Time saving tip

(Study Tips, Dealing With Stress, Maintaining a Social Life, Financial Aid, Internships, Bar Exam, Careers in Law . . . )
acdisagod
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 12:46 pm

Time saving tip

Postby acdisagod » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:18 pm

It has helped me dramatically to read the casenotes legal briefs book keyed to my textbook before I read a case, especially if the case is lengthy. Reading that brief summary right before I read the case makes me much less likely to be confused or have to reread sentences or paragraphs to understand the judge. It also makes it easy to sift through the facts when they are complicated. This has been especially useful in Con Law.

I know it was suggested in the Success in Law School a Unique Perspective article, but I just thought I would share my own experience with it. No idea if this will help my grades but it has definitely saved me time and frustration.

User avatar
Gamecubesupreme
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 8:54 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby Gamecubesupreme » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:24 pm

I agree with this tip.

However, I personally feel struggling with a case is part of the learning process in law school. While the final exam's hypothetical likely won't be as difficult as Pennoyer, I don't want to be so used to relying on case briefs that I forget how to analyze and interpret a case on my own.

User avatar
kalvano
Posts: 11725
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:24 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby kalvano » Tue Oct 12, 2010 12:47 am

I love my Casenotes book for Crim, but I use it after I read to check understanding.

Being able to decipher a case and what they are saying is a rather important skill.

User avatar
solotee
Posts: 481
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 5:20 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby solotee » Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:42 am

Sometimes I read the case summary before the case, sometimes after. I'm starting to like reading the case summary after reading the case (unless the case is very long).

User avatar
soaponarope
Posts: 169
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 9:02 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby soaponarope » Tue Oct 12, 2010 4:21 pm

Gamecubesupreme wrote:I agree with this tip.

However, I personally feel struggling with a case is part of the learning process in law school. While the final exam's hypothetical likely won't be as difficult as Pennoyer, I don't want to be so used to relying on case briefs that I forget how to analyze and interpret a case on my own.



Meh... Fact patterns on exams, nor in real life, are written in old 19th century arcane language. What learning process can be derived from wasting time on deciphering what "a trespass on the court" blah blah blah means. I guess if you aspire to be involved in academia, then sure... knock yourself out... otherwise, you're wasting your time (in regards to reading cases from 1890's w/o a brief).

acdisagod
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 12:46 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby acdisagod » Tue Oct 12, 2010 4:41 pm

Just a quick warning, while they are usually good about the majority opinion, the summary of the concurring and dissenting opinions are often just flat out wrong so dont rely exlusively on the casenotes. They often summarize the concurring opinions and the diseenting opinions using arguments never mentioned in the casebook. I'm sure the justices said these things in the actual opinion, but they are not in the casebook itself.

User avatar
goosey
Posts: 1543
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 11:48 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby goosey » Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:07 pm

dont mean to be obnoxious but I think the biggest time saving tip for case reading comes before you ever start law school: be a philosophy major.

I honestly think my undergrad major has made this a non-issue and Im SO grateful for it because god knows, I have 8237849732 other issues in law school and didn't need this extra one. Philosophy books are pretty parallel to case analysis in a way. They are dense, they analayze back and forth on issues, arguing each side, and are usually building little blocks of an argument throughout the text and eventually have one (or more) main point/"rule" to get across. If you learn how to read/study philosophy books, you pretty much learn how to read cases effectively.

So yeah..I guess thats a tip for those not *in* law school yet, but just thought Id share

User avatar
kalvano
Posts: 11725
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:24 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby kalvano » Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:10 pm

acdisagod wrote:Just a quick warning, while they are usually good about the majority opinion, the summary of the concurring and dissenting opinions are often just flat out wrong so dont rely exlusively on the casenotes. They often summarize the concurring opinions and the diseenting opinions using arguments never mentioned in the casebook. I'm sure the justices said these things in the actual opinion, but they are not in the casebook itself.



