0L-3L advice you regret taking?

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Grizz
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Grizz » Thu May 26, 2011 12:20 am

dood wrote:everything i read on TLS about doing well in law school. things in the lounge are cool, i like some people on this site too. but remember: 97% of the u the advice u get on TLS is from a 0L or 1L.


I like you dood

DAJ_Summer
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby DAJ_Summer » Thu May 26, 2011 12:27 am

BruceWayne wrote:The biggest thing I would change would make is that I would have ignored the whole "not doing 0L prep". Looking back on it, it can only help you. Further, the students who were at the tip top of the class at my school overwhelmingly did 0L prep. The reality is that each semester in law school is very brief, and you don't have much time. Spending a lot of the semester learning black letter law puts you behind the ball. Knowing the black letter law isn't enough to even get you a D. You should be spending as much time as possible researching the professor's tendencies and preferences, researching the cutting edge arguments and policies in the law, and taking practice exams. This is how you make an exam shine. Simply applying law to fact and arguing both sides (which is, contrary to what many posters like to say, what almost everyone does--it's not some big secret) might be enough to get you a B or a B-. I also wish I had boosted up my typing speed. I had no idea how important this was. Frankly, if you type less than 50-60 WPM do not expect to receive grades higher than a B or B+ on traditional 1L exams. For the most part, quantity (as long as it's decent/on point) is the name of the game.

Oh and I truly believe that making outlines from scratch is a complete waste of time for most people, I did it first semester and it turned out horribly. I prefer using other people's outlines but focusing on class notes and reading notes. Just combine your class notes and reading notes and study from those. Use other people's outlines to check for anything that you've missed.


Funny, I guess different people can have different approaches, but I disagree with basically everything you wrote.

I did extremely well in law school, and of the people I spoke with who were in a similar position (it gets pretty easy to tell who it is, which is kind of sad, but that's a topic for another day) maybe one of ten did prep before law school started. That's an oddly specific stat, I'm well aware - but again, these things do come up (and again, that is sad).

I also can't imagine researching "cutting edge" arguments or policies, or even professor's positions, to be helpeful.

I am a very slow typist and my exams were all but certainly shorter than average, and I still did well. Again, amongst the set of people I know who had similar performance, typing speed or exam length didn't seem to be a factor at all.

And I made all of my outlines from scratch :lol:

keg411
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby keg411 » Thu May 26, 2011 8:49 am

I don't regret anything; but that's because I used a "hybrid" approach - I took the advice I liked, ignored the advice I didn't like and changed things that suited how I needed to study (for instance, I did a lot of "traditional" things like briefing cases even though a lot of advice ran contrary to that).

And to the two things in this topic - I did not do 0L prep (I worked) and I "sort of" made me own outlines (I didn't actually use old outlines, but I relied pretty heavily on them). Top 5% at T2 after first semester (and one second semester grade).

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BruceWayne
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby BruceWayne » Thu May 26, 2011 12:23 pm

DAJ_Summer wrote:Funny, I guess different people can have different approaches, but I disagree with basically everything you wrote.

I did extremely well in law school, and of the people I spoke with who were in a similar position (it gets pretty easy to tell who it is, which is kind of sad, but that's a topic for another day) maybe one of ten did prep before law school started. That's an oddly specific stat, I'm well aware - but again, these things do come up (and again, that is sad).

I also can't imagine researching "cutting edge" arguments or policies, or even professor's positions, to be helpeful.

I am a very slow typist and my exams were all but certainly shorter than average, and I still did well. Again, amongst the set of people I know who had similar performance, typing speed or exam length didn't seem to be a factor at all.

And I made all of my outlines from scratch :lol:


Different schools may warrant different approaches. A substantial amount of the people at the top of my school did heavy 0L prep. In fact 2 of the people in the running for the highest GPA in the entire class did it. So I'm definitely not going along with this TLS meme that it is a horrible idea and always bad--quite frankly it's not. In addition, those at the very top of the class at my school routinely write/turn in 25+ page exams. So I'm not going along with the TLS schick that length doesn't matter either. I'm not saying that it's impossible to succeed any other way, but I want people to make sure that they take a lot of the so called "definitely correct" TLS advice with a grain of salt. Frankly, a lot of it has more to do with bragging and wanting to come across as brilliant ("oh I didn't do any studying before I got to law school, I didn't do much work during 1L and had a great social life, and I didn't even type that much up on my exams but I still came out top 10 percent" etc. If you think about it, when you give that response to someone who is asking for advice on how to succeed in law school, you've basically told them nothing except that you did well because you're you; That's not helpful and it's arrogant. You might as well tell them that you aren't sure what you did that caused you to succeed, that you just ended up doing well--that's basically the truth if that's your story anyway.) than actually wanting to give people substantive advice.

