weird multiple choice scoring

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shock259
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weird multiple choice scoring

Postby shock259 » Fri Dec 09, 2011 11:06 pm

I have two finals that are part multiple choice and part essay. Each professor has said that if we think a MC question is vague or unclear and there could be multiple correct answers, we can write in an explanation for what we think think the ambiguity is and pick an answer. If our explanation shows that we understood the issue but the question wasn't clear, we will be given points even if we picked the wrong answer, up to full credit for the problem. However, if our explanation reveals that we didn't understand the issue, but we picked the right answer, the question will be marked wrong.

From what I can tell, it's a weird system that wants to allow people to write in for a confusing question, but puts big disincentives for doing so if you are wrong. Any thoughts?

I'm thinking time lost explaining question + possibility of being docked points even if I get it right does not justify the possibility of recovering points if I get it wrong.

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Gamecubesupreme
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby Gamecubesupreme » Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:33 am

Wow, I used to believe that this would have been the perfect system for MC, as it takes away the whole "You either get it right or wrong, no middle ground" part of MC that everyone hates.

But then I realize this system is too idealistic to ever work properly.

Not sure what made your prof brave enough to try this out, but I really don't think it will work as well as he thought it would.

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Extension_Cord
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby Extension_Cord » Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:04 am

Easy solution, answer every question wrong and explain the BLL. If you know the BLL and can cite cases, you will get no more than 25% wrong, and if you a good negative guesser I think you can get it down to 10% or less.

Trolling the professor.

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king3780
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby king3780 » Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:56 am

shock259 wrote:I have two finals that are part multiple choice and part essay. Each professor has said that if we think a MC question is vague or unclear and there could be multiple correct answers, we can write in an explanation for what we think think the ambiguity is and pick an answer. If our explanation shows that we understood the issue but the question wasn't clear, we will be given points even if we picked the wrong answer, up to full credit for the problem. However, if our explanation reveals that we didn't understand the issue, but we picked the right answer, the question will be marked wrong.

From what I can tell, it's a weird system that wants to allow people to write in for a confusing question, but puts big disincentives for doing so if you are wrong. Any thoughts?

I'm thinking time lost explaining question + possibility of being docked points even if I get it right does not justify the possibility of recovering points if I get it wrong.


I have had a couple exams with the bolded, but they were both if you pick the right answer, it doesn't matter if what you wrote was wrong. In other words, the explanation can only help, but never hurt.

shock259
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:30 am

Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby shock259 » Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:40 pm

That makes more sense, I think. Subtracting points seems so odd. The prof has just said to make sure we are certain about writing in a response before we do. Not sure if this is because he wants us to do better or if he just doesn't want to read a bunch of responses that he doesn't have to.

BlueDiamond
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby BlueDiamond » Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:46 pm

if the prof is going to dock points for bad explanations of correct answers and only give some points for poor explanations of what he deems the wrong answer why not just get rid of MC and make another full hypothetical? thats basically doing the same thing

random5483
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby random5483 » Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:54 pm

BlueDiamond wrote:if the prof is going to dock points for bad explanations of correct answers and only give some points for poor explanations of what he deems the wrong answer why not just get rid of MC and make another full hypothetical? thats basically doing the same thing



I had one exam where the prof allowed explanations. If an ambiguity (reasonable) exists and the student answers the question based on a reasonable premise, then the professor graded the multiple choice question as if the premise was true. Basically, if your final answer is right according to the professor's interpretation of the question, but wrong based on your premise, you got no points for the question. This was placed to prevent people from finding excessive ambiguities.

The system makes sense to me. Once you spot an ambiguity and state a premise based on which you are answering that ambiguity, the professor should grade you based on the premise.

sidhesadie
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Re: weird multiple choice scoring

Postby sidhesadie » Mon Dec 12, 2011 7:52 pm

I have one coming up that has T/F questions, prof says if you believe the question is ambiguous, you should select your T/F answer, then write what you think the ambiguity is. HOWEVER, you LOSE points if the *professor* doesn't think that question is ambiguous. But, there's 30 points for 19 questions, so he's obviously got some wiggle room in there for *something* he thinks could be ambiguous. But if you pick wrong, he docks you points, even if the T/F answer was correct.




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