Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

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JohannDeMann
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby JohannDeMann » Sat Apr 18, 2015 12:33 am

It's only halftime bro. Give it one more good effort and see where you land. The editor in chief of our law review would have missed law review after one semester.

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Kratos
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Kratos » Sat Apr 18, 2015 12:43 pm

ManoftheHour wrote:
thatguy12 wrote:So all you guinea pigs from last year that bookmarked this thread...


Results? I hope celebrations are in order, for I also wish to partake in the (quasi)Lazy method.

edit: nvm, it is 5am and I haven't slept and I just realized I read over 2 years of responses. SUMMER BEFORE LAW SCHOOL :)

Didn't work. Only ended up top 25%.

Solid guide though.

Caveat: I was too lazy to do everything on the list, like read (although I used lots of supplements). I don't think that affected me as much as my burnout on over prepping for my first exam and leading to my under prepping on the remaining ones.

top 25% is pretty good

Lazy
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Lazy » Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:02 pm

I agree with both Kratos and Johann.

Beyond that, though, I have to say - I was not top 15% by the end of first semester. I was solidly around 25%, like you are. That first exam period was a hell of a learning opportunity, though. There's no substitute for learning what the exam period feels like, the type of stress you'll feel, and how to pace yourself through it. You can use that moving on when you prep for the next round.

Good luck with your spring exams!

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chuckbass
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby chuckbass » Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:15 pm

Lazy wrote:I agree with both Kratos and Johann.

Beyond that, though, I have to say - I was not top 15% by the end of first semester. I was solidly around 25%, like you are. That first exam period was a hell of a learning opportunity, though. There's no substitute for learning what the exam period feels like, the type of stress you'll feel, and how to pace yourself through it. You can use that moving on when you prep for the next round.

Good luck with your spring exams!

Yeah I think that stress is a huge factor. I generally handle stress well, especially in an exam taking type of situation, and in my first exam I just froze up at the beginning and literally stared at the problem for 30 minutes (of a three hour exam). Ultimately didn't do awful on the exam but it definitely hurt me, and it's something that hasn't been a problem after the first one and I'm not gonna let that happen with round two.

One thing I would advise 0Ls is to use ear plugs during the exam. WUSTL passes them out like candy before each exam and at first I just laughed it off and was like this is dumb, but it can be really intimidating in an exam when everyone is clacking away on their keyboard and it can really help you ignore everyone around you and just focus on yourself and the exam.

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BmoreOrLess
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby BmoreOrLess » Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:25 pm

scottidsntknow wrote:
Lazy wrote:I agree with both Kratos and Johann.

Beyond that, though, I have to say - I was not top 15% by the end of first semester. I was solidly around 25%, like you are. That first exam period was a hell of a learning opportunity, though. There's no substitute for learning what the exam period feels like, the type of stress you'll feel, and how to pace yourself through it. You can use that moving on when you prep for the next round.

Good luck with your spring exams!

Yeah I think that stress is a huge factor. I generally handle stress well, especially in an exam taking type of situation, and in my first exam I just froze up at the beginning and literally stared at the problem for 30 minutes (of a three hour exam). Ultimately didn't do awful on the exam but it definitely hurt me, and it's something that hasn't been a problem after the first one and I'm not gonna let that happen with round two.

One thing I would advise 0Ls is to use ear plugs during the exam. WUSTL passes them out like candy before each exam and at first I just laughed it off and was like this is dumb, but it can be really intimidating in an exam when everyone is clacking away on their keyboard and it can really help you ignore everyone around you and just focus on yourself and the exam.


I'd even recommend taking practice exams while wearing them so you get used to the dead silence (it was a little jarring for me at first)

I found it really useful to take practice exams in the reading room so I could get used to people frantically typing/flipping through pages around me.

itascot1992
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby itascot1992 » Wed May 13, 2015 9:54 am

any updates with grades?

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MurdockLLP
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby MurdockLLP » Wed May 13, 2015 10:09 am

tagging for 1L.

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TasmanianToucan
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby TasmanianToucan » Wed May 13, 2015 10:13 am

Tag

future!jd12
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby future!jd12 » Wed May 13, 2015 10:18 am

TasmanianToucan wrote:Tag

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fishbulb
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby fishbulb » Wed May 13, 2015 12:27 pm

tag

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Mack.Hambleton
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Mack.Hambleton » Sat May 30, 2015 2:12 am

fishbulb wrote:tag

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m27
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby m27 » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:47 pm

0L tagging!

Most of the information on this topic is consistent (except the debate over whether supplemental materials are necessary) but I still have a few questions:

1) When is the best time to begin writing an outline?

