Computers for Law School 2011

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:05 pm

bb8900 wrote:What do you guys think of this laptop for law school:

MBP 13"
2.3GHz Dual-core Intel Core i5
8GB 1333MHz DDR3 SDRAM - 2x4GB
500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm

Probably with Circus Ponies for notes

Please give me your thoughts on what this would be like for law school?


Read the thread.

albanach
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby albanach » Sat Jul 02, 2011 11:19 pm

Stoic wrote:
albanach wrote:
ebo wrote:Ok I don't game or make movies or anything like that. I use my computer for Office, itunes, web surfing, and that's it.

Is this a reasonable choice for me?

--LinkRemoved--


No, it's really not.

You really do want 4GB of RAM. It will make everything faster, especially once you have many firefox/chrome/ie tabs open in your browser.

It's a core2duo so you're paying for old technology.

Look for a thinkpad that has a core i3 or i5 processor and 4GB of RAM. You can find one for less than $100 more than this, and you'll get a faster, more modern computer. The newer processor will significantly improve your battery life too, making the laptop more usable, especially in three years time when your battery is on its last legs. Unless you'd expect to be able to buy a replacement at little to no notice, you may want to consider an extended on-site warranty.

Is on site good enough or should one get the thinkpad battery as well? I'm forgetting the name but I mean the one that covers spills and all that? I'm leaning towards just the onsite. I don't think I've ever dropped my laptop. But I've also never owned a Lenovo and I do have a tendency to just plop my backpack on the floor with my laptop inside.


The way I see it, you can only borrow extra for a computer once. I'll therefore be getting coverage against accidental damage. YMMV.

LSATclincher
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby LSATclincher » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:05 am

You can build this Lenovo X220 through the B&N student website for about $950 (including tax and shipping). The July 4th promo expires today, so my question is whether or not I can find a better deal if I wait?

I like the X220 for two reasons: weight/portability and battery life. This one is upgraded to a 9 cell battery, which should last around 10 hours, if not more.

Intel Core i5-2520M Processor (2.5GHz, 3MB L3, 1333MHz FSB)
Genuine Windows 7 Home Premium 6412
12.5" HD (1366x768) LED Backlit Display, Mobile Broadband Ready, 3x3 Antenna
Intel® HD Graphics 3000
4 GB DDR3 - 1333MHz (1 DIMM)8
Fingerprint Reader
320 GB Hard Disk Drive, 7200rpm4
ThinkPad Battery 29++ (9 cell)
Bluetooth 3.0
Intel Centrino Wireless-N 100010
Integrated Mobile Broadband - Upgradable
4286 : 1 Year Depot Warranty - TopSeller

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Eugenie Danglars
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby Eugenie Danglars » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:10 am

LSATclincher wrote:You can build this Lenovo X220 through the B&N student website for about $950 (including tax and shipping). The July 4th promo expires today, so my question is whether or not I can find a better deal if I wait?

I like the X220 for two reasons: weight/portability and battery life. This one is upgraded to a 9 cell battery, which should last around 10 hours.

Intel Core i5-2520M Processor (2.5GHz, 3MB L3, 1333MHz FSB)
Genuine Windows 7 Home Premium 6412
12.5" HD (1366x768) LED Backlit Display, Mobile Broadband Ready, 3x3 Antenna
Intel® HD Graphics 3000
4 GB DDR3 - 1333MHz (1 DIMM)8
Fingerprint Reader
320 GB Hard Disk Drive, 7200rpm4
ThinkPad Battery 29++ (9 cell)
Bluetooth 3.0
Intel Centrino Wireless-N 100010
Integrated Mobile Broadband - Upgradable
4286 : 1 Year Depot Warranty - TopSeller


I got the same thing (but with an upgraded warranty) for within $10 of that price through lenovo using the 15% student discount and the 10% new customer discount. I don't think you'll find it cheaper, but that price is not once-in-a-lifetime.

Stoic
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby Stoic » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:12 am

albanach wrote:
Stoic wrote:
albanach wrote:
ebo wrote:Ok I don't game or make movies or anything like that. I use my computer for Office, itunes, web surfing, and that's it.