I've not found this to be the case at all with my Casenotes book keyed to my textbook. It's pretty awesome.

User avatar
Blindmelon
Posts: 1708
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:13 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby Blindmelon » Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:52 pm

kalvano wrote:
acdisagod wrote:Just a quick warning, while they are usually good about the majority opinion, the summary of the concurring and dissenting opinions are often just flat out wrong so dont rely exlusively on the casenotes. They often summarize the concurring opinions and the diseenting opinions using arguments never mentioned in the casebook. I'm sure the justices said these things in the actual opinion, but they are not in the casebook itself.



I've not found this to be the case at all with my Casenotes book keyed to my textbook. It's pretty awesome.


Its probably an issue with the casebook giving you an edited/paired down version of the concurring/dissent and the supp giving you the full gamut of the arguments.

TigerBeer
Posts: 178
Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 2:00 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby TigerBeer » Wed Oct 13, 2010 12:20 am

I read the cases at night and try to understand them, but if it's taking too long to get to a "full" understanding I usually just leave it alone and let the professor explain it in class rather than keep at it. Anyone else do something similar?

User avatar
kalvano
Posts: 11725
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:24 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby kalvano » Wed Oct 13, 2010 8:56 am

Blindmelon wrote:
kalvano wrote:
acdisagod wrote:Just a quick warning, while they are usually good about the majority opinion, the summary of the concurring and dissenting opinions are often just flat out wrong so dont rely exlusively on the casenotes. They often summarize the concurring opinions and the diseenting opinions using arguments never mentioned in the casebook. I'm sure the justices said these things in the actual opinion, but they are not in the casebook itself.



I've not found this to be the case at all with my Casenotes book keyed to my textbook. It's pretty awesome.


Its probably an issue with the casebook giving you an edited/paired down version of the concurring/dissent and the supp giving you the full gamut of the arguments.



No, I don't have any issues. My Casenotes book tracks perfectly with my textbook.

User avatar
Blindmelon
Posts: 1708
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:13 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby Blindmelon » Wed Oct 13, 2010 8:58 am

I was referring to acdisagod's issue.

User avatar
kalvano
Posts: 11725
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:24 am

Re: Time saving tip

Postby kalvano » Wed Oct 13, 2010 8:59 am

Blindmelon wrote:I was referring to acdisagod's issue.



Ah. Well.

Carry on then.

User avatar
inchoate_con
Posts: 209
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 9:58 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby inchoate_con » Thu Oct 14, 2010 5:19 pm

acdisagod wrote:Just a quick warning, while they are usually good about the majority opinion, the summary of the concurring and dissenting opinions are often just flat out wrong so dont rely exlusively on the casenotes. They often summarize the concurring opinions and the diseenting opinions using arguments never mentioned in the casebook. I'm sure the justices said these things in the actual opinion, but they are not in the casebook itself.


So true... for me, the dissent is not only the best part, but it also clarifies the rule and reasoning.

User avatar
20160810
Posts: 19648
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 1:18 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby 20160810 » Thu Oct 14, 2010 9:01 pm

Not that I'd recommend doing things this way, per se, but I frequently used Casenotes in lieu of the actual reading. Sometimes this allowed me to quote-unquote get all of my reading done in about an hour a week. They're an incredibly good resource.

User avatar
stocksly33
Posts: 130
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:48 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby stocksly33 » Fri Oct 15, 2010 12:21 am

i have to share a gem... i've discovered these restaurant-like places that make pre-made meals... so all you have to do is heat those fuckers up and toss the container. that or the hotfood bar at whole foods. no cooking and less dishes saves tons of time.

User avatar
wiseowl
Posts: 1071
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 4:38 pm

Re: Time saving tip

Postby wiseowl » Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:09 am

Got my highest grade in ConLaw doing this. Definitely read the cases and pay attention in class, but this supplement, especially in ebook form, is gold for outlining/exams.




Return to “Forum for Law School Students”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: pkou19 and 2 guests