- Most guides suggest writing a course outline mid-way through the semester while others claim that reading the material over the summer to make a "sample outline" before classes is best. If the latter, would it be best to begin reading all the available material, including the casebook, hornbook, and relevant E&E?

2) When is the best time to begin taking a practice exam?

- It seems to be unanimously agreed upon that at least looking/reading a law school exam before classes start is beneficial; but should a 0L actually take one over the summer (assuming that he/she already did readings and a sample outline for the course)?
In sum would reading/outlining/looking at exams before classes begin be a complete waste of time or beneficial experience? Any additional info or suggestions would be appreciated

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Iwanttolawschool
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Iwanttolawschool » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:04 pm

m27 wrote:0L tagging!

Most of the information on this topic is consistent (except the debate over whether supplemental materials are necessary) but I still have a few questions:

1) When is the best time to begin writing an outline?

- Most guides suggest writing a course outline mid-way through the semester while others claim that reading the material over the summer to make a "sample outline" before classes is best. If the latter, would it be best to begin reading all the available material, including the casebook, hornbook, and relevant E&E?

2) When is the best time to begin taking a practice exam?

- It seems to be unanimously agreed upon that at least looking/reading a law school exam before classes start is beneficial; but should a 0L actually take one over the summer (assuming that he/she already did readings and a sample outline for the course)?
In sum would reading/outlining/looking at exams before classes begin be a complete waste of time or beneficial experience? Any additional info or suggestions would be appreciated


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKIpCPS-oZc

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twenty
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby twenty » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:17 pm

m27 wrote:2) When is the best time to begin taking a practice exam?

- It seems to be unanimously agreed upon that at least looking/reading a law school exam before classes start is beneficial; but should a 0L actually take one over the summer (assuming that he/she already did readings and a sample outline for the course)?
In sum would reading/outlining/looking at exams before classes begin be a complete waste of time or beneficial experience? Any additional info or suggestions would be appreciated


I'm a huge believer in practice exams, but don't look at/take one over the summer. Don't do any readings over the summer. Complete waste of time.

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chuckbass
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby chuckbass » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:42 pm

twenty wrote:
m27 wrote:2) When is the best time to begin taking a practice exam?

- It seems to be unanimously agreed upon that at least looking/reading a law school exam before classes start is beneficial; but should a 0L actually take one over the summer (assuming that he/she already did readings and a sample outline for the course)?
In sum would reading/outlining/looking at exams before classes begin be a complete waste of time or beneficial experience? Any additional info or suggestions would be appreciated


I'm a huge believer in practice exams, but don't look at/take one over the summer. Don't do any readings over the summer. Complete waste of time.

Also you shouldn't look at an exam before classes begin or even at the beginning. You also don't want to waste your professors exams before the end of the semester.

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m27
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby m27 » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:51 pm

scottidsntknow wrote:Also you shouldn't look at an exam before classes begin or even at the beginning. You also don't want to waste your professors exams before the end of the semester.


Very true. What about third-party exams from 7Sage?

twenty wrote:Don't do any readings over the summer. Complete waste of time.


Why do you think it would be a waste of time? Some advocate that doing readings gives them a feel for the course and the "big pictures."

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chuckbass
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby chuckbass » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:59 pm

I can't see how there would be any value in an exam that's not from your professor. I did a few practice tests in a couple of classes from other professors, but that was specifically because they were very similar to the practice tests from my own professor.

You shouldn't do any reading because you will get the big picture just fine during the semester.

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twenty
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby twenty » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:20 pm

I promise you that you will not get a "feel for the course" by summer-reading material out of your casebook that may or may not be relevant. You won't get a feel for the course for several weeks, perhaps even a month or two. Your goal is to figure out what your particular professor likes, not what all criminal law professors in the history of ever like. Some professors will give you tons of points for writing IRAC over and over, some professors want weird policy arguments, some professors teach absolutely no law and you end up just persuasively writing clever things that make sense (ended up getting an A+ in my one class like this), some professors will give out grades by word count, some professors throw their exams up in the air and the ones that land on the bottom get As.

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chuckbass
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby chuckbass » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:23 pm

twenty wrote:I promise you that you will not get a "feel for the course" by summer-reading material out of your casebook that may or may not be relevant. You won't get a feel for the course for several weeks, perhaps even a month or two. Your goal is to figure out what your particular professor likes, not what all criminal law professors in the history of ever like. Some professors will give you tons of points for writing IRAC over and over, some professors want weird policy arguments, some professors teach absolutely no law and you end up just persuasively writing clever things that make sense (ended up getting an A+ in my one class like this), some professors will give out grades by word count, some professors throw their exams up in the air and the ones that land on the bottom get As.