09042014
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby 09042014 » Thu May 26, 2011 12:29 pm

BruceWayne wrote:
DAJ_Summer wrote:Funny, I guess different people can have different approaches, but I disagree with basically everything you wrote.

I did extremely well in law school, and of the people I spoke with who were in a similar position (it gets pretty easy to tell who it is, which is kind of sad, but that's a topic for another day) maybe one of ten did prep before law school started. That's an oddly specific stat, I'm well aware - but again, these things do come up (and again, that is sad).

I also can't imagine researching "cutting edge" arguments or policies, or even professor's positions, to be helpeful.

I am a very slow typist and my exams were all but certainly shorter than average, and I still did well. Again, amongst the set of people I know who had similar performance, typing speed or exam length didn't seem to be a factor at all.

And I made all of my outlines from scratch :lol:


Different schools may warrant different approaches. A substantial amount of the people at the top of my school did heavy 0L prep. In fact 2 of the people in the running for the highest GPA in the entire class did it. So I'm definitely not going along with this TLS meme that it is a horrible idea and always bad--quite frankly it's not. In addition, those at the very top of the class at my school routinely write/turn in 25+ page exams. So I'm not going along with the TLS schick that length doesn't matter either. I'm not saying that it's impossible to succeed any other way, but I want people to make sure that they take a lot of the so called "defintely correct" TLS advice with a grain of salt. Frankly, a lot of it has more to do with bragging and wanting to come off as brilliant (oh I didn't do any studying before I got to law school, I didn't do much work during 1L and had a great social life, and I didn't even type that much up on my exams but I still came out top 10 percent etc.) than actually wanting to give people substantive advice.


People never know what actually works for them. They just know what they did, and how well they did.

There is nothing sufficient and nothing necessary to do well in law school. Other than applying law to facts. I think 80% of it is innate.

dakatz
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby dakatz » Thu May 26, 2011 12:37 pm

BruceWayne wrote:
DAJ_Summer wrote:Funny, I guess different people can have different approaches, but I disagree with basically everything you wrote.

I did extremely well in law school, and of the people I spoke with who were in a similar position (it gets pretty easy to tell who it is, which is kind of sad, but that's a topic for another day) maybe one of ten did prep before law school started. That's an oddly specific stat, I'm well aware - but again, these things do come up (and again, that is sad).

I also can't imagine researching "cutting edge" arguments or policies, or even professor's positions, to be helpeful.

I am a very slow typist and my exams were all but certainly shorter than average, and I still did well. Again, amongst the set of people I know who had similar performance, typing speed or exam length didn't seem to be a factor at all.

And I made all of my outlines from scratch :lol:


Different schools may warrant different approaches. A substantial amount of the people at the top of my school did heavy 0L prep. In fact 2 of the people in the running for the highest GPA in the entire class did it. So I'm definitely not going along with this TLS meme that it is a horrible idea and always bad--quite frankly it's not. In addition, those at the very top of the class at my school routinely write/turn in 25+ page exams. So I'm not going along with the TLS schick that length doesn't matter either. I'm not saying that it's impossible to succeed any other way, but I want people to make sure that they take a lot of the so called "definitely correct" TLS advice with a grain of salt. Frankly, a lot of it has more to do with bragging and wanting to come across as brilliant ("oh I didn't do any studying before I got to law school, I didn't do much work during 1L and had a great social life, and I didn't even type that much up on my exams but I still came out top 10 percent" etc.) than actually wanting to give people substantive advice.


But it is quite different when students who actually DID 0L prep can explain clearly why it can hurt. There are numerous things I would caution to 0L's who read your post.

1. There is a good chance that it is far more correlation than causation. The top people in the class were likely the smartest to begin with and the most high-strung by nature (for whom it was inevitable that they would reach for prep books as a kneejerk reaction). It would be an unwarranted assumption to think that those books made them any smarter or put them where they are.

