one class on it. On the other hand, I've heard horror stories from other civpro classes that spend a considerable chunk of the semester on Eerie and its progeny.

Erie --> :|

Hannah/Byrd --> :x

Gasperini --> :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:


fuck ginsberg for gasperini

ceereeus420
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby ceereeus420 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 11:55 pm

Leonard v. Pepsi Co.
Twombly/Iqbal

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TTH
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby TTH » Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:04 am

Maybe not the most famous, but certainly the most badass is Pennzoil v. Texaco.

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Ikki
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby Ikki » Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:14 am

I don't think a single case has made me crack up inside a library as loud as UNITED NOVELTY CO., Inc. v. DANIELS et al..

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superhands
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby superhands » Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:38 am

Ikki wrote:I don't think a single case has made me crack up inside a library as loud as UNITED NOVELTY CO., Inc. v. DANIELS et al..


This case is pretty absurd. Almost as absurd as Palsgraf 2.0.

shoeshine
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby shoeshine » Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:51 am

So Palsgraf is the clear winner then.

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AreJay711
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby AreJay711 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:03 am

Tanicius wrote:
AreJay711 wrote:If I was a hiring partner I would no offer the fuck out of someone for not knowing Pierson v. Post with its chasing foxes and the mocking dissent. If some young buck managed to drop "Well maybe if I had just had X of imperial stature..." he would have a job in a second. It is also still good law and came up in that migratory bird case.


It really depends on how much class time was given to the case though. Pierson v. Post is understandable in, like, a five minute discussion. I just remember it as one of many equally absurd cases in a slew that show there are ridiculous policy reasons underlying lots of property law. "Oh, that's the one case where they tried to encourage killing foxes, right."


Maybe. I think all property cases of creating ownership rights are about maximizing the take / production / furnishing of the market though.

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bceagles182
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby bceagles182 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:41 am

quiver wrote:If you interpret the question as "what is the most famous case for 1Ls" I think it comes down to Erie and Palsgraf. We had endless discussion on both and I heard about both of them during 1L long before actually getting to them. I voted Erie; I think it's the only case in any of my outlines that has an entire section on it (although Chevron is close in Admin).

If you interpret the question as "what is the case read in 1L but most famous universally" I think it's obviously Marbury.


TCR.

If you asked most lawyers, "what case do you associate most with 1L?" I imagine most would say Erie, Palsgraf, or Pennoyer.

But if you gave the American public a list of all cases that are generally read during 1L and asked which one is the most well known, the most common answer would undoubtedly be a Con Law case -- probably either Marbury v. Madison, Brown v. Board, or Roe v. Wade (if you included the latter two).

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johansantana21
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby johansantana21 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:56 am

romothesavior wrote:
LawMan20 wrote:Are you guys suggesting that your lol schools are better than mine because mine hasn't been teaching 'famous' cases?

It is nearly impossible to have an understanding of Torts (specifically proximate cause) without reading Palsgraf. It is impossible to understand choice of law in federal courts without reading Erie. Pennoyer is no longer really applicable, but it is a pretty helpful building block to understanding personal jurisdiction, and I'd guess that nearly every Civil Procedure class in the country starts out with it in PJX. Pierson v. Post is a classic that I'd imagine 95%+ of law students learn, and Hawkins and Dudley are both relatively well-known and are almost always read in first-year classes.

I can maybe understand not reading Pierson, Dudley, and Hawkins, but to have never heard of Palsgraf, Erie, or Pennoyer means you you don't pay much attention, your law school is not in the United States, or you are full of crap about not reading any of these cases.


I got above median in Torts and I don't even remember what Palsgraf is.

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PDaddy
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby PDaddy » Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:40 am

Con Law: You might want to list I would also look at Dred Scott v. Sanford. Agreed strongly with listing of Madison v. Marbury.

Civ Pro: I would add Dennis Prince et al. v. The Pittston Company, also known as the case that arose out of The Buffalo Creek Disaster.

Others include both Brown v. Board cases, which you cannot study effectively without studying Plessy v. Ferguson, the Grad School Cases (such as Murray v. Maryland, 1936), et. al.

Plessy isn't highlighted as much, but no one can fully understand the Brown cases without studying it, as well as Charles Hamilton Houston's methodical efforts at chipping away at the doctrine of "separate but equal" via grad school cases.

Plessy was the left jab that set up the knockout punch that was Brown.
.
Last edited by PDaddy on Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:15 am, edited 3 times in total.

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L’Étranger
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby L’Étranger » Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:56 am

US v. X-Citement Video
Keeton v. Hustler Magazine, Inc.

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TTH
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Re: What is the most famous 1L case?

Postby TTH » Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:44 am

L’Étranger wrote:US v. X-Citement Video
Keeton v. Hustler Magazine, Inc.


Don't care about your poast that much, but strong tar.




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