Is this a reasonable choice for me?

--LinkRemoved--


No, it's really not.

You really do want 4GB of RAM. It will make everything faster, especially once you have many firefox/chrome/ie tabs open in your browser.

It's a core2duo so you're paying for old technology.

Look for a thinkpad that has a core i3 or i5 processor and 4GB of RAM. You can find one for less than $100 more than this, and you'll get a faster, more modern computer. The newer processor will significantly improve your battery life too, making the laptop more usable, especially in three years time when your battery is on its last legs. Unless you'd expect to be able to buy a replacement at little to no notice, you may want to consider an extended on-site warranty.

Is on site good enough or should one get the thinkpad battery as well? I'm forgetting the name but I mean the one that covers spills and all that? I'm leaning towards just the onsite. I don't think I've ever dropped my laptop. But I've also never owned a Lenovo and I do have a tendency to just plop my backpack on the floor with my laptop inside.


The way I see it, you can only borrow extra for a computer once. I'll therefore be getting coverage against accidental damage. YMMV.

What's frustrating is that I can't find the E420 (the one I'm getting unless someone advises against it...got scared off by the E40s and it's non-replaceable battery) in stores anywhere. I don't buy anything without trying it first. But I'm looking at the 4th of july sale right now on the Lenovo website and I'm incredibly tempted.

LSATclincher
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby LSATclincher » Mon Jul 04, 2011 5:23 pm

I just found this Asus. At this price, it's an incredible value. I'm now deciding between this and shelling out $300-$400 more for the Lenovo X220.

--LinkRemoved--

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Mon Jul 04, 2011 5:41 pm

The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.

ColomboHeat
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ColomboHeat » Mon Jul 04, 2011 7:10 pm

I dunno man, I'd pay 300 more dollars for the Lenovo keyboard alone.

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:10 pm

maxm2764 wrote:The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.


lol.. hate on *what*? It's a freaking PC with a different OS and a markup.

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zeth006
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby zeth006 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 3:14 am

ResolutePear wrote:
maxm2764 wrote:The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.


lol.. hate on *what*? It's a freaking PC with a different OS and a markup.


On top of that, most people with the exception of a few debates on and off have been pretty level-headed about Mac v. PC. I lean more towards PCs for my own personal uses, but I still recommend Macs to others who want fewer hassles.

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bigjinjapan
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby bigjinjapan » Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:42 am

zeth006 wrote:
ResolutePear wrote:
maxm2764 wrote:The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.


lol.. hate on *what*? It's a freaking PC with a different OS and a markup.


On top of that, most people with the exception of a few debates on and off have been pretty level-headed about Mac v. PC. I lean more towards PCs for my own personal uses, but I still recommend Macs to others who want fewer hassles.


Apparently recommending anything other than a mac is 'hating' in this hood.

WayBryson
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby WayBryson » Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:59 am

The anti-PC trolling on this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:32 am

ResolutePear wrote:
maxm2764 wrote:The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.


lol.. hate on *what*? It's a freaking more reliable PC with a different more efficient OS, better hardware and a markup.


FTFY. The markup part is definitely credited.

But, IMO, Windows is a unecessarily cluttered OS that could use some serious cleaning up.

Edit: Disclaimer: I may or may not have spent some time working for Apple, so I may or may not have drank the Apple Kool-Aid. :D

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Jul 05, 2011 10:31 am

maxm2764 wrote:
ResolutePear wrote:
maxm2764 wrote:The overwhelming anti-Mac trolling in this thread is obnoxious. Haters gonna hate, I guess.


lol.. hate on *what*? It's a freaking more reliable PC with a different more efficient OS, better hardware and a markup.


FTFY. The markup part is definitely credited.

But, IMO, Windows is a unecessarily cluttered OS that could use some serious cleaning up.

Edit: Disclaimer: I may or may not have spent some time working for Apple, so I may or may not have drank the Apple Kool-Aid. :D


QFNOTWORKINGINITPROFESSION - Go tell any corporation to run their infrastructure off Xserves and OSX.