2. No one said 0L prep is always bad. Lets assume for the moment that the top people in your class actually did earn their spots based on 0L prep. For every student who reads those books and utilizes them in a way that actually helps, you will have numerous others who learn bad habits, get in a rut with law that doesn't apply to their courses, etc. So even if it did help the top people in the class, it can still have a harmful effect on many others.

3. Courses are just too variable and professors differ too much in their approach to make 0L prep a viable option. Perhaps your school teaches things in a more doctrinal and straightforward manner. But my professors couldn't have differed more from the typical approach. As I said, I was duped into 0L prep by my own arrogance, and it hurt me. I read E&E's and filled my head with info that ended up being useless. My K's and property professors differed wildly from what the prep books said. That was nearly a month of wasted time. And not only was it wasted, but I had to "unlearn" things. My professor was saying one thing, and the voice in the back of my mind from my summer of reading was saying another. This constant conflict only made things more difficult, and it would have been so much easier to just be a clean slate so that I could have absorbed everything my professor said without a problem.

I am not a bitter rising 2L who wishes he had done 0L prep. I did quite well first year, and it had absolutely nothing to do with the prep I did before school.

09042014
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby 09042014 » Thu May 26, 2011 12:44 pm

I can tell you right now, that 0L prep would have hurt me in 2/4 of my first semester classes. The professors didn't want supplement bullshit, they had their own theory they taught.

Furthermore I don't see how this shit could possibly help. The material in law isn't that hard at all. It's the application that's hard, and knowing the material 4-5 months before the test just isn't helpful.

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Cupidity
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Cupidity » Thu May 26, 2011 12:51 pm

Consensus on here is that study groups are useless. I think that studying with others is the most useful thing you go can do during finals.

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Borhas
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Borhas » Thu May 26, 2011 12:53 pm

Desert Fox wrote:Furthermore I don't see how this shit could possibly help. The material in law isn't that hard at all. It's the application that's hard, and knowing the material 4-5 months before the test just isn't helpful.


honestly, the application isn't hard either... It's all just analogies + hyper analyzed common sense... it's all fairly straight forward shit, law school would be laughably easy if the ITE monster wasn't looming around the corner and people's lust for the coveted top 1-10%.

the one thing I regret is taking the "Advice" of the overworked and overstressed gunners.



Cupidity wrote:Consensus on here is that study groups are useless. I think that studying with others is the most useful thing you go can do during finals.


They aren't always useless, this is one of those "do what works for you" (course you have to know what works for you)... hell at the very least you are around other human beings... which is not something to scoff at towards the end of finals when you start to realize your only human contact is through sideway glances at the library, or snarks on the internet.
Last edited by Borhas on Thu May 26, 2011 12:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.

dakatz
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby dakatz » Thu May 26, 2011 12:55 pm

Cupidity wrote:Consensus on here is that study groups are useless. I think that studying with others is the most useful thing you go can do during finals.


I've never heard anyone on this site say that study groups are objectively useless. I don't think many people would argue that getting together with 1 or 2 other people to review a practice final is a good idea.

09042014
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby 09042014 » Thu May 26, 2011 12:56 pm

Borhas wrote:
Desert Fox wrote:Furthermore I don't see how this shit could possibly help. The material in law isn't that hard at all. It's the application that's hard, and knowing the material 4-5 months before the test just isn't helpful.


honestly, the application isn't hard either... It's all just analogies + hyper analyzed common sense... it's all fairly straight forward shit, law school would be laughably easy if the ITE monster wasn't looming around the corner and people's lust for the coveted top 1-10%.

the one thing I regret is taking the "Advice" of the overworked and overstressed gunners.


If not for the curve, it wouldn't be hard at all. But since there is one, professors have to make the tests insanely hard, and the way they do it is by hiding shit, and making it time crunched.

Even with the curve it is a lot easier than my electrical engineering undergrad.

If it was 2006 and everyone at my school could get big law, school wouldn't' be hard at all.

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Mickey Quicknumbers
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Mickey Quicknumbers » Thu May 26, 2011 1:04 pm

Cupidity wrote:Consensus on here is that study groups are useless. I think that studying with others is the most useful thing you go can do during finals.

This this this this this.


Although I'll qualify it by saying that if it's someone who isn't serious-business and you end up talking about the NBA for three hours, it can be very detrimental, so be wise in who you study with.