This exactly. If you try to prep otherwise I can only see it hurting you because then you start thinking that you understand things and start coming up with your own thoughts about things, when you should be focusing on the professor.

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ManoftheHour
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby ManoftheHour » Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:24 pm

scottidsntknow wrote:
twenty wrote:I promise you that you will not get a "feel for the course" by summer-reading material out of your casebook that may or may not be relevant. You won't get a feel for the course for several weeks, perhaps even a month or two. Your goal is to figure out what your particular professor likes, not what all criminal law professors in the history of ever like. Some professors will give you tons of points for writing IRAC over and over, some professors want weird policy arguments, some professors teach absolutely no law and you end up just persuasively writing clever things that make sense (ended up getting an A+ in my one class like this), some professors will give out grades by word count, some professors throw their exams up in the air and the ones that land on the bottom get As.

This exactly. If you try to prep otherwise I can only see it hurting you because then you start thinking that you understand things and start coming up with your own thoughts about things, when you should be focusing on the professor.

jphiggo
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby jphiggo » Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:41 pm

Just wanted to add a testimonial to Lazy's guide. I finished within the top 5% (also had one B, ha!) following Lazy's guide, while enjoying my nights and weekends. Thanks Lazy.

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DuckDynasty
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby DuckDynasty » Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:49 pm

Thanks OP!

Lazy
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Lazy » Fri Jun 19, 2015 9:03 am

m27 wrote:0L tagging!

Most of the information on this topic is consistent (except the debate over whether supplemental materials are necessary) but I still have a few questions:

1) When is the best time to begin writing an outline?

- Most guides suggest writing a course outline mid-way through the semester while others claim that reading the material over the summer to make a "sample outline" before classes is best. If the latter, would it be best to begin reading all the available material, including the casebook, hornbook, and relevant E&E?

2) When is the best time to begin taking a practice exam?

- It seems to be unanimously agreed upon that at least looking/reading a law school exam before classes start is beneficial; but should a 0L actually take one over the summer (assuming that he/she already did readings and a sample outline for the course)?
In sum would reading/outlining/looking at exams before classes begin be a complete waste of time or beneficial experience? Any additional info or suggestions would be appreciated


First, the answers you've gotten from the others have been good. I just figured I'd toss in my two cents.

1) With about 4 weeks left of the semester, at least in my personal opinion. Obviously, educated minds disagree on this topic, but I tried to keep my outlining to the last month or so. I think that making your own outline is only valuable for two reasons: 1) you are forced to review and distill your notes before the exam. Doing this later is, in my opinion, better because you want what you've reviewed to be fresh in your mind when you take the exam; and 2) it shows you how everything fits together and lets you organize your outline accordingly. You won't know how everything fits together early on in the semester, and definitely won't know how it fits together and should be organized before class even starts.

Also, as you saw in the aforementioned supplemental debate, I don't know why you'd read hornbooks and E&Es during the summer. I don't even think they're necessary during the actual school year.

2) Please don't do practice exams before the year starts. They'll be useless to you then, because no matter how many E&Es you've read, you won't actually know the law. It would be utterly pointless.

I generally don't believe summer prep of any kind is necessary. Read GTM if you really need to read something to feel like you'll be ready, but anything beyond that, like everyone else said, is kind of a waste. You won't understand a significant portion of it, you won't be able to tailor it to your professor, and you might even be learning it wrong. Then not only will you have to learn everything all over again once school starts, you'll have to unlearn the stuff you taught yourself incorrectly.

As I said in the guide, this is something some very intelligent people disagree with me on. They can give you a thorough guide to 0L prep if you're going to have some kind of spazz out if you don't do something to "get ready." I don't personally believe any 0L prep is necessary, though. Enjoy your last few months of freedom. After this, it's all excessive school-provided pizza, unending internship applications, and finals-based anxiety.

Lazy
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby Lazy » Fri Jun 19, 2015 9:04 am

jphiggo wrote:Just wanted to add a testimonial to Lazy's guide. I finished within the top 5% (also had one B, ha!) following Lazy's guide, while enjoying my nights and weekends. Thanks Lazy.


Glad to hear it! Congratulations on doing so well!

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tomjones
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Re: Lazy's Guide to Top 10% Without Working Nights or Weekends

Postby tomjones » Fri Jun 19, 2015 12:40 pm

jphiggo wrote:Just wanted to add a testimonial to Lazy's guide. I finished within the top 5% (also had one B, ha!) following Lazy's guide, while enjoying my nights and weekends. Thanks Lazy.


+1
Top 5% at a T1, also with one B. Enjoyed the hell out of the year. Just proves you don't have to kill yourself for 1L success. Thanks Lazy.




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