BSD is reliable, the GUI and Cocoa libraries are an absolute mindfuck. You have this programming language that's like C, but not C. Like C++, but not C++. Like Java, but not Java. Granted, MFC wasn't much better back in Windows 95, but I'd like to think that Microsoft made good with .NET. Not to mention that the OpenGL implementation for some reason doesn't benchmark as it should on OSX.

As for the hardware.. you do know it's the SAME exact crap you find in a less expensive laptop, right? Go ahead and open your HD slot.. is that an "Apple" HD? How about the ridiculously marked-up RAM? Is that Apple? How about...

The CPU? Nah, that belongs to Intel. Then surely, there must an "Apple" graphics card?! Nope. Nvidia/ATI(AMD). Well, surely that beautiful LCD screen is from the magic land of Apple! Nope. There is nothing that Apple puts inside their laptops that other manufactures don't have access to - most of them at the cost of a macbook usually put better components inside.

Odd. They must assemble the macbooks in a place with really good quality control, exclusive to macbooks then?! Nope, Foxconn factory that manufactures for HP, Sony, etc. alongside Apple.

I could go on forever bashing OSX/Macbooks - and it's pretty easy - the important thing is.. I'm giving facts and specifics while not throwing out random knob-job phrases without making a single contribution to the thread. Lets hear some of the downfalls of Windows - specifics are golden.

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Dany
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby Dany » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:25 am

At the end of the day, why on earth do you care what other people buy? No one is going to force you to buy a Mac, so I think you'll be just fine. People pay extra for things that I think are silly all the time, yet I don't care because it's not really any of my business and doesn't affect me in any way.

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:30 am

Dany wrote:At the end of the day, why on earth do you care what other people buy? No one is going to force you to buy a Mac, so I think you'll be just fine. People pay extra for things that I think are silly all the time, yet I don't care because it's not really any of my business and doesn't affect me in any way.


Usually I don't care what people buy - until I have to deal with it at work.

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:04 pm

Jeez RP, did I hit a nerve?

My specifics aren't going to go as far into tech specs as yours did, because honestly, you probably know a whole lot more about it than I do. You could definitely teach me a lot about things like programming code because I by no means am trying to claim that I know everything there is to know about Mac's or PC's. I don't. Anyways.

My original comment had nothing to do with where the parts are manufactured or who makes them, so if it came off as that I'm sorry I miscommunicated my point. On a surface level, the aluminum unibody on the MBP line is a much better design than the plastic-composite material used on a Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, ASUS, etc. The unibody design decreases the amount of "moving parts" thus contributing to a much lower rate of necessary maintenance. The design also keeps the entire unit cooler lowering the chances of overheating. And the design is entirely Apple's.

In practical terms, I think I'll just give my own personal experiences to defend my comment in regards to the hardware.

In undergrad I had one computer, and yes it was a Mac. I never had any issue with the hardware, both internal and external, of my laptop. The hard drive never failed, the battery life never decreased, the computer never overheated, I never had to replace a key on the keypad, etc.

My roommate on the other hand had three. A Toshiba, a Dell, and a Thinkpad. All three had to be replaced within 16 months of purchase due to some type of cosmetic or internal hardware malfunction. Again, this is my own personal experience so take it for what it is. Maybe mine I just an extreme case, but I want my computer to last more than 1-2 years. Oh also, the glossy LCD Display is crap, high-res anti-glare display FTW.

As far as Windows goes, I stand by my comment. To me, it seems cluttered. You could remove one unnecessary step from each task you're trying to example. For example, why is it that everytime I want to connect a peripheral device I have to install a driver to connect? The spyware and anti-virus programs that you have to install in order to safely operate the OS is a burden too. Mac's may be marked-up, but if you purchase a comparable PC with Windows and 1 or 2 virus protection programs you're getting damn close to the same price point.

And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?

Again, this is all personal preferences based on personal experiences. Maybe I've just been around a bad crop of PC's, I don't know. To each their own I guess.

And, just off of the top of my head, one example of corporate use of Mac and OSX is Reliant Energy. Reliant Energy runs their entire corporartion on Mac's and they're the largest energy provider in the South/Southwest and own multiple arenas, stadium, venues powered by Mac's and OSX. So it definitely can be done and can work out pretty well.