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BruceWayne
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby BruceWayne » Thu May 26, 2011 1:07 pm

dakatz wrote:But it is quite different when students who actually DID 0L prep can explain clearly why it can hurt. There are numerous things I would caution to 0L's who read your post.

1. There is a good chance that it is far more correlation than causation. The top people in the class were likely the smartest to begin with and the most high-strung by nature (for whom it was inevitable that they would reach for prep books as a kneejerk reaction). It would be an unwarranted assumption to think that those books made them any smarter or put them where they are.

2. No one said 0L prep is always bad. Lets assume for the moment that the top people in your class actually did earn their spots based on 0L prep. For every student who reads those books and utilizes them in a way that actually helps, you will have numerous others who learn bad habits, get in a rut with law that doesn't apply to their courses, etc. So even if it did help the top people in the class, it can still have a harmful effect on many others.

3. Courses are just too variable and professors differ too much in their approach to make 0L prep a viable option. Perhaps your school teaches things in a more doctrinal and straightforward manner. But my professors couldn't have differed more from the typical approach. As I said, I was duped into 0L prep by my own arrogance, and it hurt me. I read E&E's and filled my head with info that ended up being useless. My K's and property professors differed wildly from what the prep books said. That was nearly a month of wasted time. And not only was it wasted, but I had to "unlearn" things. My professor was saying one thing, and the voice in the back of my mind from my summer of reading was saying another. This constant conflict only made things more difficult, and it would have been so much easier to just be a clean slate so that I could have absorbed everything my professor said without a problem.

I am not a bitter rising 2L who wishes he had done 0L prep. I did quite well first year, and it had absolutely nothing to do with the prep I did before school.


You're exactly right that it is quite different when people who did do 0L prep argue that it can hurt. The problem is that we DON"T have anyone in that position. You are the only poster I've seen who claims to have done 0L prep and have it hurt them. And you only popped up after seeing someone else recommend it...

1. It's not about 0L prep making students smarter. It doesn't take an especially smart person to do well on law school exams. Honestly, after reading exams that receive A+s it's more about being an automaton--being very organized, making a comment on every last issue, and having time to make sure everything comes across coherently are critical. Law isn't physics. LEEWS talks about this, and it's not something you really get until you've gone through law school, but a person of average intelligence has the intellectual tools to do well in law school. What 0L prep can help with is saving you valuable time during the semester. You don't want to be wasting a lot of time studying the BLL when you should already by applying it on exams and practicing. In addition, the basic BLL is the same for many of the 1L courses. I'm sorry but if your teacher is teaching you something different about Venue or Personal jurisdiction than what's in Freer or Glannon, then you need to report him/her to the dean because they aren't qualified to teach law. Learning the rules of Subject matter jurisdiction and Venue before starting Civ Pro will not hurt you. There's just no way to reasonable argument that it can.

2. If you're just leaning BLL (which is what the top people at my school did in their 0L prep) then you aren't picking up any "bad habits." Unless you somehow view knowing how venue and supplemental jurisdiction work as a "bad habit".

3. Again the whole point of 0L prep is that if gives you more time during the semester to learn the individual preferences of your professor--that's what the students who did 0L prep at my school did. While many of us were just learning the rules of Civ Pro or what Nuisance and imputed negligence were, these students were reading our professors law review articles, studying the latest arguments being put forth in the legal community, and applying the professors preferences on practice exams. They had memorized/learned the basic Black letter law cold long ago; they had graduated to learning the professor--which in many ways is the most important part of succeeding in a given class. As far as having to "unlearn bad/wrong habits" what exactly did you pick up that was so bad? Were you studying something beyond the BLL? Because, unless your professor essentially didn't know the law himself, you shouldn't have to unlearn the MPC provisions for homicide or the rules for Res Judicata. The truth is that, although professors may have differing takes on exactly how the law applies etc. the basic BLL is the same. I mean if it wasn't, you couldn't even have basic doctrinal classes or a system of rules like Civil Procedure.

Finally, and again I'll admit that different schools may be different, but a big percentage of those at the top of the class at my school did 0L prep. I'm just sharing with people what I know worked for others at my school (very well in fact).






Desert Fox wrote:If not for the curve, it wouldn't be hard at all. But since there is one, professors have to make the tests insanely hard, and the way they do it is by hiding shit, and making it time crunched.

Even with the curve it is a lot easier than my electrical engineering undergrad.

