When to use supplement questions

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gdane
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When to use supplement questions

Postby gdane » Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:59 pm

I'm outlining the respective sections I've already finished for torts and civ pro this weekend. After I'm done with these section outlines, I'd like to practice application of the concepts in my outlines. I have e and e's and siegels q&a's. Would it be ok to use them now or should I wait until later in the semester? If I should wait, what else can I do after finishing my section outlines?

Thanks everyone!

NotMyRealName09
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby NotMyRealName09 » Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:52 pm

You don't know enough yet. Don't practice until you see the forest from the trees. Get ahead on your reading instead.

Also, is this a real question?
Last edited by NotMyRealName09 on Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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MrPapagiorgio
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby MrPapagiorgio » Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:54 pm

NotMyRealName09 wrote:You don't know enough yet. Don't practice until you see the forest from the trees. Get ahead on your reading instead.

Its only been a week and I'm already sick of that expression.

random5483
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby random5483 » Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:57 pm

I did not use supplements unless I felt the professor and the book failed to convey the black letter law effectively. A few of my classmates relied on supplements and were docked because they stated rules that were different from the ones covered in class. Use supplements in the classes where the professor hides the law and talks around it. Supplements have a purpose and are helpful in those cases.

Supplements can also help if you feel you have holes in your notes or outlines, or just as a means of reassuring yourself. You should not, however, rely on them over the substantive information covered in class. Also, minimize the supplements you use. Every additional supplement/hornbook/etc is something new to read. The more stuff you have to read, the less time you have to study.

I know my answer has gone well beyond the call of the question, and if you find this not useful (or annoying), I apologize. I just want to warn you that over-reliance on supplements can hurt your grades. You seem like a very motivated/energetic law student since you have already started outlining. Don't start using supplements till around the mid-point in the semester. The only exception is if you are completely confused by what the professor says, in which case, a supplement like the E&E might be useful.

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beach_terror
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby beach_terror » Thu Aug 25, 2011 11:07 pm

Browse the corresponding E&E sections but I'd save the examples for exam prep time.

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Naked Dude
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby Naked Dude » Thu Aug 25, 2011 11:31 pm

Yeah, I've been reading the relevant E&E section when confused. I've done some examples but I might save them. Also, I'm not worried about being docked for using a supplement I know the professor recommended, or one written by the casebook author-but maybe that's not what's meant here

traydeuce
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby traydeuce » Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:06 am

Look, even E&E's are dangerous because in the explanations, they'll start telling you stuff that is contrary to what you learned. You know what works really, really well for practice questions, when you're practicing to take an EXAM? OLD EXAMS. Ideally ones written by your very own professor! Ideally ones where your professor has written a post-exam memo or designated a best exam for future students to read. But if not those, try another professor's exams. They're still closer to what an EXAM looks like than some questions in a supplement. This really isn't rocket science.

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gdane
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby gdane » Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:17 am

I will use exams. However, I'll use those in a few months when I have my outlines complete and memorized. For now I just want to really really grasp the concepts in small chunks. It seems like people are telling me to wait to use the supplement questions though.Noted. Thanks.

traydeuce
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby traydeuce » Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:41 am

gdane wrote:I will use exams. However, I'll use those in a few months when I have my outlines complete and memorized. For now I just want to really really grasp the concepts in small chunks. It seems like people are telling me to wait to use the supplement questions though.Noted. Thanks.


You make a good point about waiting on old exams. I aced everything my first 1L semester. But when I first picked up an exam, maybe in early October, I was pretty scared because I didn't know half of the stuff on it. And even the stuff I did know, I didn't remember too well because I hadn't reviewed it. So that's an unnecessarily worrying and pointless exercise you don't want to do. There is something to the small chunk thing, but you can break an exam question down by issue - a civ pro exam question, for example, will ramble on across personal jurisdiction, subject matter in its various forms, Erie, etc., but once you're through most of the semester, you can identify what's personal, what's subject matter, and practice the discrete parts that are personal, and are subject matter. That said, Civ Pro is perhaps the place where practice questions in supplements make the most sense, because the types of Civ Pro questions that can even be asked just aren't that many in number. A good supplement (Glannon) won't vary much from whatever exam you get - unless you have an oddball Civ Pro professor, and they do exist.

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Naked Dude
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Re: When to use supplement questions

Postby Naked Dude » Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:30 pm

traydeuce wrote:Look, even E&E's are dangerous because in the explanations, they'll start telling you stuff that is contrary to what you learned. You know what works really, really well for practice questions, when you're practicing to take an EXAM? OLD EXAMS. Ideally ones written by your very own professor! Ideally ones where your professor has written a post-exam memo or designated a best exam for future students to read. But if not those, try another professor's exams. They're still closer to what an EXAM looks like than some questions in a supplement. This really isn't rocket science.


Right but what if your Civ Pro professor specifically recommends the E&E or a particular hornbook? The only supplements I've purchased are ones: that the professor specifically recommended, one written by the professor, or one written by the casebook author (i.e. Dressler for criminal law). I'm worried that I don't fully grasp, say, battery (I mean, it's pretty straightforward, but I feel compelled to work through examples in the E&E to help me cement it). If you think it's too early to be worrying about that, though, it makes sense. Right now it's difficult because we're looking at trees, and I'm scared because I want to know what part of the forest we're in.

For now I guess I should just be satisfied with reading and understanding the cases and taking good notes in class, but it's really hard to gauge if I'm on the right track. Torts has been really hard because we're focusing only on battery. Some of the stuff that isn't battery I'm pretty sure (from extensive television watching) is negligence or assault, but the professor won't let us talk about it yet. I understand breaking things into chunks, but when things don't EXIST in discrete spheres, I don't find it useful to treat them that way. Intentional torts and a lot of other areas of the law seem to bleed into each other, so treating them as completely separate units has confused me because I need better context. When subjects/topics are artificially taught as discrete entities, I begin to think of them as discrete entities and it slows my ability to make connections. Maybe that's not how everyone else learns but it frustrates me.




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