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bk1
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby bk1 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:45 pm

maxm2764 wrote:Jeez RP, did I hit a nerve?

My specifics aren't going to go as far into tech specs as yours did, because honestly, you probably know a whole lot more about it than I do. You could definitely teach me a lot about things like programming code because I by no means am trying to claim that I know everything there is to know about Mac's or PC's. I don't. Anyways.

My original comment had nothing to do with where the parts are manufactured or who makes them, so if it came off as that I'm sorry I miscommunicated my point. On a surface level, the aluminum unibody on the MBP line is a much better design than the plastic-composite material used on a Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, ASUS, etc. The unibody design decreases the amount of "moving parts" thus contributing to a much lower rate of necessary maintenance. The design also keeps the entire unit cooler lowering the chances of overheating. And the design is entirely Apple's.

In practical terms, I think I'll just give my own personal experiences to defend my comment in regards to the hardware.

In undergrad I had one computer, and yes it was a Mac. I never had any issue with the hardware, both internal and external, of my laptop. The hard drive never failed, the battery life never decreased, the computer never overheated, I never had to replace a key on the keypad, etc.

My roommate on the other hand had three. A Toshiba, a Dell, and a Thinkpad. All three had to be replaced within 16 months of purchase due to some type of cosmetic or internal hardware malfunction. Again, this is my own personal experience so take it for what it is. Maybe mine I just an extreme case, but I want my computer to last more than 1-2 years. Oh also, the glossy LCD Display is crap, high-res anti-glare display FTW.

As far as Windows goes, I stand by my comment. To me, it seems cluttered. You could remove one unnecessary step from each task you're trying to example. For example, why is it that everytime I want to connect a peripheral device I have to install a driver to connect? The spyware and anti-virus programs that you have to install in order to safely operate the OS is a burden too. Mac's may be marked-up, but if you purchase a comparable PC with Windows and 1 or 2 virus protection programs you're getting damn close to the same price point.

And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?

Again, this is all personal preferences based on personal experiences. Maybe I've just been around a bad crop of PC's, I don't know. To each their own I guess.

And, just off of the top of my head, one example of corporate use of Mac and OSX is Reliant Energy. Reliant Energy runs their entire corporartion on Mac's and they're the largest energy provider in the South/Southwest and own multiple arenas, stadium, venues powered by Mac's and OSX. So it definitely can be done and can work out pretty well.


So anecdotal evidence is... anecdotal?

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zeth006
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby zeth006 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:45 pm

maxm2764 wrote:Jeez RP, did I hit a nerve?

My specifics aren't going to go as far into tech specs as yours did, because honestly, you probably know a whole lot more about it than I do. You could definitely teach me a lot about things like programming code because I by no means am trying to claim that I know everything there is to know about Mac's or PC's. I don't. Anyways.

My original comment had nothing to do with where the parts are manufactured or who makes them, so if it came off as that I'm sorry I miscommunicated my point. On a surface level, the aluminum unibody on the MBP line is a much better design than the plastic-composite material used on a Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, ASUS, etc. The unibody design decreases the amount of "moving parts" thus contributing to a much lower rate of necessary maintenance. The design also keeps the entire unit cooler lowering the chances of overheating. And the design is entirely Apple's.

In practical terms, I think I'll just give my own personal experiences to defend my comment in regards to the hardware.

In undergrad I had one computer, and yes it was a Mac. I never had any issue with the hardware, both internal and external, of my laptop. The hard drive never failed, the battery life never decreased, the computer never overheated, I never had to replace a key on the keypad, etc.

My roommate on the other hand had three. A Toshiba, a Dell, and a Thinkpad. All three had to be replaced within 16 months of purchase due to some type of cosmetic or internal hardware malfunction. Again, this is my own personal experience so take it for what it is. Maybe mine I just an extreme case, but I want my computer to last more than 1-2 years. Oh also, the glossy LCD Display is crap, high-res anti-glare display FTW.