If it was 2006 and everyone at my school could get big law, school wouldn't' be hard at all.


And this is the massive irony of law school. If it wasn't for the curve it wouldn't be hard at all. Frankly, I think that that's the reason that law schools use a forced curve--unlike a lot of other disciplines what we study isn't difficult to understand. So to make up for that they grade us on a forced curve so that they can make gradations.

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Mickey Quicknumbers
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Mickey Quicknumbers » Thu May 26, 2011 1:21 pm

BruceWayne wrote:2. If you're just leaning BLL (which is what the top people at my school did in their 0L prep) then you aren't picking up any "bad habits." Unless you somehow view knowing how venue and supplemental jurisdiction work as a "bad habit".

Meh. If you read a supplement that covers the 2nd restatement on products liability, and your professor decides that he likes California's approach of adopting the third restatement, then having the wrong test ingrained into your head could easily confuse you whether or not the burden is on the plaintiff or the defendant, what they have to prove, whether it's risk utility, or how much of a gray area between strict liability and negligence there is.

I can easily see 0L prep hurting someone intuitively.

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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby dakatz » Thu May 26, 2011 1:32 pm

@Bruce - I've been saying that it was a waste of time for months now. Most people who did the 0L prep don't even admit to it. And many who do aren't able to perceive any effect since it would be difficult to know what results came from intelligence/studying, and what came from 0L prep. I just happened to have a particularly bad experience in which I can sift out the effect of the 0L prep from everything else. Most people are unable to differentiate in this way because it usually ends up being something entirely neutral and pointless, not necessarily detrimental. But even if it were neutral, it still doesn't make it worth doing.

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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby beach_terror » Thu May 26, 2011 1:38 pm

xyzbca wrote:I'll get some pushback for this but I think E+E's are vastly overrated (with Civ. Pro. being the exception). I think they are too simplistic and I don't like them.

+1. Beside the Torts E&E, I found better supps for every class.

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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby Kilpatrick » Thu May 26, 2011 1:39 pm

I really don't believe that all the top people at your school did 0L prep. I don't know a single person at the top of my class who did. They might have just told you they did because people in law school like to exaggerate how hard they work. Like the people who say they study for 8 hours in the library every day but really most of that time they're on facebook. These people probably said they did 'intensive 0l prep' but all they did was flip through an E&E.

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gwuorbust
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby gwuorbust » Thu May 26, 2011 1:42 pm

90% of what everyone says to do for lawl school is worthless. I never brief one case and I am prob going to be just above median. Would have briefing cases helped? No

Things I think are worthless:

0L prep (besides, maybe, GTM)
Briefing
Writing your own outlines from scratch
Memorizing cases (depends on the class)
Reading cases (generally, I found it unnecessary to read cases. 4lawschool briefs and old outlines FTW)
Study groups with more than 2 other people (they get too large)

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BruceWayne
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby BruceWayne » Thu May 26, 2011 1:54 pm

gwuorbust wrote:90% of what everyone says to do for lawl school is worthless. I never brief one case and I am prob going to be just above median. Would have briefing cases helped? No

Things I think are worthless:

0L prep (besides, maybe, GTM)
Briefing
Writing your own outlines from scratch
Memorizing cases (depends on the class)
Reading cases (generally, I found it unnecessary to read cases. 4lawschool briefs and old outlines FTW)
Study groups with more than 2 other people (they get too large)


So basically just show up to exams and wing it then? That's the key to success?
"BruceWayne"....but I want people to make sure that they take a lot of the so called "definitely correct" TLS advice with a grain of salt. Frankly, a lot of it has more to do with bragging and wanting to come across as brilliant ("oh I didn't do any studying before I got to law school, I didn't do much work during 1L and had a great social life, and I didn't even type that much up on my exams but I still came out top 10 percent" etc. If you think about it, when you give that response to someone who is asking for advice on how to succeed in law school, you've basically told them nothing except that you did well because you're you; That's not helpful and it's arrogant. You might as well tell them that you aren't sure what you did that caused you to succeed, that you just ended up doing well--that's basically the truth if that's your story anyway.) than actually wanting to give people substantive advice.

