Better grade on memo or brief?

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RR320
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:07 pm

Better grade on memo or brief?

Postby RR320 » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:27 am

I actually did well on my memo last semester and I ended up with the highest grade in the class. I am starting to worry about this semester and my brief. Do legal writing grades usually stay consistent or have people seen big differences in their grade?

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DrGuano
Posts: 192
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 1:13 pm

Re: Better grade on memo or brief?

Postby DrGuano » Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:20 am

RR320 wrote:I actually did well on my memo last semester and I ended up with the highest grade in the class. I am starting to worry about this semester and my brief. Do legal writing grades usually stay consistent or have people seen big differences in their grade?


of course it varies from person to person. personally, i kept getting better - b+ (short) a- (long), a (brief), but i know another person who went the opposite (a-, b, b-).

just sack up and work on it.

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ben4847
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Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 11:38 pm

Re: Better grade on memo or brief?

Postby ben4847 » Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:27 am

I worked up from well below median on the first one, to median on the memo, and to second best in class on the brief. I think that means I'm a bad lawyer.

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Always Credited
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Re: Better grade on memo or brief?

Postby Always Credited » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:05 pm

LRW grades, unlike the substantive classes, usually closely track how much effort you put into it. Look at the grading ruberic - its 90% bullshit. Format. Citations. Research used. Punctuation.

All that crap heavily outweighs "makes good legal argument", or "would possibly actually convince a judge". Just spend a lot of time perfecting the minutia, and get an A.

Edit: To answer your question, they usually change around a little. Oral argument factors into this and so does people's recognition of the above.




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