As far as Windows goes, I stand by my comment. To me, it seems cluttered. You could remove one unnecessary step from each task you're trying to example. For example, why is it that everytime I want to connect a peripheral device I have to install a driver to connect? The spyware and anti-virus programs that you have to install in order to safely operate the OS is a burden too. Mac's may be marked-up, but if you purchase a comparable PC with Windows and 1 or 2 virus protection programs you're getting damn close to the same price point.

And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?

Again, this is all personal preferences based on personal experiences. Maybe I've just been around a bad crop of PC's, I don't know. To each their own I guess.

And, just off of the top of my head, one example of corporate use of Mac and OSX is Reliant Energy. Reliant Energy runs their entire corporartion on Mac's and they're the largest energy provider in the South/Southwest and own multiple arenas, stadium, venues powered by Mac's and OSX. So it definitely can be done and can work out pretty well.



Barring studies that show otherwise, the unibody design doesn't prevent parts from moving around. All the parts have just been engineered to fit into a thinner form factor. And reliability statistics show Macs are right around industry average anyway. And the need for installation of drivers? Doesn't happen to often for me, but when it does, Windows does it automatically within a couple of seconds for me. Essentially, you're invoking the wrong reasons a person should go Mac. You haven't mentioned one.


And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?


A number of reasons. But the biggest one is brick and mortar support. I can troubleshoot a good number of hardware and software issues that crop up on my notebook. But most people couldn't with their Mac. Apple Genius Bar reps are good about getting things fixed and providing free coverage assuming you have Applecare. Plus people tend to find OSX easier to use for some odd reason.

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:26 pm

zeth006 wrote:
A number of reasons. But the biggest one is brick and mortar support. I can troubleshoot a good number of hardware and software issues that crop up on my notebook. But most people couldn't with their Mac. Apple Genius Bar reps are good about getting things fixed and providing free coverage assuming you have Applecare. Plus people tend to find OSX easier to use for some odd reason.


I agree with this. I guess if you haven't tinkered around with Mac's enough to know how to troubleshoot them, then that's definitely a credited argument.

I never meant to derail this thread with my OP, and I'm sorry if I did. If my comments seemed like I was throwing out "random knob-job phrases" I apologize. I think this decision should be looked at from both sides, and I was just trying to give my perspective on it.

I do think that anyone looking at a new computer should definitely take a look at Mac's too. I have had great experiences with them, and recommend them to everyone who asks.

If that makes my experience and advice "anecdotal", then I guess I'm one of the lucky ones.

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:32 pm

maxm2764 wrote:Jeez RP, did I hit a nerve?

My specifics aren't going to go as far into tech specs as yours did, because honestly, you probably know a whole lot more about it than I do. You could definitely teach me a lot about things like programming code because I by no means am trying to claim that I know everything there is to know about Mac's or PC's. I don't. Anyways.

My original comment had nothing to do with where the parts are manufactured or who makes them, so if it came off as that I'm sorry I miscommunicated my point. On a surface level, the aluminum unibody on the MBP line is a much better design than the plastic-composite material used on a Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, ASUS, etc. The unibody design decreases the amount of "moving parts" thus contributing to a much lower rate of necessary maintenance. The design also keeps the entire unit cooler lowering the chances of overheating. And the design is entirely Apple's.

In practical terms, I think I'll just give my own personal experiences to defend my comment in regards to the hardware.

In undergrad I had one computer, and yes it was a Mac. I never had any issue with the hardware, both internal and external, of my laptop. The hard drive never failed, the battery life never decreased, the computer never overheated, I never had to replace a key on the keypad, etc.

My roommate on the other hand had three. A Toshiba, a Dell, and a Thinkpad. All three had to be replaced within 16 months of purchase due to some type of cosmetic or internal hardware malfunction. Again, this is my own personal experience so take it for what it is. Maybe mine I just an extreme case, but I want my computer to last more than 1-2 years. Oh also, the glossy LCD Display is crap, high-res anti-glare display FTW.

As far as Windows goes, I stand by my comment. To me, it seems cluttered. You could remove one unnecessary step from each task you're trying to example. For example, why is it that everytime I want to connect a peripheral device I have to install a driver to connect? The spyware and anti-virus programs that you have to install in order to safely operate the OS is a burden too. Mac's may be marked-up, but if you purchase a comparable PC with Windows and 1 or 2 virus protection programs you're getting damn close to the same price point.