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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby NarwhalPunter » Thu May 26, 2011 1:56 pm

gwuorbust wrote:90% of what everyone says to do for lawl school is worthless. I never brief one case and I am prob going to be just above median. Would have briefing cases helped? No

Things I think are worthless:

0L prep (besides, maybe, GTM)
Briefing
Writing your own outlines from scratch
Memorizing cases (depends on the class)
Reading cases (generally, I found it unnecessary to read cases. 4lawschool briefs and old outlines FTW)
Study groups with more than 2 other people (they get too large)



Sounds like you were lazy and looked for shortcuts, little wonder that you were median pwned.

Not reading cases is terrible advice for incoming 1L's.

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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby kaiser » Thu May 26, 2011 1:59 pm

gwuorbust wrote:90% of what everyone says to do for lawl school is worthless. I never brief one case and I am prob going to be just above median. Would have briefing cases helped? No

Things I think are worthless:

0L prep (besides, maybe, GTM)
Briefing
Writing your own outlines from scratch
Memorizing cases (depends on the class)
Reading cases (generally, I found it unnecessary to read cases. 4lawschool briefs and old outlines FTW)
Study groups with more than 2 other people (they get too large)


I think some of this is a bit overboard. I can understand not spending with 0L prep and not briefing. But what exactly occupied your time all semester if you didn't read cases, make outlines, etc.? Sure, those websites are fine for quickly verifying what a rule of law was, or to jog your memory, but I don't think its a good idea to rely on them too heavily.

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beach_terror
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby beach_terror » Thu May 26, 2011 2:04 pm

NarwhalPunter wrote:
gwuorbust wrote:90% of what everyone says to do for lawl school is worthless. I never brief one case and I am prob going to be just above median. Would have briefing cases helped? No

Things I think are worthless:

0L prep (besides, maybe, GTM)
Briefing
Writing your own outlines from scratch
Memorizing cases (depends on the class)
Reading cases (generally, I found it unnecessary to read cases. 4lawschool briefs and old outlines FTW)
Study groups with more than 2 other people (they get too large)



Sounds like you were lazy and looked for shortcuts, little wonder that you were median pwned.

Not reading cases is terrible advice for incoming 1L's.

+1. Not reading cases is fucking stupid. If nothing else, they help teach you issue spotting (OMG, similar facts appear on the exam that trigger the application of the rule!). Also, if you're at median then how are you writing off things as useless? I'm not trying to be a dickhead, but you don't seem to have been successful employing your method.

FWIW, top 25% (closer to 20%) after first semester. I significantly altered my preparation and exam taking strategy for second semester. Still waiting on results though.

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rdcws000
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby rdcws000 » Thu May 26, 2011 3:01 pm

I regret buying Gilbert's and Emannuels outlines for K and Torts first semester. I never used them, and honestly I don't know what I would have used them for, but I bought them because LSC recommended them. They've been riding around in my trunk for almost a full year now.

I found E & E's to be extremely useful study tools. When I couldn't find many practice essays for a class, I would write mini practice essays on the examples.

Also, count me as one who does not follow the conventional wisdom that briefing cases is useless. I still brief all cases. I don't care much about looking good in class, but I find it is the best way for me to get everything out of the case I can, and also have a summary of the important points I can go back to. I'm sure I could shave a little time by not briefing, but I don't think I would cut my time in half or anything. I know some people who study using other methods and refuse to brief, yet they still spend more time studying than I do.

I'm thinking this thread would be a disaster for an 0L to read. People with decent grades have chosen to do, or chosen not to do every single combination of prep/study techniques. I think people need to evaluate themselves and what kind of things they have done in the past. Try it, and adapt.

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gwuorbust
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Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby gwuorbust » Thu May 26, 2011 3:19 pm

I stopped reading cases in the Spring because I realized that they were not helpful. Say what you want, but I learned everything about each case. There is a difference between preparing and preparing right. I read summaries of each case, 2 supplements per class, had 2/3 outlines per class, took extreme notes, and did about ~7 practice test per class + followed up with questions to the professor during office hours.

That I was median pwned is because I misread a few questions in Contracts and because I was killed by LRW. My general test taking is actually pretty good. Reading cases would not have helped in either of those classes.

What matters is the theory behind each case and its application. If I can learn that without wasting my time, why would I do anything else?

And as for what I did with my time, I spent about 20 hours per week running my company.

longhornlaw
Posts: 300
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:40 am

Re: 0L-3L advice you regret taking?

Postby longhornlaw » Thu May 26, 2011 3:22 pm

I regret not finding out about taxguy until it was almost too late.




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