And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?

Again, this is all personal preferences based on personal experiences. Maybe I've just been around a bad crop of PC's, I don't know. To each their own I guess.

And, just off of the top of my head, one example of corporate use of Mac and OSX is Reliant Energy. Reliant Energy runs their entire corporartion on Mac's and they're the largest energy provider in the South/Southwest and own multiple arenas, stadium, venues powered by Mac's and OSX. So it definitely can be done and can work out pretty well.


That's biased information. Once you bolt something down to the chassis, it's part of the body. Seat belts in a car is a good example of this. What you're trying to get at is the Thinkpad's HD chassis - it provides an anti-shock mechanism.

The unibody's purpose is aesthetics as it's been proven that the unibodies suffer something that the plastic counterparts don't: denting. Why do you think that Macbooks are now made with a plastic unibody?

Personal preference is fine - but when you're stating something to be factual, do so and elaborate. And that's regardless of how much one may know.. but once you get into "clutter" and the "better OS," be prepared to really talk about network stacks, kernels, pkg's and other updating mechanisms. Not to mention the tools of the trade for professionals in the IT field. Why? Because these are quantitative aspects.

TLS would ask no less of a thread debating law reviews, or employment in a particular field.

Talking about employment, I did look into Reliant Energy.. because the thought of using OSX by a company concerned with cost as it directly correlates to energy rates.. and the fact that it'd be pretty dangerous to run a mission-critical application on a consumer OS, I looked at several job postings from Reliant Energy. None of their IT jobs require OSX experience. Instead they require:

Integration of internal C#, .Net, Java and web applications for automation and reporting

:?:

C# and .NET are Microsoft technologies.. so I imagine they're running Windows paired with a SAP solution for their CRM, ERP, or whatever else they need. As for the low-level software and OS, I'm guessing that's a flavor of UNIX or a proprietary system altogether.

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:42 pm

zeth006 wrote:
maxm2764 wrote:Jeez RP, did I hit a nerve?

My specifics aren't going to go as far into tech specs as yours did, because honestly, you probably know a whole lot more about it than I do. You could definitely teach me a lot about things like programming code because I by no means am trying to claim that I know everything there is to know about Mac's or PC's. I don't. Anyways.

My original comment had nothing to do with where the parts are manufactured or who makes them, so if it came off as that I'm sorry I miscommunicated my point. On a surface level, the aluminum unibody on the MBP line is a much better design than the plastic-composite material used on a Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, ASUS, etc. The unibody design decreases the amount of "moving parts" thus contributing to a much lower rate of necessary maintenance. The design also keeps the entire unit cooler lowering the chances of overheating. And the design is entirely Apple's.

In practical terms, I think I'll just give my own personal experiences to defend my comment in regards to the hardware.

In undergrad I had one computer, and yes it was a Mac. I never had any issue with the hardware, both internal and external, of my laptop. The hard drive never failed, the battery life never decreased, the computer never overheated, I never had to replace a key on the keypad, etc.

My roommate on the other hand had three. A Toshiba, a Dell, and a Thinkpad. All three had to be replaced within 16 months of purchase due to some type of cosmetic or internal hardware malfunction. Again, this is my own personal experience so take it for what it is. Maybe mine I just an extreme case, but I want my computer to last more than 1-2 years. Oh also, the glossy LCD Display is crap, high-res anti-glare display FTW.

As far as Windows goes, I stand by my comment. To me, it seems cluttered. You could remove one unnecessary step from each task you're trying to example. For example, why is it that everytime I want to connect a peripheral device I have to install a driver to connect? The spyware and anti-virus programs that you have to install in order to safely operate the OS is a burden too. Mac's may be marked-up, but if you purchase a comparable PC with Windows and 1 or 2 virus protection programs you're getting damn close to the same price point.

And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?

Again, this is all personal preferences based on personal experiences. Maybe I've just been around a bad crop of PC's, I don't know. To each their own I guess.

And, just off of the top of my head, one example of corporate use of Mac and OSX is Reliant Energy. Reliant Energy runs their entire corporartion on Mac's and they're the largest energy provider in the South/Southwest and own multiple arenas, stadium, venues powered by Mac's and OSX. So it definitely can be done and can work out pretty well.



Barring studies that show otherwise, the unibody design doesn't prevent parts from moving around. All the parts have just been engineered to fit into a thinner form factor. And reliability statistics show Macs are right around industry average anyway. And the need for installation of drivers? Doesn't happen to often for me, but when it does, Windows does it automatically within a couple of seconds for me. Essentially, you're invoking the wrong reasons a person should go Mac. You haven't mentioned one.


And I've never really understood the "I use a PC but for people who want fewer hassles I recommend a Mac" argument. Why wouldn't you want fewer hassles?


A number of reasons. But the biggest one is brick and mortar support. I can troubleshoot a good number of hardware and software issues that crop up on my notebook. But most people couldn't with their Mac. Apple Genius Bar reps are good about getting things fixed and providing free coverage assuming you have Applecare. Plus people tend to find OSX easier to use for some odd reason.


See, I still think the Mac-is-easier term is a cop-out for most people studying something where they will have to eventually do productivity tasks and more. What happens if your corporation hands you a PC instead of a macbook for work? Although macbooks have a higher market share today, it's still dwarfed by PC's - something that nowadays employers want experience in.

Not to mention: Brick and Mortar support does nothing for you if the nearest mac store happens to be 100 miles away.

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:57 pm

ResolutePear wrote:That's biased information. Once you bolt something down to the chassis, it's part of the body. Seat belts in a car is a good example of this. What you're trying to get at is the Thinkpad's HD chassis - it provides an anti-shock mechanism.

The unibody's purpose is aesthetics as it's been proven that the unibodies suffer something that the plastic counterparts don't: denting. Why do you think that Macbooks are now made with a plastic unibody?

Personal preference is fine - but when you're stating something to be factual, do so and elaborate. And that's regardless of how much one may know.. but once you get into "clutter" and the "better OS," be prepared to really talk about network stacks, kernels, pkg's and other updating mechanisms. Not to mention the tools of the trade for professionals in the IT field. Why? Because these are quantitative aspects.

TLS would ask no less of a thread debating law reviews, or employment in a particular field.

Talking about employment, I did look into Reliant Energy.. because the thought of using OSX by a company concerned with cost as it directly correlates to energy rates.. and the fact that it'd be pretty dangerous to run a mission-critical application on a consumer OS, I looked at several job postings from Reliant Energy. None of their IT jobs require OSX experience. Instead they require:

Integration of internal C#, .Net, Java and web applications for automation and reporting

:?:

C# and .NET are Microsoft technologies.. so I imagine they're running Windows paired with a SAP solution for their CRM, ERP, or whatever else they need. As for the low-level software and OS, I'm guessing that's a flavor of UNIX or a proprietary system altogether.


Thanks for the lecture RP, you're definitely the king of the castle. I'll make sure I conduct myself and my postings according to your standards from here on out.

In regards to Reliant Energy. I was personally involved with helping to sell and convert a large percentage of their facilities to Mac's. They definitely didn't change their entire server infrastructure to Mac OS Server, but they did change the systems for the company's everyday operations and they're looking into a way to convert their servers in the near future. It's definitely a long, tedious process.

So, it's not a surprise your search came up with what you found. They'll absolutely need an IT department to troubleshoot Windows and any other system they're running in their company. And yes, they still run Windows, and probably will for a while, but that does not mean that NO corporation in the entire world can't run on an OS other than Windows.

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ResolutePear
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Jul 05, 2011 3:05 pm

You just said they run their entire corporation on macs... :?:

I never said it was impossible. I said it is not suited for enterprise applications.

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maxm2764
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Re: Computers for Law School 2011

Postby maxm2764 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 3:06 pm

ResolutePear wrote:You just said they run their entire corporation on macs... :?:

I never said it was impossible. I said it is not suited for enterprise applications.


Fair enough. My mistake.




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